Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Zaccheus Burnham

  • Person

Zaccheus Burnham was born February 20, 1777 in Dunbarton, New Hampshire, son of Asa Burnham and Elizabeth Cutler. He was raised in New Hampshire and came to central Upper Canada in 1797, eventually settling in Hamilton Township, Newcastle District. Several of his brothers also settled in the same area. On February 1, 1801, he married Elizabeth Choate, also of New Hampshire. Together they had six children, five daughters and one son. As soon as Burnham arrived in Upper Canada, he became interested in acquiring land and was eventually to become one of the largest land holders in the Newcastle District (he owned the land on which the village of Ashburnham is situated). He also carried out land surveys with his future son-in-law, land surveyor Richard Birdsall, which allowed Burnham to determine the best plots of land to acquire. As well, payment for land surveys was often in the form of land. By 1831, Burnham had a 1000 acre farm, plus thousands of acres of land scattered throughout the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, and Peterborough County. Burnham was also involved in the military. He joined the militia as a private in 1801. In the War of 1812 he was a captain. He remained active in the military as a member of the First Regiment of the Northumberland Militia, and as Colonel, led a large force to Toronto in response to the Rebellion of 1837. Burnham was also involved in many other activities and was a leading member in the community. He became a road commissioner for the Newcastle District in 1811. In 1813, he was appointed as a Justice of the Peace. He was also the Treasurer of the Newcastle District from 1815 to 1851, and he represented the riding of Northumberland and Durham in the House of Assembly from 1817 to 1820. In 1831 he was appointed to the Legislative Council by Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colbourne, and served there until 1841. In July 1839, he was made a Judge for the District court of Newcastle. Zaccheus Burnham died February 25, 1857, at Cobourg, Upper Canada. (Taken from: Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.)

Bury's Green Women's Institute

  • Person

Bury's Green Women's Institute of East Victoria District was founded in 1953. A branch member of the larger world-wide Women's Institutes organization, Bury's Green Women's Institute's focus was to strive "for all that is best "For Home and Country"". Activities in the community included raising money by means of card parties, bazaars, making and selling quilts, and entering local fairs. The Women's Institute donated money and food to the County Home, widows in Korea, and shut-ins at Christmas. The local 4-H Club came under the jurisdiction of the Women's Institute and was sponsored by it. The Institute disbanded in 2000. (Taken from the Tweedsmuir History)

Miscellanea photographic

  • Corporate body

This collection consists of a number of photographs which include John Butcher, sexton of St. John's Church in Peterborough. There is one photograph of his family outside their home as well as one photograph of John at age 34. There are also a number of photographs of the Hastings Lock, Healey's Falls and steam logging and boat with log boom. There is also one photograph of William Dawson's house in South Monaghan from 1910; a photograph of "Strathormond" in Peterborough and the Champion soccer team of Fairview School from around the 1970's.

Roger Buxton

  • Person

Robin (Roger) Allan Heineky Buxton was born in London, England on January 28, 1945, the son of Adam and Beetle Buxton. He and his wife, Judy Hazlett, lived in Markham, Ontario. A PhD physicist and Chair of the Ontario Association of Remote Sensing (OARS), Buxton was also a photographer and for a 25-year period beginning in the 1970s, hiked together with his wife into the Canadian and Greenland Arctic taking photographs. Locations visited include Ellesmere Island, Auyuittuq, Soper River, Frobisher Bay, Pond Inlet and Bylot Island, Baker Lake, Clyde River, Grise Fiord, Pangnirtung, and Greenland. Along with also being a pilot, oarsman, published writer, and skater, Buxton was involved with introducing speed skating to children of the Markham area and, in 2005, was awarded the Speed Skating Canada’s National Outstanding Administrators Award for this work. Buxton was also secretary of Markham’s Parkinson Support Group and he and Hazlett trained police forces throughout Ontario to assist those with Parkinson’s disease; for this work, they were awarded the Queen’s Jubilee Medal. Over many years, Buxton accompanied Trent Professor John Wadland on annual trips to Temagami and many of his photographs taken while on these trips are located elsewhere in Trent University Archives. He died on August 18, 2013. (Taken in part from an obituary published by Chapel Ridge Funeral Home, Markham, Ontario, and from information supplied by Professor John Wadland).

Gertrude Duncan

  • Person

Gertrude Duncan was a school teacher who taught in Coboconk, Ontario from 1924 to 1925.

Reverend Peter McLaren Duncan

  • Person

Peter McLaren Duncan (born ca. 1835] was the son of James Duncan, a blacksmith of Carrying Place, Canada West, and Catharine McLaren of Brighton, Canada West. Peter McLaren Duncan married Leonora Singleton of Brighton, Ontario. Peter was a minister of the Presbyterian Church in Colbourne. Of their children, it is known that there was a son, P.W. Duncan, who immigrated to the United States in 1895, and a daughter, Alice Duncan, who was an artist of some renown, and who married John MacDonald. Alice and John had no children. Peter McLaren Duncan died in approximately 1912 and his wife died between 1925 and 1930.

Fair family

  • Family

John and Mary Anne Fair had a number of children. The oldest daughter, Martha Jane Fair married William Hall. John and Mary Anne's second son was John Joseph Fair. Their youngest daughter was Caroline Fair and she held a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Dickson family

  • Family

Samuel Dickson was born in 1809 in County Cavan, Ireland. He emigrated from Ireland to Peterborough in 1830 and became employed by James Hall as a distiller. In 1840 he built a saw mill on the Otonabee and owned all the land from Parkhill (Smith Rd.) to the bridge on Hunter Street on both sides of the river. He married Ann Holmes and they had ten children: one son and nine daughters of whom only six daughters survived. Samuel Dickson was on the Peterborough Council for four years. He built a number of houses and owned a large portion of Peterborough property. He died in 1870 when, while supervising the repair of a railway pier, he fell into the river and drowned. His daughters married and they and their husbands helped to run the lumber business. His eldest daughter, Mary Ann, married T.A. Hazlitt, who on the death of Samuel Dickson became the manager of the lumber business. Elizabeth married William Davidson and through her line the family maintained the lumber business. In 1906 the Dickson family sold some of their property and established the Peterborough Lumber Company which would give jobs to some of the older men from the Dickson Co. Samuel's grandson Dickson Davidson was the President of the new company. When he died Laura Davidson became President. At her death in 1957, Helen Munroe McCrae, became the President. She was a great granddaughter of Samuel Dickson.

Michael Andrews Farrar

  • Person

The Reverend Michael Andrews Farrar was born in England in 1814. He died in Hastings, Ontario in 1876. He was a Church of England rector in Westwood, Norwood, and Hastings, Ontario, and was an accomplished artist.

Richard Dellamora

  • Person

Professor Richard Dellamora was born in 1944 in the United States. He received his education at Yale, Cambridge, and Dartmouth College. Dellamora is Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Trent University, where he also teaches in the graduate program in Culture, Theory, and Politics. He specializes in Victorian studies; history and theory of gender and sexuality; nineteenth- and twentieth-century cultural studies; critical theory; queer theory; Aestheticism and the Decadence; nineteenth-century comparative arts; and opera. He is the recipient of a number of awards and fellowships including fellowships from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Guggenheim Foundation. His publications include Masculine Desire: The Sexual Politics of Victorian Aestheticism (1990); Apocalyptic Overtures: Sexual Politics and the Sense of an Ending (1994); and three edited collections: Postmodern Apocalypse: Theory and Cultural Practice at the End (1995); The Work of Opera: Genre, Nationhood, and Sexual Difference (1997, co-editor with Daniel Fischlin); and Victorian Sexual Dissidence (1999). In 2004 he published Friendship's Bonds, a study of the attempt by Victorian writers (Eliot, Disraeli, Gladstone, Dickens, James and Trollope) to use the novel as a space in which to explore citizenship and political culture. In 2011, he published Radclyffe Hall: A Life in the Writing.

Federal Cultural Policy Review Committee

  • Corporate body

The Federal Cultural Policy Review Committee (F.C.P.R.C.) was created in August 1980 by the Honourable Francis Fox, Secretary of State and Minister of Communications, to review Canadian cultural institutions and cultural policy. This was the first such commission since the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences of 1949-1951. The F.C.P.R.C. grew from an Advisory Commission on Cultural Policy which had been established in November 1979 by the Honourable David MacDonald. The committee held public hearings and developed its own recommendations. Known as the Applebaum-Hebert Commission after Louis Applebaum and Jacques Hebert, the Final Report was released in 1982.

George Mellis Douglas

  • Person

George Mellis Douglas was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1875. He moved with his family in 1883 to Northcote Farm on the shore of Katchiwano Lake north of Lakefield, Ontario. In 1900 George went to work for his cousin, James Douglas, who was president of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. In 1911, at the suggestion of his cousin James, an expedition to the Coppermine River and Arctic Sea was planned, and George Douglas along with his brother Lionel and Dr. August Sandberg made the trip. The purpose of the expedition was to search for minerals in the watershed of the Coppermine above the Arctic Circle. What George and his associates discovered were huge copper deposits. Although it was known that the deposits existed since the 18th century, they were much larger than was suspected. George was also one of the first Barren Land explorers to extensively photograph the North-West Territories and the Inuit who lived in the region. Over the following thirty years, Douglas led copper explorations to the shores of the Arctic Sea and around the edges of the Great Bear and Great Slave Lakes. George also wrote about his explorations in the Arctic. He published articles in several professional journals and in 1914 he wrote "Lands Forlorn", an account of the 1911-12 expedition. George Mellis Douglas died at his home near Lakefield, Ontario in 1963.

Canada West. Peterborough County Census.

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterborough County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Canada. Peterborough County Census.

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterborough County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Deloro Mine

  • Corporate body

Mining in Deloro began in 1868 when gold was discovered. In 1873 Canadian Consolidated Gold Mining Company, a British-based company, began mining operations which eventually failed due to the poor recovery of gold. In 1896 Canadian Gold Fields Company bought the property and the first mill was built. The operations were successful in the beginning as new cyanide technology was used to extract the gold and roasting furnaces were built to remove the arsenic from the gold. The mill was closed in 1903 due to the poor grade of the gold.

Canada West. Victoria County Census.

  • Corporate body

Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2 169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it wasn't until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.)

Canada. Victoria County and Durham (East) County Census.

  • Corporate body

Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2 169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it wasn't until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.)

Canada Company

  • Corporate body

The Canada Company which was created by John Galt, was established in late 1824, and incorporated by the British Parliament on July 27, 1825. The purpose of the Company was to obtain land in Upper Canada and to promote the sale of such land to prospective settlers. In 1826 the Company purchased 2.5 million acres (1 million hectares) from the government for $295 000. Approximately half of the land lay within the Huron Tract and the rest of the land consisted of scattered crown reserves. The company was dissolved on December 18, 1953.

Fenian Raids

  • Corporate body

The Fenian Raids were a result of the Irish-American movement. The movement was created in 1857 by the Irish in an attempt to gain their independence from Britain. American John O'Mahony raised large amounts of money for the movement's leader James Stephens, who resided in Ireland, to use in Ireland to procure independence. The movement was popular with Irish-Americans and by 1865 there were approximately 10,000 Civil War Veterans organized into military clubs. They had approximately $500,000.00 and at this time split into two different factions. One led by John O'Mahony and the other led by William Roberts. A small Canadian group of Fenians was organized by Michael Murphy in Toronto. Roberts wanted to invade Canada and O'Mahony wanted to help Ireland. When no uprising occurred in Ireland O'Mahony led a raid on the New Brunswick border in the spring of 1866 which failed. Altogether there were 5 raids on, and into, the Canadas. There was another raid in June of 1866 led by Roberts who defeated the militia at Ridgeway near Niagara. The third raid also occurred in the same June at Missisquoi Bay. There were 2 raids in 1870 on the Quebec border led by John O'Neill. In 1867 there was an Irish uprising in Ireland which failed and with it the Fenian movement disintegrated. (Taken from: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Canada. Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Records. Red Series

  • Corporate body

Library and Archives Canada holds these records as R.G. 10 which is the Department of Indian Affairs from 1677-1978 and contains 1750.6 m of textual and graphic material.(See also General Guide Series 1983, Federal Archives Division in the Trent University Archives Reading Room.)

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