Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Trenton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Trent Valley Navigation Company (Limited)

  • Corporate body

The Trent Valley Navigation Company, Bobcaygeon, Ontario, was incorporated in 1883. Mossom Martin (Mossie) Boyd was the president of the company and he and his brother William owned nearly all of the stock. The company consisted of a fleet of a half dozen steamboats which operated along the waterways surrounding Bobcaygeon, carrying passengers and freight from Lindsay to Coboconk, Sturgeon Point, Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon. At Lindsay there was a connection with the Grand Trunk Railway. In the most productive years (after the turn of the century) revenue was almost evenly divided between passenger and freight transportation. The Company closed in 1915, precipitated by the death of Mossom Boyd the previous year.

Trent University

  • Corporate body

Trent University was formally created in 1963 by the Ontario Legislature. Located in Peterborough, Ontario, Trent opened its doors to its first students in 1964.

Trent Regional Ballet Association

  • Corporate body

Trent Regional Ballet Association was founded 2 October 1974. Its main goal was to encourage and promote dance in different forms. First directors of the corporation were J. Baker, M. Hull, J. Clarke, J.G. McCarney, M. Lester, B. Ross, C. Fulford, D. Popple, A. Kolisnyk, and C. Lester.

Trent Canal

  • Corporate body

In 1835, a proposal to build a navigable water route from Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay was submitted to Sir John Colborne, Lieutenant Governor, by civil engineer Nicol Hughe Baird. It was believed that if a link could be established between the many scattered settlements, the population would increase, and new markets would be created. With numerous arguments for and against the building of the Trent Canal, the project was begun, and was to take many separate projects over a period of almost one hundred years to complete. It was not until 1920 that the final link of the canal was completed, and water travel was made possible all the way from Trenton to Port Severn, a distance of 386 km. Although the original purpose of the building of the Canal had been to bring supplies to people living along its waterways, and to provide an outlet for timber, by the time the Canal was completed so many years later, the automobile and better roads and railways had been introduced and the original function of the Canal had changed. It has since become a famous route for recreational travel for thousands of people.

Townships of Sherborne and McClintock

  • Corporate body

The Townships of Sherborne and McClintock are located in the north-west corner of Haliburton County. They form part of the United Municipalities of Sherborne, McClintock and Livingstone which was created in 1979 and it has a population of approximately 500 people. Sherborne was the first of the Townships surveyed in 1862. It was named after the English town of Sherborne. McClintock was surveyed in 1876 and it was named after Sir Francis Leopold McClintock, the artic explorer. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places of Ontario, Part III, N-Z." Belleville: Mika Publishing Co., 1983.)

Township of Asphodel-Norwood

  • Corporate body

The Township of Asphodel-Norwood in the County of Peterborough was created in 1998 when municipalities in Ontario were reorganized and many amalgamations took place. The amalgamated Township was created from the former Township of Asphodel and the Village of Norwood.

Town & Gown Concerts

  • Corporate body

Town & Gown Concerts series ran from 1969-[1979], providing a unique and distinguished contribution to the musical life of the city of Peterborough and of Trent University, both artistically and in terms of audience support. A broad spectrum of musicians were presented, both professional and amateur, local and out-of-town. The programmes were varied, and the music ranged from baroque and classical to romantic and modern, including contemporary folk. Town & Gown Concerts reported to Trent University's Vice President Academic and the University provided some of the financial support for the series. Professor Joseph Wearing of Trent University was the first chairman of Town & Gown Concerts, followed by Professor Jim Henniger.

Tourism Development Through Recreational Events

  • Corporate body

The Tourism Development Through Recreation Events was a project which commenced from July 1981 and ended April 1982. The project aimed at determining the tourist potential of recreational events in both the City and County of Peterborough.The idea for the project was developed during the 1980 Ontario Summer Games. The impact of the Games, within the region, and across the province, was quite considerable in terms of drawing attention to the importance of recreational activities for the local tourism industry. The general objectives of the program were: 1) To provide an opportunity to consider the impact that recreational events of a regional nature have on the local tourist industry; 2) To become more deliberate in the planning of recreational events that are of tourist appeal; 3) To determine the number, type and scale of recreation-tourist events; 4) To provide resource material for organizations interested in giving this tourism component more serious consideration; and 5) To increase the tourist potential of many existing events through this project. As a result of the project, a twelve month planning calendar was created which outlined upcoming events. Also a series of recommendations were brought forth concerning the creation of a new Peterborough Kawartha Tourism Convention, the yearly production of the planning calendar, that a clearing house of local tourist accommodations be created, and that the new Bureau conduct regular meetings to keep local organizers of tourist and recreational events up to date and organized.

Toronto, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Toronto Trades Assembly and Toronto Trades and Labour Council

  • Corporate body

The Toronto Trade Assembly was a labour organization established in Toronto, Ontario, in 1871. In February 1871 the Coopers International Union No. 3 appointed a committee of three men: Mr. John Hewitt, Mr. E.S. Gooch, and Mr. James Judge to confer with the various organized Societies of Workingmen of the City of Toronto for the purpose of discussing the question of forming a Central Body to be known as the Toronto Trades Assembly. On March 27, 1871 a meeting of delegates from several unions of the City of Toronto took place. The unions involved in the initial meeting included Lodges no's. 159, 315 and 356 of the Knights of St. Crispen, the Bakers' Union, the Cigar Makers' Union, the Iron Moulders' Union, the Coopers' Union, and the Typographers' Union. On April 12, 1871, it was unanimously carried by all of the union representatives that the Toronto Trades Assembly be formed. It was also decided that non-union shops be allowed to join the Assembly. By 1872, 27 unions had joined the Assembly representing the following trades: wood working, building, carriage making, and metal making, as well as several miscellaneous trades. The Toronto Trades Assembly was active in speaking on behalf of the working people of the community, encouraging union organization, acting as a watchdog on working conditions, and occasionally mediating disputes between employers and employees. No record of the Toronto Trades Assembly exists after 1878. Three years later a successor organization, the Toronto Trades and Labour Council, was formed in July, 1881 to carry on the work begun by the Assembly. This new organization was also instrumental in setting up the Canadian Labour Congress in 1883. The present Toronto and District Labour Council is a direct descendant of the Toronto Trades Assembly.

Tommy Douglas

  • Person

Tommy Douglas was born in Scotland in 1904 and immigrated to Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1919 with his family. Born of working-class and religious parents, he was ordained into the Baptist church in 1930. He later became interested in alleviating the suffering he witnessed during the Great Depression, and in the federal election of 1935 was successfully elected the leader of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). In 1944 Douglas resigned his federal seat to become Premier of Saskatchewan for the next 17 years. In 1961 Douglas resigned as premier and in the following by-election became the leader of the New Democratic Party (NDP) until 1971. Douglas is recognized as the father of socialized medicine, having first advocated Medicare in Canada. He is also credited with having fought for a Canada-wide pension plan and bargaining rights for civil servants. In 1946 Douglas undertook to sponsor a union of the various aboriginal tribes in Saskatchewan, as a way to assist the tribes in having a more effective voice in promoting their own welfare. (Taken from "The Canadian Encyclopedia", Vol.1, Hurtig Publishers, Edmonton, 1985, p.507-508.)

T.M. Fletcher

  • Person

Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Fletcher lived in Thornton, Ontario (Simcoe County). Mrs. Fletcher's [1st] husband was Frank Sanford. Sanford owned and operated a furniture factory in Fenelon Falls until the time it burned down (date unknown). It was never rebuilt. The Fletchers donated land for the Ivy Anglican Church in 1918 and at the 60th anniversary of the church, Mr. Fletcher wrote a history of the Fletchers, which was published in the Barrie Examiner in 1963.

Tinney family

  • Family

William Tinney, Sr. arrived in Cavanville (Cavan) in 1870 and set up a family business in blacksmithing. Cavanville was nicknamed Tinney Town after William and his sons John, Hector, Albert, William and Harry. William Sr. established a blacksmith shop and later a carriage shop, which carried out the business of buggy sales and trade-ins. The shop was located just east of the four corners. There were approximately twelve men employed and William Sr.'s sons worked at the various trades involved in blacksmithing. William Sr.'s daughter, Annie, cooked for everyone. The Tinney homestead was a large red brick house west of Cavan Store. In 1908 Albert and Harry assumed management of the business. Albert later had a General Motors Agency and his son, Donald, continued to operate the business until 1970. (Taken from: This Green and Pleasant Land: Chronicles of Cavan Township. The Millbrook and Cavan Historical Society, 1990.) John Tinney also operated the blacksmith shop at one point. Hector Tinney was involved in the World War I and based at Kinmel Park Camp, near Rhyl in North Wales, and later at Etaples in France.

Tillicum Crews

  • Corporate body

The Tillicum Crews operated in the 1920s. They were part of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) organized camps and only members of the YMCA could participate. The director of the Tillicum Crews was G.A. Anderson of Might Directories, a man knowledgable on the Temagami region. The Tillicum Crews were named Tillicum which came from the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush.

Thomas Watson

  • Person

Thomas Watson was a school teacher in 1858 for the Grammar School at Port Hope, Canada West, which was established in 1853. (Taken from: Hope and its Port. East Durham Historical Society, 1992.)

Thomas W. Poole

  • Person

Thomas Wesley Poole (1831-1905), physician and journalist, was educated at Victoria University and received his M.D. in 1856. He practised medicine in Norwood, Canada West; but in 1864 he moved to Peterborough, and became the editor of the Peterborough "Weekly Review". Later he went back to the practice of medicine and practised in Lindsay, Ontario. He died in Lindsay on August 27, 1905. T.W. Poole was the author of "A sketch of the early settlement and subsequent progress of the town of Peterborough. 1867"

Thomas H.B. Symons

  • Person

Thomas H.B. Symons was born at Toronto, Ontario 30 May 1929, son of Harry Lutz Symons and Dorothy Sarah Bull. He was educated at Upper Canada College, University of Toronto (B.A. 1951), and Oxford University (B.A. 1953, M.A. 1957). He married Christine Ryerson 17 August 1963 and with her had three children: Mary, Ryerson and Jeffery. Professor Symons held many posts as an educator, including Assistant Dean of Men, Trinity College and Instructor of History, University of Toronto 1953-1955; and Dean, Devonshire House, University of Toronto 1955-63. His most notable post, however, was as the founding President and Vice-Chancellor of Trent University, 1961-1972. Symons also held many presidencies, chairmanships and memberships in various organizations, mainly dealing with the topics of education, Canadian studies, Indigenous rights and human rights. From 1971 to 1973, Symons was the President of the Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples. He was the author of several reports and articles and contributed chapters to many books including: "Political Education in Canada" 1988; "Archives Libraries and the Canadian Heritage" 1983; "A Century of Canada's Arctic Islands, 1880-1980" 1981; "A History of Peel County" 1967; and "Native Rights in Canada" 1970. Professor Symons resided in Peterborough, Ontario until his death 1 January 2021. (Taken in part from: Canadian Who's Who, 1993. Toronto: University of Toronto Press Incorporated, 1993.)

Thomas Harold Kenyon Choate

  • Person

Thomas Harold Kenyon Choate was born in Warsaw, Ontario, 28 July 1915. Referred to by the name "Ken" or "Kenyon," Choate was the eldest son of Harold G.E. Choate and Beatrice Coulter (Selkirk) Choate and a direct descendent of Thomas Choate of Warsaw, Ontario. He married Ruth Mary (Powell) Choate, born in Trafalgar Township, Halton County, Ontario, 19 July 1920; she died in Peterborough, Ontario, 10 May 2006. Because his father and his brother also bore the name Harold, Choate signed his name "Thomas K. Choate" or "T.K. Choate" in an effort to avoid confusion. The name "Kenyon" was his maternal grandmother's surname. Choate died in Peterborough, Ontario, 8 October 2008.

Thomas E.W. Nind

  • Person

Thomas Eagleton Westwood Nind was born June 16, 1926, at London, England, son of John Warrick and Amy Mary Nind. He was educated at the Windsor County Schools for Boys from 1934 to 1943. He received his B.A. (1946) and M.A. (1950), from Cambridge University where he studied mathematics. He studied geology, petroleum geology and oil resevoir engineering at the Royal School of Mines in 1950/51. Nind spent a number of years in the oil and petroleum business in England, Holland, Venezuela, and British Borneo. In 1958 he joined the Geology Department at the University of Saskatchewan. In 1966 he took a position as Professor of Mathematics and Dean of Arts and Science at Trent University. In 1971 he became the Vice-President of Academics, and the following year, Nind became T.H.B. Symons' successor as President of Trent University. Nind held this position until 1979. (Taken from: "Who's Who in Canada, 1980-81." Toronto: International Press Limited, 1981.)

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