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People, Organizations, and Families
Corporate body

57th Regiment, Peterborough Rangers

  • Corporate body

The 57th Batallion of Infantry was gazetted in 1867. In total, seven independent companies were amalgamated: three from Peterborough; one each from Ashburnham, Lakefield, Norwood, and Hastings. In May 1886, the companies stationed at Ashburnham, Keene, Norwood, and Hastings were moved to Peterborough, and the Battalion henceforth was viewed by the public as a city, not a country, unit. By General Order 105, 1900, the Battalion was designated as the 57th Regiment, Peterborough Rangers. In World War I, its members on Active Service took part in various C.E.F. Battalions. Upon reorganization in August 1920, the designation "Peterborough Rangers" was maintained. A more general reorganization of the militia occurred in 1936, where the 3rd Prince of Wales Canadian Dragoons, the 57th Peterborough Rangers, and 'C' Company of the 4th Canadian Machine Gun Battalion were amalgamated to form the Prince of Wales Rangers (Peterborough Regiment). In June 1940, the Regiment was authorized to mobilize `Headquarters Company' for service with the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders of the 3rd Division. In August 1940, men were taken for the Active Service Force. Another mobilization for active service followed in 1942. As part of this, (May 14, 1942) the 1st Battalion went to Niagara-on-the-Lake, and thence, in June 1942, to British Columbia, and to Europe in 1944 as a reinforcement Battalion. Following the end of World War II, the 2nd Battalion was deactivated, and the 1st Battalion resumed its role as a militia unit. In 1947, the Regiment ceased to exist as an infantry unit, and became part of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, being designated as the 50th Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Prince of Wales Rangers, Royal Canadian Artillery. Further adjustments and reorganization ensued. On August 22, 1955, it became the 50th Medium Anti-Aircraft Regiment (the Prince of Wales Rangers), and on June 6, 1960, was reorganized and designated as the 50th Field Artillery Regiment, Prince of Wales Rangers, Royal Canadian Artillery, being equipped with the Mm. Howitzer. On July 6, 1960, the 45th Field Battalion from Lindsay was attached to the Peterborough unit; on December 16, 1964, the 14th Field Battery was amalgamated with the unit. As of March 31, 1970, the regiment was reduced to NIL strength, and was transferred to the Supplementary order of Battle.

A. Jeffrey & Son

  • Corporate body

Andrew Jeffrey was a long term resident of Cobourg, Canada West. He is mentioned in the book "Cobourg Early Days and Modern Times" as being nominated as an elder of the Presbyterian Church in 1827. He was elected to the Board of Police in 1837 after the town became incorporated. In the same year, as a member of the Board of Trade, he and other merchants decided to close their businesses at 7 pm from December 22, 1837 to April, 1838 in order to have the benefits that businessmen in Toronto and Montreal enjoyed. He was a councillor in 1851 and Mayor in 1852. He kept a private school at the corner of King and D'Arcy Streets. Throughout this time he ran a Foundry and later a Hardware Store. Cobourg has named a street after A. Jeffrey. In 1853 A. Jeffrey had his son-in-law, Robert Kingan, open a branch store in Peterborough (Taken from: Kidd, Martha Ann. Peterborough's Architectural Heritage, p 26.) (Please see other Peterborough histories in order to find more information on the Kingan branch of the Jeffrey family.)

Aikenhead Hardware Company

  • Corporate body

In 1830 a new hardware store, also known as an ironmongery, was opened on the north-east corner of King and Yonge Streets in York (now Toronto), known as Ridout's Hardware Store. In 1845 a Board of Trade was organized and George P. Ridout was named its first president. In 1845 James Aikenhead joined the firm of Ridout Bros. & Co. In 1868 James Aikenhead became a member of the firm which at this point was renamed to Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. On September 1, 1873 James' son Thomas E. Aikenhead started to serve a five year apprenticeship with Mrs. Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. In 1891 Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie sold their lease on the corner of King and Yonge Streets and moved to Adelaide Street East. In 1893 Thomas E. Aikenhead purchased the business and it became known as Aikenhead Hardware Co. In 1901 the business was reorganized as a limited stock company known as Aikenhead Hardware Limited. By 1930 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was situated on Temperance Street and had been there since 1905. By this point in time the business had six floors of merchandise and a warehouse for stock. It sold everything from tacks to tractors to cutlery and locks. In 1937 the company started to open branch stores in different communities in the Toronto area. They later expanded to the greater Toronto area and outside of it to such communities as Burlington, St. Catharines, Kitchener, Dundas, Markham and Sudbury. James T.E. Aikenhead, son of Thomas E. Aikenhead, joined the company in 1911 and took over from his father in 1944 as president. He died suddenly in 1948 and his brother J. Wilfred Aikenhead took over the presidency which he was still holding in 1969. In 1965 Aikenheads's purchased the hardware chain of Russell Hardware Company Limited and continued to expand. (Taken from: Histories on Aikenheads, Folder 2.) By 1996 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was known as Aikenheads Improvement Warehouse Inc. with its corporate office located on Ellesmere in Toronto and stores located in Scarborough, Markham, Woodbridge, Brampton and Oakville.

Alternatives

  • Corporate body

Alternatives was an environmental policy magazine published at Trent between 1971 and 1983. In 1983 the University of Waterloo took over the publication. At Trent University it was published quarterly by the students and faculty. The purpose of the magazine was to confront the implications the environmental crisis had for economic structures, living habits and political processes etc. At the same time, the magazine wanted to pose and confirm the questions by offering imaginative and serious solutions.

Annapolis Royal

  • Corporate body

Annapolis Royal (Port Royal) in Nova Scotia is the site of the first European settlement in Canada. It was settled three years before Quebec City in Quebec and two years before Virginia in the United States. A settlement was established in 1605 in the Annopolis Basin by the French. At first it consisted of a wooden palisade, a few small huts or homes and a church. A Governor's house was added to the fort and buildings for munitions and military personnel. Most of the settlers lived outside of the fort area. Eventually the fort was rebuilt of earth and then stone. By 1671 there were approximately 68 families living in Annapolis Royal and by 1686 the population had reached 231 civilians. By arms or treaty the settlement changed hands between the French and the English a total of seven times. In 1710 the English captured Annapolis Royal for the last time. The Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 had the French give her possessions of Acadia and Newfoundland to the Crown of Britain forever. In 1710 Annapolis Royal had been captured by General Nicholas who was later to become the Governor of all of Nova Scotia in 1714. Annapolis Royal was governed by Colonel Vetch of the 1710 war. In 1714 the Queen encouraged Governor Francis Nicholson to allow the French residents to retain their land and tenements or to sell their land. English settlement was encouraged. In 1719 Colonel Phillips replaced Governor Nicolson. By 1720 there were approximately 12 English families living in Annapolis Royal near the fort. (Taken from: MacVicar, W.M. "A Short History of Annapolis Royal, the Port Royal of the French..." Toronto: The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, 1897. microfiche CIHM 09502.)

Arbor Theatre

  • Corporate body

Arbor Theatre began in Peterborough in 1976 when John Plank arrived to direct "The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds" for the Peterborough Theatre Guild. The following year, local support led to the creation of Arbor Productions and John Plank directed "Private Lives" followed by "Belle of Amherst" and "Lady Audley's Secret" in 1978. In 1979 the group was reorganized as a professional theatre company performing during the summer season at Trent University's Wenjack Theatre.

Archivia

  • Corporate body

The Library and Archives Canada was established in 1872 to acquire and preserve materials of lasting national significance.

Association for Canadian Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) was founded in 1973 at Queen's University as a Pan-Canadian, non-profit organization which sought to promote a knowledge of Canada at the post-secondary level through teaching, research, and publications. A founding member of the International Council for Canadian Studies, the ACS is also a member of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and the Social Science Federation of Canada. The objectives of the Association was to promote multidisciplinary and comparative perspectives, and to encourage exchanges and co-operation between the numerous programs, centres, study groups, institutes and other organizations working in the field of Canadian, Quebec, and regional studies.

Association of Canadian Universities For Northern Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS) was founded in 1977 at Churchill, Manitoba and legally incorporated in March, 1987. The main founder of the Association was Professor Trevor Lloyd. Members include Universities across Canada, of which Trent University is one, that have an interest in Northern Studies. The Association does four types of work. It offers mutual assistance among member-universities in research, shared use of facilities, interchange of staff and students, the provision and use of libraries, preparation of bibliographies etc.; provision of assistance to northern residents through research, teacher training and higher education; makes available the knowledge, skills and services of universities to the Governments of Canada, the Provinces and Territories and to industry and the community at large; and, contributes towards Canada's international commitments for scientific information and research on the polar regions and increasing the exchange of scholars, students and information between polar countries. (Taken from: ACUNS - AUCEN Constitution and By-laws, 1979, page i.) The association has held annual conferences since 1979 at Chicoutimi, Quebec (1979), Trent University (1980), Calgary, Alberta (1981), Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario (1982) and at Regina in Saskatchewan (1983).

Beavermead Park

  • Corporate body

Beavermead Park is located on the east shore of Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario, on land that was once owned by Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald.

Beaverton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Belleville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Belmont municipal telephone system

  • Corporate body

The Belmont Municipal Telephone System began operation in 1922 in Havelock, Belmont Township, Ontario. This new system preceeded the Bell Telephone Company and the Havelock-Cordova Telephone Company in Belmont Township. It served subscribers for 33 years. In 1953, the Bell Telephone Company entered into negotiations with the Belmont Municipal System to re-acquire the system.

Benson Mills

  • Corporate body

Benson Mills was a large grist mill which was owned and operated by John Robinson Benson, husband of Catherine Evans Lee. He purchased the mill from Adam Scott. J.R. Benson was one of ten children in a family that settled in Peterborough.

Beta Sigma Phi (Peterborough, Ontario)

  • Corporate body

Founded in 1931, Beta Sigma Phi is an international women's organization that focuses on stimulating personal growth and development of its members through cultural and social programs and through service to others. Members volunteer for such activities as blood donor clinics, daffodil day, and meals on wheels. The organization supports various charities. Beta Sigma Phi was established in Peterborough in 1944.

Better Bait Company

  • Corporate body

The Better Bait Company was situated at 631 Lundy's Lane in Peterborough, Ontario. The company claimed to be the manufacturers of quality fishing tackle. The owner and operator was Perce Dyer, a Peterborough resident in the 1940s.

Birdsall Collection of Bookbinders' Finishing Tools / Emrys Evans & Rachel Grover

  • Corporate body

The Birdsall collection of bookbinders' finishing tools was acquired by the Rare Books Department at the University of Toronto in 1968. The Birdsall collection was started when William Birdsall purchased the bookbinding business of John Lacy and Son in Northampton, England, in 1792. The new establishment consisted of a bindery, a book store, a circulating library, a post office and insurance and banking were transacted on the side. William brought his sons, James and Robert, into the business in 1823 and by 1826 James was the sole owner since his brother and father had both died. In the 1840's Anthony, a great-nephew of the founder William, bought the business and his son Richard entered the business in 1857. Anthony died in 1893 and Richard continued the business under the name of Birdsall & Son. The firm became a private company after 1915 when the descendants of Anthony and Richard took over the firm. Each successive generation expanded on the collection of tools and styles of bookbinding with developing interests in preservation, restoration and the history of books and bookbinding. The University of Toronto acquired the collection when the last member of the Birdsall firm died leaving behind the firm's vast collection of bookbinding tools and paperwork. (Taken from: Evans, Emrys and Rachel Grover. Birdsall Collection of Bookbinders' Finishing Tools. Toronto: Department of Rare Books & Special Collections, 1972.)

Bobcaygeon Road

  • Corporate body

In 1852, William Lyon Mackenzie introduced to the Legislative Assembly a resolution asking for a survey of the Huron-Ottawa Territory. His intent was to increase settlement within the uninhabited region of Canada West, to encourage immigration from Europe, and discourage emigration from the province. This resolution, along with similar recommendations, led to the Colonization Roads policy, and ultimately to the passing of the Public Land Act in 1853 by the Legislature. This Act allowed the government "to appropriate as free grants any public land in the province to actual settlers, upon or in the vicinity of any public roads in any new settlements which shall or may be opened through the Lands of the Crown." The survey of the Bobcaygeon Road came about as a result of this legislation. Before 1854, the Bobcaygeon Road did not extend beyond the village of Bobcaygeon. By 1857, the road had been constructed to Kinmount. A year later, surveyor Michael Deane was commissioned by the Department of Crown Lands to conduct a survey of lot frontages along the proposed Bobcaygeon Road from just north of Kinmount (Somerville Township) to Bell's Line. In 1860, surveyor Crosbie Brady was hired to survey the Bobcaygeon Road from where Deane had left off, north of Bell's Line, to Nippissing Road Line, on the south shore of Lake Nippissing. Throughout the years, the road and the lots along either side of the road have been re-surveyed for the purpose of establishing specific boundaries and correcting any mistakes in the initial surveys. All that remains of the original Bobcaygeon Road today is Highway 649 which extends from the village of Bobcaygeon to Highway 121, south of Kinmount. (Taken from: Spragge, George W. "Colonization Roads in Canada West." "Ontario History." Vol. XLIX, no. 1, 1957., and W. D. Thomas. "Bobcaygeon: The Hub of the Kawarthas." Bobcaygeon: W. D. Thomas, 1980.)

Bobcaygeon-Nipissing Road

  • Corporate body

In 1852, William Lyon Mackenzie introduced to the Legislative Assembly a resolution asking for a survey of the Huron-Ottawa Territory. His intent was to increase settlement within the uninhabited region of Canada West, to encourage immigration from Europe, and discourage emigration from the province. This resolution, along with similar recommendations, led to the Colonization Roads policy, and ultimately to the passing of the Public Land Act in 1853 by the Legislature. This Act allowed the government "to appropriate as free grants any public land in the province to actual settlers, upon or in the vicinity of any public roads in any new settlements which shall or may be opened through the Lands of the Crown." The survey of the Bobcaygeon Road came about as a result of this legislation. Before 1854, the Bobcaygeon Road did not extend beyond the village of Bobcaygeon. By 1857, the road had been constructed to Kinmount. A year later, surveyor Michael Deane was commissioned by the Department of Crown Lands to conduct a survey of lot frontages along the proposed Bobcaygeon Road from just north of Kinmount (Somerville Township) to Bell's Line. In 1860, surveyor Crosbie Brady was hired to survey the Bobcaygeon Road from where Deane had left off, north of Bell's Line, to Nippissing Road Line, on the south shore of Lake Nippissing. Throughout the years, the road and the lots along either side of the road have been re-surveyed for the purpose of establishing specific boundaries and correcting any mistakes in the initial surveys. All that remains of the original Bobcaygeon Road today is Highway 649 which extends from the village of Bobcaygeon to Highway 121, south of Kinmount. (Taken from: Spragge, George W. "Colonization Roads in Canada West." Ontario History. Vol. XLIX, no. 1, 1957., and W. D. Thomas. Bobcaygeon: The Hub of the Kawartha's. Bobcaygeon: W. D. Thomas, 1980.)

Bowmanville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Bracebridge, Ontario: Fire Insurance Plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Brighton Township

  • Corporate body

Brighton Township was created by an Act in 1851. It is bounded on the north by Seymour Township; on the west by Cramahe Township; on the east by Murray Township and on the south by Lake Ontario. It is part of the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham. The Village of Brighton was incorporated in 1890 but existed well before then. Built on the Brighton Harbour as a point of entry it had a population of 500 in 1850 and 1700 in 1878. In 1850 it had two grist mills, a plaster mill and a tannery. By 1878 it had four churches and a school. The early settlers were the Singletons, Thayers, Proctors, Butlers, Lockwoods, Wills, Dr. Gross, Sanfords and Ketchums. John Lockwood was the first postmaster of the village. Brighton Harbour used to be known as Freeman Point and Gosport.

Brighton Women's Auxiliary

  • Corporate body

The first meeting of the Brighton Women's Auxiliary was held in January, 1895 at the Anglican Parsonage. The President was Caroline M. Westmacott, presumably the wife of A.G.E. Westmacott, Church of England clergyman in Brighton at the time.

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