Showing 903 results

People, Organizations, and Families

David Newhouse

  • Person

David Newhouse is Onondoga from the Six Nations of the Grand River community near Brantford, Ontario. He is Chair of Indigenous Studies at Trent University and Associate Professor, Indigenous Studies & Business Administration. Newhouse was founding editor of the CANDO Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development; past Chair and a current member of the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO) Standing Committee on Education; a member of the Policy Team on Economics for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples; a member of the Independent Panel on Access Criteria for the Atlantic Fisheries for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans; a member of the National Aboriginal Benchmarking Committee of the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board; and, the Science Officer for the Aboriginal Peoples Health research committee for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. (Information taken from Trent University Web site, 08 September 2011).

David R. Cameron

  • Person
  • 1941 -

Professor David R. Cameron (1941- ) was born in British Columbia and educated at the U.B.C. and the London School of Economics. He came to Trent University in Ontario to teach in the Political Studies department and became Chair of the department and Dean of Arts and Science. He was the Director of Research for the Pepin-Robarts Task Force on Canadian Unity. He held several senior government positions including Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs in the Ontario Government and Special Advisor to Premier David Peterson on Constitutional Reform. He was appointed Vice President of Institutional Relations and is a Professor of Political Science now at the University of Toronto. He is the author of many articles and several books including "Nationalism and Self-Determination and the Quebec Question" and "Taking Stock: Canadian Studies in the Nineties."

David R. Morrison

  • Person

David R. Morrison was born in 1941. He held several positions at Trent University: Professor in the Department of International Development Studies and Department of Political Studies; Chair of the Association of the Teaching Staff; Dean of Arts and Science; Dean of Arts and Science and Provost; President and Vice-Chancellor (acting); Vice-President Academic (interim); and Director of the Trent International Program. He received an Eminent Service Award at Trent University in 2007. For further information about the career of David R. Morrison, visit the following web page: https://www.trentu.ca/ids/faculty-research/dr-david-morrison (last visited 13 September 2017).

Davidson family

  • Family

James Davidson was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1801, the son of Hugh Davidson. In 1823, James Davidson came to Canada with his sister. They settled first with an Uncle in Smith Township. In 1831, James settled on lot 20, concession 5, Smith Township, and established his own 200 acre farm. He married Elizabeth McConnell of Cavan Township the same year. They had four sons and four daughters: Ann, Hugh, William, Mary Jane, Sarah, James Jr., Robert, and Fanny. In 1837, Davidson fought in the Rebellion. Robert eventually went into the hardware business in Peterborough, Hugh and James Jr. went into farming, and William became a grocer and flour merchant. Elizabeth Davidson died in 1864 and James Davidson died sometime after after 1884. (Taken from: "History of the County of Peterborough." Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1884.)

Dawn and Denis Smith

  • Family

Professor Dawn L. Smith was born in London, England, in 1932 and studied French and Spanish at Oxford University from 1952 to 1955. She emigrated to Canada in 1961. She received her D.Phil in Spanish Literature from Oxford University in 1975 and taught Spanish at Trent until her retirement in 1996. She currently holds the position of Professor Emeritus of Hispanic Studies. She is the author of numerous articles on the Spanish Comedia and has edited a critical edition of Tirso de Molina's La mujer que manda en casa.

S.G. Denis Smith was born in 1932 in Edmonton. In 1953 he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Honours, from McGill University. At McGill he received the J.W. McConnell Scholarship and an I.O.D.E. post-graduate scholarship for Oxford University in England. From 1953 to 1956 Denis attended Oxford University and obtained his Master's Degree and a Bachelor of Literature. While in Oxford he received an Exhibition Scholarship and a grant from the Bryce Fund to travel and study in Poland. In 1956 he returned to Canada and by 1962 had written a number of papers and reviews on political material. Denis Smith has held a number of university positions throughout his career. He was with the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto, 1956 to 1957; Department of Political Science, York University, 1960 to 1961 and was the first Registrar of that University. He held the Vice-President's position at Trent University from 1964 to 1967. He was Master of Champlain College from 1969 to 1971 and a professor in the Department of Political Studies to 1983 when he left to teach and become Dean of Social Sciences at the University of Western Ontario. At Trent he was Chairman of the Politics Department from 1967 to 1968. He was editor of the Journal of Canadian Studies from 1966 to 1975; editor of the Canadian Forum from 1975 to 1979 and President of the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association from 1975 to 1977. He has written several books including: Bleeding Hearts, Bleeding Country, 1971; Gentle Patriot, 1973; Diplomacy of Fear, 1988; Rogue Tory, 1995; Prisoners of Cabrara, 2001; Ignatieff's World: A Liberal Leader for the 21st Century?" 2006; Ignatieff's World Updated: Iggy goes to Ottawa" 2009; and General Miranda’s Wars: Turmoil and Revolt in Spanish America, 1750-1816, 2013.

Dawn L. Smith

  • Person

Professor Dawn L. Smith was born in London, England, in 1932 and studied French and Spanish at Oxford University from 1952 to 1955. She emigrated to Canada in 1961. She received her D.Phil in Spanish Literature from Oxford University in 1975 and taught Spanish at Trent until her retirement in 1996. She currently holds the position of Professor Emeritus of Hispanic Studies. She is the author of numerous articles on the Spanish Comedia and has edited a critical edition of Tirso de Molina's La mujer que manda en casa.

Deloro Mine

  • Corporate body

Mining in Deloro began in 1868 when gold was discovered. In 1873 Canadian Consolidated Gold Mining Company, a British-based company, began mining operations which eventually failed due to the poor recovery of gold. In 1896 Canadian Gold Fields Company bought the property and the first mill was built. The operations were successful in the beginning as new cyanide technology was used to extract the gold and roasting furnaces were built to remove the arsenic from the gold. The mill was closed in 1903 due to the poor grade of the gold.

Denis Smith

  • Person

S.G. Denis Smith was born in 1932 in Edmonton. In 1953 he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Honours, from McGill University. At McGill he received the J.W. McConnell Scholarship and an I.O.D.E. post-graduate scholarship for Oxford University in England. From 1953 to 1956 Denis attended Oxford University and obtained his Master's Degree and a Bachelor of Literature. While in Oxford he received an Exhibition Scholarship and a grant from the Bryce Fund to travel and study in Poland. In 1956 he returned to Canada and by 1962 had written a number of papers and reviews on political material. Denis Smith has held a number of university positions throughout his career. He was with the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto, 1956 to 1957; Department of Political Science, York University, 1960 to 1961 and was the first Registrar of that University. He held the Vice-President's position at Trent University from 1964 to 1967. He was Master of Champlain College from 1969 to 1971 and a professor in the Department of Political Studies to 1983 when he left to teach and become Dean of Social Sciences at the University of Western Ontario. At Trent he was Chairman of the Politics Department from 1967 to 1968. He was editor of the Journal of Canadian Studies from 1966 to 1975; editor of the Canadian Forum from 1975 to 1979 and President of the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association from 1975 to 1977. He has written several books including: Bleeding Hearts, Bleeding Country, 1971; Gentle Patriot, 1973; Diplomacy of Fear, 1988; Rogue Tory, 1995; Prisoners of Cabrera, 2001; Ignatieff's World: A Liberal Leader for the 21st Century?, 2006; Ignatieff's World Updated: Iggy goes to Ottawa, 2009; General Miranda’s Wars: Turmoil and Revolt in Spanish America, 1750-1816, 2013; and, A Dissenting Voice: Essays, Addresses, Polemics, Diversions, 1959 - 2015, 2017.

Dennis Dickens Sweeting

  • Person

Dennis Dickens Sweeting (1915-2000) was born in Calgary, Alberta. He was the second child of John Findlay Sweeting and Jessie Craven Dickens. Sweeting was a professional actor from the age of 38 and was founding director of Kawartha Summer Theatre (1964). He was producer/artistic director of Canadian Players, and president of the Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists. He also organized the Actor's Equity Association of Canada and served as reeve of Lindsay and ward of Victoria County. Sweeting received his BA from Trent University in 1980, and was recipient of the Maggie Basset Award (1988), an honorary degree from Trent University (1990), and the Order of Canada (1994).

Dennis Patrick Sears

  • Person

Dennis Patrick Sears was born in Vancouver in 1925. As a young boy he moved to Saskatchewan near Moose Jaw, where he witnessed an event at the age of six which was to affect his entire life, that of the killing of the hired hand by his father. His father was never charged, and the family moved to central Ontario in Carden Township in 1933. Upon finding hundreds of books stored in his grandfather's house, Sears developed an early interest in reading. In 1943 he joined the navy, and after the World War II, became a policeman in Oshawa. He had already married and had three children, but left his family and job and moved to Calgary, where he continued a troubled life. He soon joined the army and was sent to Kingston to serve in the plainsclothes division of the Provost Corps. Years later he began operating a lift bridge in Kingston, where, in his spare time, he found a renewed interest in literary matters. Soon he was sending letters to the Kingston Whig-Standard, where a favorable response by the editors lead to a regular column, beginning in 1971. Some years later, several of his columns were combined in a book entitled "The Lark in the Clear Air". He has written other books since.(Taken from an article by Ron Base, entitled "Dennis Patrick Sears Grows Up", in Maclean's, June 1975).

Denoon family

  • Family

The Denoon family arrived in Peterborough between 1871 and 1883. In 1883 William Denoon lived north of Hunter and west of George, pt 7 as a tenant. In 1887 William was working with livestock presumably in the butchering business since by 1890 he is a butcher. He died in Ashburnham 30 May 1891 of consumption at the age of 39. By 1896 Mrs. William and John Denoon were running the butcher business. The Denoons were butchers for approximately 23 years (1887-1910). By 1926 Elizabeth Denoon (widow of William) lived with Kenneth M. Denoon. Kenneth was a gardener and was a home owner on the north side of Lansdowne Street. By 1936 and 1937 only Kenneth M. Denoon can be found living in Peterborough with his wife Lola Y. and still living on the north side of Lansdowne Street. In 1937 Kenneth is a farmer. Presumably John and Kenneth M. Denoon were children of William and Elizabeth Denoon. (This information is found in the Peterborough County Directories located in the Trent University Archives.)

Department of Labour

  • Corporate body

The Department of Labour came into existence with the passing of the Conciliation Act of 1900. The original objectives of the Department were the preparation and publication of the "Labour Gazette"; settlement of industrial disputes under the terms of the Conciliation Act; promotion of fair wage payment and proper conditions; and administration of the Alien Labour Acts. Initially, the administration of the Department was the responsibility of the Postmaster General, until 1909, when the Office of the Minister of Labour was established under a separate Cabinet portfolio. Additional responsibilities have been added to the Department over the years. It was involved in the creation of a system of national employment offices after 1918; and after 1926, in the implementation of Canada's first old age pension plan. In 1940, the Department began to administer unemployment insurance. After 1945, it became increasingly involved in the creation, planning, and administration of the Canada Labour Code. (Taken from: "Government Archives Division: General Guide Series." Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, 1991.)

Department of Railways and Canals

  • Corporate body

The Department of Railways and Canals was created in 1879 by extracting from the Department of Public Works its Railway Branch and the operational responsibilities for canals administered by the Office of the Chief Engineer, and combining them to form a new ministry composed of the two branches (the Railway Branch and the Canal Branch). The Railway Branch was responsible for the construction, operation, and maintenance of government-owned railways, and administered a program of financial assistance designed to encourage railway companies to construct new lines. The Canal Branch supervised the operation, maintenance, and enlargement of the Canadian Canal System and undertook the construction of new canals when required. In 1936, the Department of Railways and Canals was amalgamated with the Department of Marine and the Civil Aviation Branch of the Department of National Defence to form the Department of Transport. (Taken from: Canada. "National Archives General Guide Series: Government Archives Division." Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, 1991.)

Deryck M. Schreuder

  • Person

Deryck M. Schreuder, born in 1942, is a Professor of History who received his Ph.D. from Oxford University. He joined Trent University's History Department in 1970 as an associate professor and he became the Chairman of the Department in 1978. He retained this position until 1981, when he left Trent University. He is the author of several books including "Gladstone and Kruger: Liberal Government and Colonial `Home Rule' 1880-1885", 1969 and "The Scamble for Southern Africa, 1877-1895: The Politics of Partition Reappraised."

Diane Forrest

  • Person

Diane Forrest was born in 1955 in Mississauga and grew up in Lorne Park and Toronto. She graduated from the University of Toronto in 1977 with a 4-year arts degree. She worked primarily as a freelance writer in the magazine industry, winning three gold National Magazine Awards, three silvers and numerous honourable mentions, along with many other awards for her writing. Most of her work was in “service journalism,” providing information and education on a variety of issues, from how to pack a suitcase to land claims. Her most frequent clients were Maclean’s, Cottage Life, and Moneywise/Financial Post Magazine. She also wrote, edited, and contributed to a number of short books. In 2004, she switched to financial services, writing and editing in the marketing field. Forrest also wrote and produced a number of short plays for the Toronto Fringe Festival and the Alumnae Theatre Company, a women’s community theatre. At Alumnae she worked in programming, dramaturgy, marketing, training and development, and founded the Write Now playwriting event and the New Play Development Group.

Dickson family

  • Family

Samuel Dickson was born in 1809 in County Cavan, Ireland. He emigrated from Ireland to Peterborough in 1830 and became employed by James Hall as a distiller. In 1840 he built a saw mill on the Otonabee and owned all the land from Parkhill (Smith Rd.) to the bridge on Hunter Street on both sides of the river. He married Ann Holmes and they had ten children: one son and nine daughters of whom only six daughters survived. Samuel Dickson was on the Peterborough Council for four years. He built a number of houses and owned a large portion of Peterborough property. He died in 1870 when, while supervising the repair of a railway pier, he fell into the river and drowned. His daughters married and they and their husbands helped to run the lumber business. His eldest daughter, Mary Ann, married T.A. Hazlitt, who on the death of Samuel Dickson became the manager of the lumber business. Elizabeth married William Davidson and through her line the family maintained the lumber business. In 1906 the Dickson family sold some of their property and established the Peterborough Lumber Company which would give jobs to some of the older men from the Dickson Co. Samuel's grandson Dickson Davidson was the President of the new company. When he died Laura Davidson became President. At her death in 1957, Helen Munroe McCrae, became the President. She was a great granddaughter of Samuel Dickson.

Doane Family

  • Family

The Doane family were a Quaker family who settled in York County, probably in East Gwillimbury Township, as early as 1815. According to the 1878 Atlas of York County, the family held land on concession 3, lot 15, in that township, more or less equidistant from Sharon and Queensville Post Offices. Other members of the family branched out to North King Township (third concession, near the Holland River), to Pickering Township, Toronto, the United States, and in one case, to the Baptist Mission at Cocanada, Madras, India.

Don Tapscott

  • Person

Don Tapscott (b. 1947) is one of the world’s leading authorities on innovation, media, and the economic and social impact of technology; in this capacity, he advises business and government leaders around the world. In 2013 and 2015, Thinkers50 ranked him fourth among the world’s most influential management thinkers. In 2013, he was also awarded the Global Solutions Award for launching and leading the Global Solution Networks program based at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. Tapscott has authored or co-authored 15 widely read books including the 1992 bestseller Paradigm Shift. His 1995 The Digital Economy changed thinking around the world about the transformational nature of the Internet. Two years later he defined the Net Generation and the “digital divide” in another publication, Growing Up Digital. His 2000 work, Digital Capital, introduced seminal ideas such as “the business web”. Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything was the bestselling management book in 2007 and has been translated into over 25 languages. In his forward to Tapscott’s newest book, The Digital Economy: 20th Anniversary Edition (2014), Eric Schmidt (Executive Chairman, Google) writes: “Don remains one of the most perceptive thinkers about the way technology is transforming business and society. Several of his predictions—from networked intelligence to the demands on leaders to embrace technology — have taken permanent hold.” For over 30 years, Tapscott has introduced many ground-breaking concepts that are part of contemporary understanding. A Trent alumnus, his work continues as CEO of The Tapscott Group and a member of World Economic Forum. Don Tapscott was Chancellor of Trent University from 2013 to 2019. (Taken from the Trent University web site (http://www.trentu.ca/chancellor/), 25 March 2015).

Don Whiteside

  • Person

Don Whiteside (Sin-a-paw) was born in New York in 1931, the son of Thereon Harvey and Dorothy (Reid) Whiteside. He married Alvina Helen Adams in 1956 and had five children. A native author, Whiteside served with the United States military in Korea. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1967 and within a few years began working with the Canadian government in various departments: the Department of Regional Economic Expansion; the Department of Secretary of State; and the Department of Health and Welfare. He also taught at Manitou Community College and was director of the Ontario Genealogical Society. He died in 1993.

Donald B. Smith

  • Person

Professor Donald B. Smith is Professor Emeritus of History at University of Calgary. He was born in 1946 and is married to Nancy Townshend. He received a Ph.D. at University of Toronto in 1975 and has written several books related to the history of nineteenth century Canada and to Aboriginals in Canada, including Mississauga Portraits: Ojibwe Voices from Nineteenth Century Canada (2013); Honore Jaxon Prairie Visionary Regina (2007); Calgary's Grand Story: The Making of a Prairie Metropolis from the Viewpoint of Two Heritage Buildings (2005); Long Lance: The Glorious Imposter (1999); From the Land of Shadows: The Making of Grey Owl (1990); Sacred Feathers: the Reverend Peter Jones (Kahkewaquonaby) and the Mississauga Indians (1987), and others. In 2014, Professor Smith won the Floyd S. Chalmers Award for his book, Mississauga Portraits.

Doris M. Hancock

  • Person

Doris M. Hancock attended teacher training courses in the late 1920s offered through St. John's Church of England in Port Hope, Ontario.

Dorothy Choate Herriman

  • Person

Dorothy Choate Herriman was born in September of 1901 at Lindsay, Ontario, the daughter of William Choate Herriman (Medical Director of the Ontario Hospital, Orillia) and Nellie J. Williams (daughter of Lewis Williams of Johnstown, Pennsylvania). Her family is related to the Choates who were early pioneer settlers in the area. She spent her childhood in Kingston, Toronto and Orillia. She was educated at the Model School in Toronto, Orillia Central School, Orillia Collegiate Institute, Havergal College in Toronto and the Ontario College of Art. She served, for a time, as secretary to the Canadian Author's Association. She was a poet and published a volume of poetry entitled Mater Silva in 1929 by McClelland and Stewart. She had numerous other poems published in newspapers and literary journals in Canada and England. Dorothy died in 1978.

Dorothy Moir

  • Person

Dorothy Moir attended University of Toronto in the Faculty of Arts program and was enrolled in the 1st year Household Science course in the 1926-1927 academic year.

Douglas Sadler

  • Person

Douglas Sadler was born in London, England in 1916. He served in the 7th Armoured Division (Desert Rats) during World War II and with the Queen's Royal Regiment in Holland. He spent six months imprisoned in Oflag 79, Germany. It was during the World War II that Sadler met his future wife, Joan, in England. They were married in 1942. After the War, he served as a Captain in the Army and one of his tours took him to Singapore in 1947. He came to Canada in 1950 to work on Governor-General Vincent Massey's farm near Port Hope, Ontario and later worked for the Port Hope Evening Guide in advertising. This was the beginning of his newspaper career which ultimately led him to the Peterborough Examiner and the City of Peterborough in 1953. Part of his work at the Examiner included writing his now famous outdoor column, "Come Quietly With Me," which he wrote for more than 30 years. Douglas has written close to 1500 columns on every conceivable aspect of the environment. Late in his life, Douglas decided to return to school. He attended the old Peterborough Teacher's College, and upon graduation, began teaching with the Northumberland Board of Education. He later became the vice-principal of Warkworth School in 1969 and worked there for twelve years before taking a job as an outdoor education consultant. He then moved to the Peterborough County Board of Education. When the outdoor education program was cancelled in 1975, Douglas continued teaching at the Bailieboro School. At about the same time, Douglas became a member of the Peterborough Field Naturalists. After two years, he joined the Ontario Federation of Field Naturalists and was a member for sixteen years, two of which were spent as the Federation's president. Douglas has won the Frank Kortright Award twice and is an honorary life member of the Peterborough Field Naturalists. He earned a degree in geography in 1978 from Trent University and, in 1988, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from the same university. In 1987 he authored the book "Reading Natures Clues."

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