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People, Organizations, and Families

57th Regiment, Peterborough Rangers

  • Corporate body

The 57th Batallion of Infantry was gazetted in 1867. In total, seven independent companies were amalgamated: three from Peterborough; one each from Ashburnham, Lakefield, Norwood, and Hastings. In May 1886, the companies stationed at Ashburnham, Keene, Norwood, and Hastings were moved to Peterborough, and the Battalion henceforth was viewed by the public as a city, not a country, unit. By General Order 105, 1900, the Battalion was designated as the 57th Regiment, Peterborough Rangers. In World War I, its members on Active Service took part in various C.E.F. Battalions. Upon reorganization in August 1920, the designation "Peterborough Rangers" was maintained. A more general reorganization of the militia occurred in 1936, where the 3rd Prince of Wales Canadian Dragoons, the 57th Peterborough Rangers, and 'C' Company of the 4th Canadian Machine Gun Battalion were amalgamated to form the Prince of Wales Rangers (Peterborough Regiment). In June 1940, the Regiment was authorized to mobilize `Headquarters Company' for service with the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders of the 3rd Division. In August 1940, men were taken for the Active Service Force. Another mobilization for active service followed in 1942. As part of this, (May 14, 1942) the 1st Battalion went to Niagara-on-the-Lake, and thence, in June 1942, to British Columbia, and to Europe in 1944 as a reinforcement Battalion. Following the end of World War II, the 2nd Battalion was deactivated, and the 1st Battalion resumed its role as a militia unit. In 1947, the Regiment ceased to exist as an infantry unit, and became part of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, being designated as the 50th Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Prince of Wales Rangers, Royal Canadian Artillery. Further adjustments and reorganization ensued. On August 22, 1955, it became the 50th Medium Anti-Aircraft Regiment (the Prince of Wales Rangers), and on June 6, 1960, was reorganized and designated as the 50th Field Artillery Regiment, Prince of Wales Rangers, Royal Canadian Artillery, being equipped with the Mm. Howitzer. On July 6, 1960, the 45th Field Battalion from Lindsay was attached to the Peterborough unit; on December 16, 1964, the 14th Field Battery was amalgamated with the unit. As of March 31, 1970, the regiment was reduced to NIL strength, and was transferred to the Supplementary order of Battle.

A. Douglas Vaisey

  • Person

A. Douglas Vaisey (1920-2014) worked for several years within the court system in Peterborough, Ontario and was an active member of Grace United Church. He was adult advisor of the Kala-Chi-Hi-Y Club of the Peterborough Young Men's Christian Association, a member of the Peterborough Humane Society, and executive member of The House of Four Seasons. He was an avid long-distance walker.

A. Jeffrey & Son

  • Corporate body

Andrew Jeffrey was a long term resident of Cobourg, Canada West. He is mentioned in the book "Cobourg Early Days and Modern Times" as being nominated as an elder of the Presbyterian Church in 1827. He was elected to the Board of Police in 1837 after the town became incorporated. In the same year, as a member of the Board of Trade, he and other merchants decided to close their businesses at 7 pm from December 22, 1837 to April, 1838 in order to have the benefits that businessmen in Toronto and Montreal enjoyed. He was a councillor in 1851 and Mayor in 1852. He kept a private school at the corner of King and D'Arcy Streets. Throughout this time he ran a Foundry and later a Hardware Store. Cobourg has named a street after A. Jeffrey. In 1853 A. Jeffrey had his son-in-law, Robert Kingan, open a branch store in Peterborough (Taken from: Kidd, Martha Ann. Peterborough's Architectural Heritage, p 26.) (Please see other Peterborough histories in order to find more information on the Kingan branch of the Jeffrey family.)

Aboriginal Strategy Circle in the Kawarthas

The Aboriginal Strategy Circle in the Kawarthas (ASCK) evolved from the Urban Aboriginal Strategy Circle (UASC) which was formed in the spring of 2005. UASC was brought together by the local Aboriginal organization, Whitepath Consulting and Counselling Services, and was comprised of such members as Trent University Native Studies Department, the Ontario Metis Aboriginal Association, Peterborough Social Planning Council, and other organizations. ASCK was focused on identifying the needs of Aboriginal Peoples in the Peterborough and Kawarthas area. The goals of ASCK are listed as follows:

  • To provide opportunities for Aboriginal people to share their thoughts, ideas, experience and opinions that could affect positive change in the future
  • To strengthen and support the capacity of current and developing Aboriginal organizations through partnerships and training
  • To facilitate communication and provide information-sharing among Aboriginal organizations and to advise City and County service providers on how best to support Aboriginal people
  • To research, prepare and provide educational information on topics related to the issues identified through consultation with Aboriginal people
  • To develop a fund and criteria for long-term projects and/or needs of Aboriginal people.

Ad Hoc Committee to Save Algonquin Park

The Ad Hoc Committee to Save Algonquin Park was formed in response to the 1991 announcement by the Ontario Minister of Natural Resources that Algonquin Park would be opened to "unlimited recreational hunting and fishing and unlimited access by trucks, ATV's and snowmobiles to the over 1,000 members of the Golden Lake Indian band." (taken from Bulletin #1, June 15, 1991).

Addison family

  • Family

The Addison family members are descendants of Mark Robinson, Ranger and Superintendent of Algonquin Park from 1907-1936. Ottelyn Addison is the daughter of Mark Robinson, and was born in 1909. Her children are William D. Addison, Peter M. Addison, and Edward M. Addison. Ottelyn spent her childhood summers in Algonquin Park, and has written two books about Algonquin Park, "Early Days in Algonquin Park", and "Tom Thomson, The Algonquin Years". She was also editor of "The Young Naturalist" and "The Richmond Hill Naturalist Bulletin". Ottelyn currently lives in Aurora, Ontario.

Adele and Dr. J. Harry Ebbs

  • Family

Dr. J. Harry Ebbs was born in 1906, Worksop, England and moved to Peterborough, Ontario with his family in 1912. He became interested in camping through the Y.M.C.A., and, later, at the age of 17, became more involved in camping as a counsellor, in 1924, at Camp Ahmek in Algonquin Park. Throughout his university career, he continued to work as a camp counsellor at Camp Ahmek, and later at Camp Wapameo, both Taylor Statten Camps. He graduated from the faculty of medicine, University of Toronto in 1931 and his medical career led him to remote settlements in northern Canada and to hospitals in India and Malaysia. He was later the senior staff physician at the Hospital for Sick Children, a professor of pediatrics and a director of the school of physical and health education at the University of Toronto. From 1938 to 1975 he was the medical director of the Taylor Statten Camps. It was while working as a counsellor at the Taylor Statten Camps that he met his future wife Adele Statten, daughter of Taylor Statten. They were married in 1935 and together had three children: Barbara Adele, Alice Susan, and John William. Throughout their lives, the Ebbs have been involved in organized camping in Canada and the United States, as well as in India. Both were honorary life members of the Canadian Camping Association and Dr. Ebbs was a governor of Trent University, where the Ebbs Camping Archives were established in 1979 to honor the Ebbs' contributions to the children's camping movement in Canada. Dr. John Henry Ebbs died June 1, 1990 after suffering a stroke the previous year.

Adele Ebbs

  • Person

Adele Ebbs was born in Toronto in 1909, the daughter of Ethel Mary Page and Taylor Statten, founder of The Taylor Statten Camps. In 1935, Adele married Harry Ebbs, who was a counsellor at one of her father's camps. Throughout their lives, the Ebbs were involved in organized camping in Canada and the United States, as well as in India. Both were honorary life members of the Canadian Camping Association and Dr. Harry Ebbs was a governor of Trent University, where the Ebbs Camping Archives were established in 1979 to honor the Ebbs' contributions to the children's camping movement in Canada.

Aikenhead Hardware Company

  • Corporate body

In 1830 a new hardware store, also known as an ironmongery, was opened on the north-east corner of King and Yonge Streets in York (now Toronto), known as Ridout's Hardware Store. In 1845 a Board of Trade was organized and George P. Ridout was named its first president. In 1845 James Aikenhead joined the firm of Ridout Bros. & Co. In 1868 James Aikenhead became a member of the firm which at this point was renamed to Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. On September 1, 1873 James' son Thomas E. Aikenhead started to serve a five year apprenticeship with Mrs. Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. In 1891 Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie sold their lease on the corner of King and Yonge Streets and moved to Adelaide Street East. In 1893 Thomas E. Aikenhead purchased the business and it became known as Aikenhead Hardware Co. In 1901 the business was reorganized as a limited stock company known as Aikenhead Hardware Limited. By 1930 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was situated on Temperance Street and had been there since 1905. By this point in time the business had six floors of merchandise and a warehouse for stock. It sold everything from tacks to tractors to cutlery and locks. In 1937 the company started to open branch stores in different communities in the Toronto area. They later expanded to the greater Toronto area and outside of it to such communities as Burlington, St. Catharines, Kitchener, Dundas, Markham and Sudbury. James T.E. Aikenhead, son of Thomas E. Aikenhead, joined the company in 1911 and took over from his father in 1944 as president. He died suddenly in 1948 and his brother J. Wilfred Aikenhead took over the presidency which he was still holding in 1969. In 1965 Aikenheads's purchased the hardware chain of Russell Hardware Company Limited and continued to expand. (Taken from: Histories on Aikenheads, Folder 2.) By 1996 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was known as Aikenheads Improvement Warehouse Inc. with its corporate office located on Ellesmere in Toronto and stores located in Scarborough, Markham, Woodbridge, Brampton and Oakville.

Aileen Young

  • Person

Aileen Young is a descendant of the Young's Point pioneers and has a keen interest in the local history of Peterborough and its surrounds.

Alan Brunger

  • Person

Professor Alan Brunger was educated in England (B.Sc. Hons. Southampton 1963) and came to Canada in 1964 for graduate work, first in Alberta (M.Sc. Calgary 1966) and later in Ontario (Ph.D. Western Ontario 1973). He joined the faculty in Geography at Trent University in 1969 and has lectured and undertaken research mainly in historical geography within Canada, Australia and South Africa. His main research interest is in the pattern and process of nineteenth century immigration and settlement. Professor Brunger retired from the Geography Department at Trent University in 2008.

Alan J. Slavin

  • Person

Alan J. Slavin is a professor of physics at Trent University, and an adjunct professor at Queen's University. He received a M.Sc. from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. from Cambridge University, and is the recipient of the following academic awards: Trent University's Symons Award for Excellence in Teaching (1992), 3M Teaching Fellowship, and Ontario Lieutenant-Governor's Award for Teaching (1993), and Canadian Association of Physicists Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (1996). Slavin was a member of Kawartha Ploughshares.

Alex Edmison

  • Person

Alex Edmison was born in Cheltenham, Ontario in 1903. His ancestors were among the first settlers in Peterborough County. Edmison attended Queen's University and McGill Law School, graduating from the bar in Quebec in 1932. He was an alderman in Montreal and chief legal council for the Montreal Prisoner's Aid and Welfare Association until being commissioned with the Black Watch, Royal Highland Unit, in 1940. From 1946-1959, Edmison was a director of the John Howard Society, and from 1950-1959, Assistant to the Principal at Queen's University. Edmison served on the National Parole Board in Ottawa until his retirement in 1971. He was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1976 for his contributions in the field of criminology. Edmison was appointed to the first board of governors at Trent University in 1964 and remained an active, honorary member until his death in 1979.

Alexander Geerardt Mörzer Bruyns

  • Person

Alexander Geerardt Mörzer Bruyns was born in Holland in 1877 and emigrated to Canada in 1925 where he was recognized as a distinguished authority on agricultural affairs. Upon immigrating, he settled in Limehouse, Ontario and became a farmer and stock breeder, later moving to Acton, and then to Georgetown. He was chairman of the Live Stock Improvement Association and the Milk Producers Association. He was also author of the book, The Good Husbandry Dollar, and several articles related to agriculture. Mörzer Bruyns died in Georgetown, Ontario in 1955.

Alfred O.C. Cole

  • Person

Alfred O.C. Cole was born in 1925 and was the youngest son of Dr. C.E. Cooper Cole and Sarah Renwick Tuckett. He had three brothers and one sister, and was married to Jean Murray Cole. They had six children. Cole was an avid researcher and historian. He played a major role in the life and history of Trent University, as Registrar from 1966 to 1987, and as a member of the Department of History. He was a RCAF pilot during World War II, a political reporter for Toronto's Daily Star and Globe and Mail, and he served as an executive assistant in the Ontario Ministry of Public Works at Queen's Park in Toronto. He wrote articles, and books such as A Victorian Snapshot and Trent: The Making of a University, 1957-1987, both published in 1992. He and his wife, Jean, shared the editorialship of a number of books including The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough which was published in 1975 and Kawartha Heritage, published in 1981. Alfred O.C. Cole died on October 20th, 1996.

Alfred Tennyson De Lury

  • Person

Alfred Tennyson De Lury was born at Manilla, Canada West, on May 13, 1864 to Irish immigrant parents. He was educated at the University of Toronto where he received his B.A. (1890) and his M.A. (1902). He became a mathematics lecturer at University of Toronto in 1892, Head of the Mathematics Department in 1919, and he held the position of Dean of the Faculty of Arts from 1922 to 1935. Throughout his life he collected Irish literature and maintained associations with prominent Irish literary figures, including William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Yeats, John Butler Yeats and other family members, George Russell, and John and Malcolm Magee. De Lury was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1918 and he was the author of several algebra and arithmetic textbooks. He died at Lindsay, Ontario on November 12, 1951. His Irish literature collection is located at the University of Toronto Library.

Allan L. Sherwin

  • Person

Professor Allan L. Sherwin was Professor Emeritus of Neurology at McGill University and Attending Neurologist Emeritus at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. He was born in Montreal in 1932 and trained at McGill University. He received a Bachelor of Science in Honours Biochemistry (1953), Doctor of Medicine (1957), and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience (1965). He completed training as a Clinical Neurologist and became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 1963. He then practiced Neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute where he directed research into the causes and treatment of epilepsy. Professor Sherwin published two books and 140 scientific papers. For many years he was a neurologist at the Lachine General Hospital and often served as a neurological consultant to the nearby Mohawks of Kahnawake First Nation. In 2012 he published Bridging Two Peoples: Chief Peter E. Jones, 1843-1909, the biography of one of the first Aboriginals to obtain a medical doctors degree from a Canadian medical school (Queen’s University at Kingston in 1866). Professor Sherwin died in 2016.

Allan Percival Way

  • Person

Allan Percival Way (fl. 1921-1945), was a farmer who owned property in Murray Township, County of Northumberland. He also lived in Trenton, Ontario and was married to Florence Mildred Way.

Allen-Bellamy family

  • Family

Kenneth Charles Bellamy was born in 1919 in Cramahe Township, Northumberland County, the youngest son of Charles and Olive Bellamy (nee Bland). The Charles Bellamy family lived in the Smithfield/Brighton, Ontario area. Charles owned a farm in Salem, Ontario in his later years and in his younger years, worked for the Grand Trunk Railway as a brakeman. In 1938, Ken joined the Canadian Armed Forces and served overseas in World War II with the Midland Regiment, Hastings Prince Edward Regiment and the Essex Scottish regiment. Upon returning home, he married Ruth Catherine Allen. Over his career, he worked on the family farm, for the Department of Highways, and with Marbon Chemical Corporation in Cobourg, Ontario.

Ruth Catherine Allen was born in 1918 in Cramahe Township, the daughter of Durwood and Beatrice Allen (nee Hennessey). The Durwood Allen family lived on a farm in the Castleton, Ontario area. Ruth attended Peterborough Normal School in 1938 attaining her Teachers Certificate. During the course of her teaching career she taught in Morganston, Frankford, Napanee and South Cramahe Public Schools.

Ruth and Kenneth married 30 June 1947 in Brighton, Ontario. They had two daughters, Mary Margaret and Kathryn Ann, and lived in the community of Salem. After Ruth’s death in 1979, Ken married Joyce Blakley. Joyce died in 1985 and Ken in 2007. (Taken from information supplied by the donor).

Alternatives

  • Corporate body

Alternatives was an environmental policy magazine published at Trent between 1971 and 1983. In 1983 the University of Waterloo took over the publication. At Trent University it was published quarterly by the students and faculty. The purpose of the magazine was to confront the implications the environmental crisis had for economic structures, living habits and political processes etc. At the same time, the magazine wanted to pose and confirm the questions by offering imaginative and serious solutions.

Alvin Bee

  • Person

Alvin Bee was a farmer on Concession 1, Lots 26, 27, 28 in Hope Township, Douro County, in the early 1900s.

Amy Cosh

  • Person

Amy Cosh (1902-1967) was a Bobcaygeon librarian who requested that all Bobcaygeon men joining the Canadian Armed Forces in WWII send her their photograph. She assembled these in a scrapbook and added newspaper clippings containing any local information.

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