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People, Organizations, and Families

Peterborough Free Press

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Free Press was published by members of the Peterborough Newspaper Guild and university students concerned about the strike at the Peterborough Examiner. (Taken from: "The Peterborough Free Press." December 18, 1968.)

Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Historical Atlas was created by the Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation which started in 1974. The Foundation was formed to produce and to publish an Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875 in the 19th century manner in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the Peter Robinson settlers. The Foundation was chaired by Jane Deyman and A.O.C. Cole was the general editor. Jean Murray Cole was a co-editor. Professors Alan Brunger, Bruce Hodgins, R.B. Johnston, Elwood Jones and Gordon Roper, all of Trent University, helped to write various parts of the Atlas. When the Atlas was published in 1975 it received a number of awards such as a communications award from Heritage Canada; a local histories award from the Canadian Historical Association; and a local societies award from the Ontario Historical Society. The Foundation donated a number of copies of the Atlas to schools and, from the proceeds of the sale of the Atlas, the Foundation was able to give a number of gifts. The Foundation gave financial gifts to Hutchinson House, the Peterborough Historical Society, the Peterborough Public Library, Lang Pioneer Village, the Journal for Canadian Studies and Trent University. Trent also received an endowment fund called the Peterborough Historical Atlas prize which an undergraduate student would be able to win with the best written paper or project on a Canadian topic. The prize was to be awarded in Canadian Reference books. Not only did the Foundation publish the Atlas but it helped publish Kawartha Heritage in 1981. The Foundation wound up its activities in 1985.

Peterborough Horticultural Society

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Horticultural Society was established April 9, 1861 by a few gentlemen interested in horticulture. Within a few weeks time the new horticulture club was registered in Toronto. Rev. Vincent Clementi was the first president. The first exhibition, which consisted of exhibits of flowers, fruits and vegetables, was held September 20, 1861. The first two day show was held in 1872. In 1885 the Society, with the help of the Peterborough Council, started a town beautification project in the Court House park. In 1898 the first lawn and garden competition was held. Eventually the Society joined with other societies to form the Ontario Horticultural Society. There were junior members as well as the adult members.

Peterborough Humane Society

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Humane Society opened its doors to stray, sick and abused animals around the 1940's. The objectives of the Society were to prevent cruelty to animals and birds; to provide shelter and food for animals and birds which were lost, injured or abandoned; to provide unclaimed animals and birds with homes; to investigate complaints of cruelty to animals and birds; and to create public interest in humane work. The Society had a president, secretary, officers, a board of directors and a council as well as a women's auxiliary and affiliation with other societies such as the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies. The Humane Society formerly operated from a building on Townsend Street in Peterborough. In 1957, the shelter on Lansdowne Street was built.

Peterborough Law Association

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Law Association was incorporated in 1879 in order to enable the local bar to establish and receive grants from the law society for a law library in the court house. The local bar had a library and rented a library from a local firm for $12.00 a year. In 1893 the Association paid the firm $22.00 and removed their library from the firm. This left the library depleted and hence the application for grants from the Law Society. The Law Association in Peterborough developed committees to look after the library and had a chief librarian. It celebrated its one hundredth anniversary in 1979 with a dinner and notable guest speaker. Since its inception the Peterborough Law Association has received innumerable gifts and donations in the form of books and paintings such as books of Sir John Beverly Robinson from his son Christopher Robinson Q.C. and a set of Supreme Court Reports from USA President Calvin Coolidge.

Peterborough Lift Lock

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Lift Lock was started in1896 and finished in 1904. It opened the Otonabee River to navigationconnecting Rice Lake and the Kawarthas.(Taken from: Francis, Daniel."I Remember....An Oral History of the Trent-Severn Waterway."Peterborough: Friends of the Trent-Severn Waterway, 1984.) TheLift Lock is considered one of the great engineering projectsof the century and is the world's second highest lift lock. Thephotograph was produced as a souvenir from the town of Peterboroughto people who visited it.

Peterborough Light and Power Company

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Light and Power Company was a private electrical utility company that operated between 1884 and 1913 in the city of Peterborough. By 1913, it had a total of 2320 hydro poles in operation, and provided electricity for residences, streetlights, industries, and the street railway. It was expropriated by the city of Peterborough in 1913.

Peterborough miscellanea

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterborough County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Peterborough Newspaper Files

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Despatch (1845-1856) was published by George Haslehurst and had its offices at Hunter and Chambers Streets. The Peterborough Review was established in 1853 by Robert Romaine and his brothers-in-law, Thomas and Richard White. They owned the Review from 1856 to 1864. They bought the Despatch's files and equipment in 1856. The Review was sold to E.J. Toker and John Carnegie in 1878. The Review stopped publishing in 1921. The Peterborough Examiner was established 1856 by Augustus Sawers as Peterborough's reform paper, taking over from the Despatch. Robert Graham and James Renfrew bought the paper in 1859 and in 1864 James Stratton bought it. From 1877 to 1914 James Stratton's son ran the paper. The Peterborough Examiner is still running in 1996.

Frost family

  • Family

The Honourable Leslie Miscampbell Frost, lawyer and Premier of Ontario, was born in Orillia, Ontario on September 20, 1895, the son of William Sword Frost and Margaret Jane Barker. He was educated at the Orillia Public School and the Orillia High School. He later attended the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall. He served during World War I in France and Belgium, with the 20th Battalion, Queen's York Rangers, and was discharged with the rank of captain in 1918, after being severely wounded. Frost was called to the Bar in 1921. He was a member of the legal firm Frost, Inrig and Gorwill, among others, and was an honorary bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada. He married Gertrude Jane Carew (1894-1970), in 1926. They never had children. Leslie M. Frost had a long and successful political career. He was elected to the legislature of Ontario in 1937, and he was consistently re-elected at each election until his retirement in 1963. He was Treasurer of Ontario and Minister of Mines in both the George Drew and T.L. Kennedy administrations. In 1949, Frost was chosen leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, and was sworn in as Premier and Provincial Treasurer on May 4, 1949. He remained Provincial Treasurer until 1955 and Premier until 1961. Besides his legal and political career, Frost took on many other obligations. He was a member of the Board of Governors of the University of Toronto and the first Chancellor of Trent University. He also held several directorships, including: the Bank of Montreal, Air Canada, Corporate Investors Ltd., Lever Brothers Ltd., KVP Company Ltd., John Deyell Ltd., Canada Life Assurance Company, Victoria and Grey Trust Co., Massey-Ferguson Ltd., and radio station CKLY. Frost was also keenly interested in history, primarily military history and the histories of Victoria, Peterborough and Haliburton Counties. He was the author of several books: Fighting Men, Forgotten Pathways of the Trent, Pleasant Point Story: a History of Pleasant Point and The Records on Sam Hughes Set Straight. Leslie M. Frost died at Lindsay, Ontario 4 May 1973. Cecil Grey Frost, younger brother of the Honourable Leslie M. Frost, was born in Orillia, Ontario, on August 27, 1897. His father, William Sword Frost, operated a jewelry and watchmaking business in Orillia, and as Mayor, introduced the concept of daylight saving time to the municipality. Cecil Grey Frost served overseas with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps during the World War I. When he returned to Canada, he attended Osgoode Hall Law School and graduated in 1921. He and his brother Leslie then opened a legal firm in Lindsay, Ontario, and both soon became active in local Conservative Politics. This led to Cecil's election in 1936 as Mayor of Lindsay, and in 1937 to the Presidency of the Ontario Conservative Association, As well, he organized and managed Earl Rowe's campaign in the provincial election of 1937. Thought of as a potential party leader himself, Cecil Grey Frost remained politically active until his sudden death on 8 June 1947. Robert John “Jack” Beal (1919-1994) was Gertrude Jane Frost’s nephew. He was married to Eileen Beal; their son, Robert “Bob” Beal, is a journalist and historian.

Peterborough Normal School

  • Corporate body

Peterborough Normal School was officially opened on September 15, 1908 and operated until the late 1960's. The school was located in Peterborough, Ontario, and several hundred teachers were trained there over the years of operation. The first principal was Duncan Walker.

Peterborough, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Peterborough, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada, 1977.)

St. Andrew's Church

  • Corporate body

St. Andrew's Church, originally a Presbyterian Congregation, was formally organized in Peterborough in 1833 by Reverend J. Morrice Roger of the Established Church of Scotland. The first place of worship was a rented building located on the north side of King Street, west of Aylmer Street. On May 30, 1835, St. Andrew's Church received a Crown grant which included the land on which the church now stands. In 1836, the first church building was built, made entirely of stone quarried from property owned by the church. By 1884, it was decided by the congregation that a new church building was necessary. The cornerstone was laid June 29, 1885, and on May 2, 1886, the new St. Andrew's Church was formally opened and dedicated. In 1924, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church became St. Andrew's United Church.

Peterborough Social Planning Council

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Social Planning Council (PSPC) was developed to promote greater co-ordination between different providers of social services in Peterborough and area. It was to provide consumers of social services the opportunity to have input into the social system and to identify the needs and problems, and receive recommendations about services and activities. The PSPC was to build a data base, to be open to the public, with information of existing services. In 1978 the PSPC reported on the task force on Children's Services. It conducted various research projects on existing and future implementation of social services. It provided a community forum for preparation of briefs in response to the published intentions of governments. The PSPC monitored the emergence of urban and rural planning developments. It also encouraged and assisted groups establish programs in needed areas. The PSPC was located on King Street in 1978 in space given to them from the United Way office.

Peterborough Teachers' College

  • Corporate body

The first normal school for the training of elementary school teachers opened in Toronto in 1847. In 1850 a system of township model schools was established. They were specially designated elementary schools where teachers or potential teachers could observe existing practice under supervision. The successful candidates received Third Class Certificates valid for three years. In 1880 there were forty-seven model schools. Candidates were awarded First or Second Class Certificates after attendance at normal school. At times there were two year courses at normal schools. Model schools were abolished in 1924 and with them the Third Class Certificate. In 1936 the Second Class Certificate was discontinued except at the Ottawa Normal School. In 1874 the Ottawa Normal School was established and in 1900 the London Normal School. In 1908 normal schools were opened in Hamilton, Peterborough, and Stratford. Peterborough Normal School was officially opened on September 15, 1908 and operated until the late 1960's. Several hundred teachers were trained there over the years of operation. The first principal was Duncan Walker. In 1973 the Peterborough Teachers' College (formerly the Peterborough Normal School) closed its doors and the staff moved to the Faculty of Education, Queen's University.

Peterborough Women's Committee

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Women's Committee was a local organization which lobbied at various levels of government and also provided resource material on women's issues. The committee opened a resource centre for women, published a directory of services available locally for and by women, and held all-candidates' meetings. The committee was in existence between 1977 and 1987.

Peterborough's Architectural Heritage

  • Corporate body

Peterborough's Architectural Heritage was written by Martha Ann Kidd and published by the Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee in 1978. The Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee was established through a by-law made by the City of Peterborough after the Ontario Heritage Act of 1974 was passed by the Province of Ontario. Committee members consisted of Victor Barry, Edgar J. Boland, Teresa Bradburn, Eric V. Jackson, Martha A. Kidd, J.J. Overvliet, Eldon P. Ray, Jennie Spurway, Margaret Fleming and Betty Ross. The committee developed a number of guidelines for its activities and set out to compile a list of pre-1890 structures within the boundaries set by the Otonabee River, Parkhill Road, Park Street and Townsend Street. The list consists of photographs of the buildings and text containing information about the buildings architectural style and information about most of the homeowners. The list was compiled in order to aid Peterborough City Council in determining whether a permit for drastic exterior alteration or demolition should be issued for any of the properties. This list put the properties into the heritage designation category and was made available to anyone who wanted to see it. (Taken from: Kidd, Martha Ann. Peterborough's Architectural Heritage. Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee, 1979.)

Professor Michael Peterman

  • Person

Professor Michael Peterman was born in 1942 and taught in the English department at Trent University from 1972 to 2008. During this period, he served as Chair of the English Department, Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies, Principal of Traill College, and editor of the Journal of Canadian Studies. He is also author and editor/co-editor of several articles and books focused on Canadian and American literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. The books include such titles as: Susanna Moodie: letters of a lifetime (1985); Robertson Davies (1986); Letters of a lifetime / Susanna Moodie (1993); Forest and other gleanings: the fugitive writings of Catharine Parr Traill (1994); I bless you in my heart: selected correspondence of Catharine Parr Traill (1996); James McCarroll, alias Terry Finnegan: newspapers, controversy and literature in Victorian Canada (1996); Susanna Moodie: a life (1999); My old friend the Otonabee: glimpses by Samuel Strickland, Catharine Parr Traill & Susanna Moodie (1999); Winona, or, The foster sisters (2007); Sisters in two worlds: a visual biography of Susanna Moodie and Catharine Parr Traill (2007); The elusive Isabella Valancy Crawford (2009); Flora Lyndsay; or, passages in an eventful life (2014); and others. Professor Peterman received Trent University's Distinguished Research Award in 2000 and was elected a Fellow to The Royal Society of Canada in 2006.

United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria

  • Corporate body

The United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria were created in 1850 when a county system replaced the district system. In 1860 Victoria County separated from Peterborough County thus creating two separate counties.

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