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People, Organizations, and Families

Aboriginal Strategy Circle in the Kawarthas

The Aboriginal Strategy Circle in the Kawarthas (ASCK) evolved from the Urban Aboriginal Strategy Circle (UASC) which was formed in the spring of 2005. UASC was brought together by the local Aboriginal organization, Whitepath Consulting and Counselling Services, and was comprised of such members as Trent University Native Studies Department, the Ontario Metis Aboriginal Association, Peterborough Social Planning Council, and other organizations. ASCK was focused on identifying the needs of Aboriginal Peoples in the Peterborough and Kawarthas area. The goals of ASCK are listed as follows:

  • To provide opportunities for Aboriginal people to share their thoughts, ideas, experience and opinions that could affect positive change in the future
  • To strengthen and support the capacity of current and developing Aboriginal organizations through partnerships and training
  • To facilitate communication and provide information-sharing among Aboriginal organizations and to advise City and County service providers on how best to support Aboriginal people
  • To research, prepare and provide educational information on topics related to the issues identified through consultation with Aboriginal people
  • To develop a fund and criteria for long-term projects and/or needs of Aboriginal people.

Ad Hoc Committee to Save Algonquin Park

The Ad Hoc Committee to Save Algonquin Park was formed in response to the 1991 announcement by the Ontario Minister of Natural Resources that Algonquin Park would be opened to "unlimited recreational hunting and fishing and unlimited access by trucks, ATV's and snowmobiles to the over 1,000 members of the Golden Lake Indian band." (taken from Bulletin #1, June 15, 1991).

William Peter Adams

  • Person

William Peter Adams was born in the United Kingdom in 1936, earned his B.A. at the University of Sheffield, and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. at McGill University. He is married, has four children, and lives in Peterborough. He was founder of the Department of Geography at Trent University. He was chair in that Department from 1968-1977 and remained a professor while also serving as Dean of Graduate Studies, Associate Dean of Science, Associate Vice-President, 1977-1987. He was elected M.P.P. for Peterborough, 1987-1990, and elected to the House of Commons in 1993 where he is currently serving. He has published numerous articles on the Canadian Arctic, on the environment and other geographical topics, and has written and co-authored books in the same field. He has also been significantly involved in health issues, sports and athletics.

Janet Adamson

  • Person

Janet Adamson, along with her husband Brian, purchased Camp Gay Venture in 1973. The previous owner was Robin Patterson who directed the camp from 1960-1973. Her father, Reverend John Hoyle, started the camp in 1946. Janet Adamson owned the camp until 2002 when it was sold. Janet Adamson's philosophy of non-competition was geared to building the confidence of every girl. Janet graduated from York University and worked for the Government Department of Manpower and Emigration before buying Camp Gay Venture. She has served as President of the Ontario Camping Association and on the Board of the Society of Camp Directors.

Addison family

  • Family

The Addison family members are descendants of Mark Robinson, Ranger and Superintendent of Algonquin Park from 1907-1936. Ottelyn Addison is the daughter of Mark Robinson, and was born in 1909. Her children are William D. Addison, Peter M. Addison, and Edward M. Addison. Ottelyn spent her childhood summers in Algonquin Park, and has written two books about Algonquin Park, "Early Days in Algonquin Park", and "Tom Thomson, The Algonquin Years". She was also editor of "The Young Naturalist" and "The Richmond Hill Naturalist Bulletin". Ottelyn currently lives in Aurora, Ontario.

Aikenhead Hardware Company

  • Corporate body

In 1830 a new hardware store, also known as an ironmongery, was opened on the north-east corner of King and Yonge Streets in York (now Toronto), known as Ridout's Hardware Store. In 1845 a Board of Trade was organized and George P. Ridout was named its first president. In 1845 James Aikenhead joined the firm of Ridout Bros. & Co. In 1868 James Aikenhead became a member of the firm which at this point was renamed to Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. On September 1, 1873 James' son Thomas E. Aikenhead started to serve a five year apprenticeship with Mrs. Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. In 1891 Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie sold their lease on the corner of King and Yonge Streets and moved to Adelaide Street East. In 1893 Thomas E. Aikenhead purchased the business and it became known as Aikenhead Hardware Co. In 1901 the business was reorganized as a limited stock company known as Aikenhead Hardware Limited. By 1930 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was situated on Temperance Street and had been there since 1905. By this point in time the business had six floors of merchandise and a warehouse for stock. It sold everything from tacks to tractors to cutlery and locks. In 1937 the company started to open branch stores in different communities in the Toronto area. They later expanded to the greater Toronto area and outside of it to such communities as Burlington, St. Catharines, Kitchener, Dundas, Markham and Sudbury. James T.E. Aikenhead, son of Thomas E. Aikenhead, joined the company in 1911 and took over from his father in 1944 as president. He died suddenly in 1948 and his brother J. Wilfred Aikenhead took over the presidency which he was still holding in 1969. In 1965 Aikenheads's purchased the hardware chain of Russell Hardware Company Limited and continued to expand. (Taken from: Histories on Aikenheads, Folder 2.) By 1996 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was known as Aikenheads Improvement Warehouse Inc. with its corporate office located on Ellesmere in Toronto and stores located in Scarborough, Markham, Woodbridge, Brampton and Oakville.

Allen-Bellamy family

  • Family

Kenneth Charles Bellamy was born in 1919 in Cramahe Township, Northumberland County, the youngest son of Charles and Olive Bellamy (nee Bland). The Charles Bellamy family lived in the Smithfield/Brighton, Ontario area. Charles owned a farm in Salem, Ontario in his later years and in his younger years, worked for the Grand Trunk Railway as a brakeman. In 1938, Ken joined the Canadian Armed Forces and served overseas in World War II with the Midland Regiment, Hastings Prince Edward Regiment and the Essex Scottish regiment. Upon returning home, he married Ruth Catherine Allen. Over his career, he worked on the family farm, for the Department of Highways, and with Marbon Chemical Corporation in Cobourg, Ontario.

Ruth Catherine Allen was born in 1918 in Cramahe Township, the daughter of Durwood and Beatrice Allen (nee Hennessey). The Durwood Allen family lived on a farm in the Castleton, Ontario area. Ruth attended Peterborough Normal School in 1938 attaining her Teachers Certificate. During the course of her teaching career she taught in Morganston, Frankford, Napanee and South Cramahe Public Schools.

Ruth and Kenneth married 30 June 1947 in Brighton, Ontario. They had two daughters, Mary Margaret and Kathryn Ann, and lived in the community of Salem. After Ruth’s death in 1979, Ken married Joyce Blakley. Joyce died in 1985 and Ken in 2007. (Taken from information supplied by the donor).

Kenneth Charles Bellamy

  • Person
  • 1919-2007

Kenneth Charles Bellamy was born in 1919 in Cramahe Township, Northumberland County, the youngest son of Charles and Olive Bellamy (nee Bland). The Charles Bellamy family lived in the Smithfield/Brighton, Ontario area. Charles owned a farm in Salem, Ontario in his later years and in his younger years, worked for the Grand Trunk Railway as a brakeman. In 1938, Ken joined the Canadian Armed Forces and served overseas in World War II with the Midland Regiment, Hastings Prince Edward Regiment and the Essex Scottish regiment. Upon returning home, he married Ruth Catherine Allen. Over his career, he worked on the family farm, for the Department of Highways, and with Marbon Chemical Corporation in Cobourg, Ontario.

Ruth and Kenneth married 30 June 1947 in Brighton, Ontario. They had two daughters, Mary Margaret and Kathryn Ann, and lived in the community of Salem. After Ruth’s death in 1979, Ken married Joyce Blakley. Joyce died in 1985 and Ken in 2007. (Taken from information supplied by the donor).

Ruth Catherine Bellamy

  • Person
  • 1918-1979

Ruth Catherine Allen was born in 1918 in Cramahe Township, the daughter of Durwood and Beatrice Allen (nee Hennessey). The Durwood Allen family lived on a farm in the Castleton, Ontario area. Ruth attended Peterborough Normal School in 1938 attaining her Teachers Certificate. During the course of her teaching career she taught in Morganston, Frankford, Napanee and South Cramahe Public Schools.

Ruth and Kenneth married 30 June 1947 in Brighton, Ontario. They had two daughters, Mary Margaret and Kathryn Ann, and lived in the community of Salem. After Ruth’s death in 1979, Ken married Joyce Blakley. Joyce died in 1985 and Ken in 2007. (Taken from information supplied by the donor).

Alternatives

  • Corporate body

Alternatives was an environmental policy magazine published at Trent between 1971 and 1983. In 1983 the University of Waterloo took over the publication. At Trent University it was published quarterly by the students and faculty. The purpose of the magazine was to confront the implications the environmental crisis had for economic structures, living habits and political processes etc. At the same time, the magazine wanted to pose and confirm the questions by offering imaginative and serious solutions.

Captain Thomas Gummersall Anderson

  • Person

Captain Thomas Gummersall Anderson, Superintendent of Indian Affairs (1830-1845), was born at Sorel, Quebec, on November 12, 1779, the son of Captain Samuel Anderson, of the Royal Regiment of New York. His first wife was Mar-pi-ya-ro-to-win (Grey Cloud), a descendent of Sioux Chief Wahpasha, and they had three children; his second wife was Elizabeth Ann Hamilton (1796-1858). After serving an apprenticeship with a merchant at Kingston, Upper Canada, he went into the fur trade at Michilimackinac; and in 1814 was in command of a party of volunteers that re-took Prairie-du Chien from the Americans. After the War he was appointed as an officer of the Indian Department, with the rank of Captain. He was stationed in turn at Drummond Island, Penetanguishene, Coldwater, and Manitoulin Island. In 1845 he succeeded Colonel S.P. Jarvis as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Canada West; and he held this post until his retirement in 1858. He died at Port Hope on February 10, 1875.

Joyce Anderson

  • Person

Joyce Anderson (nee Grant) was born 13 May 1938 in Bobcaygeon, Ontario. She married Douglas Anderson in 1960 and they lived in Bobcaygeon on their farm, “Sunnybreeze,” The Andersons had two children, Kim and Mark. Joyce Anderson worked as a music and piano teacher. Her mother was a Cairnduff.

C.E. Smith Boots and Shoes

  • Corporate body

C.E. Smith Boots appears in the Farmers and Business Directory for the Counties of Durham, Northumberland, Ontario, Peterboro, and Victoria, 1890. It is listed under Ontario County in a town with a population of 275 called Zephyr. Clinton E. Smith Boots and Shoes later appears in Vernon's City of Peterborough (Ontario) Directory for 1926, and was located at 384 George Street, Peterborough. The company does not appear in the 1936 Directory, but rather lists Agnew's Shoes located at that address.

Edward C. Caddy

  • Person

Edward C. Caddy (1815-1897) was a land surveyor who learned his trade in Peterborough between 1839 and 1842. He was also a painter in the Trent Valley District. His landscapes were primarily in water colour.

Gilbert and Stewart Bagnani

  • Family

Gilbert Forrest Bagnani was born April 26, 1900, in Rome, to General Ugo Bagnani, of Rome and later London as military attache at the Italian Embassy, and Florence Dewar, daughter of Dr. James Dewar of Cobourg, Ontario. Gilbert spoke both English and Italian and later learned to speak Greek, Latin, Arabic, French and German. He was educated at the Nobile Collegio del Nazzareno in Rome and at a preparatory school called Gibbs' in London. His schooling was interrupted by World War I. He served as a Second Lieutenant of artillery towards the end of the War. After the War he returned to the University of Rome where he received his doctorate. Instead of entering law as he had planned, he turned to the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens to study antiquities which were becoming a strong interest of his. In 1929 Gilbert married Mary Augusta Stewart Houston of Toronto, daughter of Stewart Houston (editor of "The Financial Post") and Augusta Robinson (daughter of John Beverley Robinson, Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, and granddaughter of Sir John Beverley Robinson, Chief Justice and Attorney-General of Upper Canada). Stewart's father died while she was young and her mother took her to Europe for a more cosmopolitan education than she could receive in Canada. Gilbert and Stewart had an apartment in Rome and for seven seasons worked, in the Sahara Desert, with the Royal Archaeological Mission to Egypt. In 1937 they fled fascist Italy and purchased a 200 acre farm and house built around 1845 near Port Hope, Ontario and named it "Vogrie". They added a large, forty foot long, two storeys high addition in which they housed their library, oil paintings, drawings, tapestries and ceramics. In 1945 Gilbert was invited to teach ancient history at the University of Toronto and in 1958 he became a Professor. He retired from the University of Toronto in 1965. During the time that the Bagnanis were in Toronto, Gilbert was a founding member and president of the Oriental Club of Toronto, a supporter of the Art Gallery of Ontario and an active member of the Archaeological Institute of America, of which he was vice-president from 1951 to 1954. Stewart was head of Extension at the Art Gallery of Ontario from 1951 to 1963. In 1965 the Bagnanis returned to "Vogrie". In the same year, Gilbert was asked to accept a term-appointment at Trent University. He was honoured with a LL.D. by Trent in 1971 and he continued to teach as a Professor of Ancient History until 1975. During the period between 1965 and 1975 Stewart remained active, lecturing on art in various venues and developing the Mackenzie Gallery at Trent University. Gilbert and Stewart did not have children. On February 10, 1985 Gilbert Forrest Bagnani died. Stewart moved to their Toronto home. In May of 1996 Mary Stewart Houston Bagnani died. The "Vogrie" property was inherited by Trent University after the death of Gilbert in 1985. Antiquities, art works, furniture, books and documents were bequeathed to a number of institutions, including Trent University, after the deaths of Gilbert and Stewart Bagnani.

Hugh Caldwell

  • Person
  • 1888-1889

Hugh Caldwell Sr. (1824-1903) emigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1843 to the Waterloo area with his father and siblings. He married Ann Nancy MacDonald (1832-1903) in 1855 and settled in Mornington Township, Perth County. In January 1867, he sold his farm and tenant farmed near Strathroy, Ontario for some months before purchasing Lots 16 and 17, Concession 13 in Chandos Township, Peterborough County where he settled in December of that year. In 1875, he was appointed to the position of property assessor for Chandos, Anstruther, and Burleigh townships and held this position at various times until 1890. He opened the first post office in the Clydesdale Settlement of Chandos Township in his house; His son, Hugh Caldwell Jr. [1861-1914] lived part of his adult life in the Emo, Ontario area. Hugh Caldwell Sr. was the great-great grandfather of Leonard Caldwell and his siblings. Hugh Caldwell Jr. was a great uncle.

Sir Henry Earle

  • Person

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Henry Earle was born at Brook Farm, Lancashire, England, August 15, 1854, the eldest son of the second Baronet of Allerton Tower and Emily Fletcher. He was educated at Eton; Trinity College, Oxford; and received an Honours M.A. from Cambridge. He joined the British Military, 3rd Battalion, in 1869, and was made a companion of the Distinguished Service Order in 1887. Earle served in the Jowaki Campaign, 1877; the Afgan War, 1878-1880; the Egyptian War, 1882; the Burmese Expedition, 1886-1887; the Ruby Mine Column, 1886; the Mainloung Expedition; and with the Yorkshire L.I. in the Frontier Campaign in Tirah, where he became severely wounded, 1899-1900. In 1900 he succeeded his father and became the 3rd Baronet of Allerton Tower. He continued to serve in the army from 1914 to 1916. In 1891 he married Evelyn Grace Boileau. He died July 16, 1939. (taken from "Who Was Who, 1929-1940". London: Adam and Charles Black, 1941.)

David R. Cameron

  • Person
  • 1941 -

Professor David R. Cameron (1941- ) was born in British Columbia and educated at the U.B.C. and the London School of Economics. He came to Trent University in Ontario to teach in the Political Studies department and became Chair of the department and Dean of Arts and Science. He was the Director of Research for the Pepin-Robarts Task Force on Canadian Unity. He held several senior government positions including Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs in the Ontario Government and Special Advisor to Premier David Peterson on Constitutional Reform. He was appointed Vice President of Institutional Relations and is a Professor of Political Science now at the University of Toronto. He is the author of many articles and several books including "Nationalism and Self-Determination and the Quebec Question" and "Taking Stock: Canadian Studies in the Nineties."

Early Canadian Life

  • Corporate body

"Early Canadian Life" was published 12 times a year in Oakville, Ontario. It was distributed nationally through a distributing company which was a subsidiary of MacLean-Hunter Ltd. It was published by Goldenglow Publications Ltd. and had a large readership throughout Canada.

Energy Savers Peterborough

  • Corporate body

The Energy Savers Peterborough (ESP) was established in May, 1982. It was founded to promote energy conservation in the City and County of Peterborough. ESP was a project that was considered one of-a-kind and was studied by the Ontario Ministry of Energy and Conservation as a way to make communities more energy efficient. It was started in the 1980's due to the wealth of information on energy conservation which was confusing people due to all the different sources and resources. The idea behind ESP was to sort the information out and give it to people at a local level and thereby increase community awareness of energy conservation. In their first year of operation ESP established a storefront in Peterborough Square, on the Corner of Water and Charlotte Streets, where they were able to give free non-partisan advice. They also offered successful workshops for arena and curling rink operators, energy saving seminars to churches, clinics for local media members and fleet operators on how to drive to save gas, a tire-check program and tours of solar-heated homes in the area. ESP helped the local Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) Residential Energy Advisory Program (REAP) establish conservation consciousness in the community. The ESP committee was chaired by Professor Peter Adams of Trent University.

Mary S. Edgar

  • Person

Mary Susanne Edgar was born on May 23, 1889, the daughter of Joseph Edgar and Mary Little, in Sundridge, Ontario. She was educated at the Sundridge Public School and the Barrie High School. Later she studied at Havergal Ladies College, Toronto, and took extension courses at the University of Chicago. She also took lectures at the Teachers' College, Columbia University, and graduated from the National Training School of the Young Women's Christian Association, New York City, in 1915. From 1912 to 1914, Mary Edgar was engaged in First National Girls' Work, Y.W.C.A., in Canada. From 1915 to 1919 she was Girls' Work secretary in Montreal, and Director of Camp Oolahwan in the Laurentians. In 1920, she spent four months in Japan doing volunteer work for the Y.W.C.A. In the same year, Mary Edgar purchased a large property on Lake Bernard, where she developed as a girls' camp, near her hometown of Sundridge. The camp, Glen Bernard Camp, was opened in the summer of 1922 with thirty-eight campers. Ms. Edgar was the Camp's Director, a position which she held until her retirement in 1956. Mary Edgar devoted much of her life to work in the field of camping and girls' work. Beside working with the Y.W.C.A., Mary also worked with the Canadian Girls in Training (C.G.I.T.), the Girl Guides of Canada, the Canadian Camping Association, and the Ontario Camping Association. Mary Edgar is the author of several books including "Wood-fire and Candlelight" (Toronto, 1945), "Under Open Skies (Toronto, 1956), "The Christmas Wreath of Verse" (Toronto, 1967), and "Once there was a Camper" (Toronto, 1970). She also wrote a number of one act plays and hymns. Her best known hymn is "God Who Touchest Earth with Beauty" which has been placed into hymnals around the world and has been translated into several languages, including Cree. Mary S. Edgar died at Toronto on September 17, 1973. (Taken from the finding aid for the Edgar Papers at Queen's University Archives.)

Adele Ebbs

  • Person

Adele Ebbs was born in Toronto in 1909, the daughter of Ethel Mary Page and Taylor Statten, founder of The Taylor Statten Camps. In 1935, Adele married Harry Ebbs, who was a counsellor at one of her father's camps. Throughout their lives, the Ebbs were involved in organized camping in Canada and the United States, as well as in India. Both were honorary life members of the Canadian Camping Association and Dr. Harry Ebbs was a governor of Trent University, where the Ebbs Camping Archives were established in 1979 to honor the Ebbs' contributions to the children's camping movement in Canada.

John Erskine

  • Person

John Erskine was a merchant (Glasgow Warehouse) in Peterborough, Canada West, in the mid 1800's.

Earl of Durham

  • Person

John George Lambton was born in Berkeley Square, London on April 12, 1792. He was the eldest son of William Henry Lambton, of Lambton, County of Durham, M.P. for the City of Durham and Lady Anne Barbara Frances Villiers, second daughter of George, fourth Earl of Jersey. He was educated at Eton. He inherited the family estate in 1797 and on June 8, 1809 was gazetted a cornet in the 10th Dragoons. He became a lieutenant in 1810 and retired from the position in 1811. In September of 1813 he was elected to the House of Commons and remained there until his elevation to peerage in 1828. He was created Baron Durham of the City of Durham and Lambton Castle by letters patent. In 1830 he was sworn a member of the privy council and he was appointed lord privy seal. This took place with the formation of the administration of Earl Grey who was the father of Durham's second wife. In 1832 Durham was appointed ambassador extraodinare to St. Petersburg, Berlin and Vienna. He returned to England a month later. In 1833 he resigned from all positions and was created Viscount Lambton and Earl of Durham. He was the first Earl of Durham. After this creation Durham became involved again in politics and once more he was appointed as ambassador extraorinare to St. Petersburg in 1835. He resigned in 1837 and was invested with the order of G.C.B. at Kensington Palace. In 1837 Durham was appointed high commissioner to Lower and Upper Canada in order to help resolve differences. He arrived at Quebec in May. In 1838 he resigned from this post and returned to England. He died July 28, 1840. (Taken from: "Dictionary of National Biography." Vol. XI. Great Britain: Oxford University Press, 1960.)

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