Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Conference on the State of English Language Publishing in Canada

  • Corporate body

The Conference on the State of English Language Publishing in Canada was sponsored by Trent University's Cultural Studies Program. Held in 1975 at the University on January 24 and 25 it had writers, teachers, publishers and librarians who attended, presented and discussed papers on a variety of subjects. Each delegate at the conference was assigned a student as a guide and host. Secretary of State, Hugh Faulkner gave the opening address and speech to the delegates. Out of the conference was the founding of the Canadian Book and Periodical Development Council. (Taken from: Cole, A.O.C. "Trent the Making of a University, 1957-1987." Trent University, 1992.)

Peter Russell

  • Person

Peter Russell (1733-1808), president and administrator of Upper Canada (1796-1799) was born at Cork, Ireland, in 1733, the son Captain Richard Russell, 14th Foot. He entered the army at an early age, but in 1722 sold his commission and came to America as one of the secretaries of Sir Henry Clinton. At the close of the American Revolution, he returned to England; and in 1791, came out to Canada with Sir John Graves Simcoe, as inspector-general of Upper Canada. In 1792, he was appointed a member of the Executive and Legislative Councils of the province; and from 1796 to 1799 he was the administrator of the government, with the title of president. He died at York, 30 September 1801; and his property was willed to his sister, Elizabeth Russell, who left it to William Warren Baldwin. (Taken from The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography, fourth edition. 1978)

Robert D. Taylor-Vaisey

  • Person

Robert D. Taylor-Vaisey was born in 1948. He attended Trent University, earning his B.A. in 1970 and his M.A. from the Department of History in 1973. While at Trent Taylor-Vaisey was active on various committees including the Champlain College Cabinet, the Trent University Co-ordinating Committee, and the Trent University Congress of Colleges. In 1976, as part of the Toronto Area Archivists Group, he published Ontario's Heritage: A Guide to Archival Resources.

Toronto Trades Assembly and Toronto Trades and Labour Council

  • Corporate body

The Toronto Trade Assembly was a labour organization established in Toronto, Ontario, in 1871. In February 1871 the Coopers International Union No. 3 appointed a committee of three men: Mr. John Hewitt, Mr. E.S. Gooch, and Mr. James Judge to confer with the various organized Societies of Workingmen of the City of Toronto for the purpose of discussing the question of forming a Central Body to be known as the Toronto Trades Assembly. On March 27, 1871 a meeting of delegates from several unions of the City of Toronto took place. The unions involved in the initial meeting included Lodges no's. 159, 315 and 356 of the Knights of St. Crispen, the Bakers' Union, the Cigar Makers' Union, the Iron Moulders' Union, the Coopers' Union, and the Typographers' Union. On April 12, 1871, it was unanimously carried by all of the union representatives that the Toronto Trades Assembly be formed. It was also decided that non-union shops be allowed to join the Assembly. By 1872, 27 unions had joined the Assembly representing the following trades: wood working, building, carriage making, and metal making, as well as several miscellaneous trades. The Toronto Trades Assembly was active in speaking on behalf of the working people of the community, encouraging union organization, acting as a watchdog on working conditions, and occasionally mediating disputes between employers and employees. No record of the Toronto Trades Assembly exists after 1878. Three years later a successor organization, the Toronto Trades and Labour Council, was formed in July, 1881 to carry on the work begun by the Assembly. This new organization was also instrumental in setting up the Canadian Labour Congress in 1883. The present Toronto and District Labour Council is a direct descendant of the Toronto Trades Assembly.

Sidney Smith

  • Person

Sidney Smith was born October 16, 1823 at Port Hope, Upper Canada, to John David Smith and Augusta Louisa Smith. John David Smith sat in the House of Assembly of Upper Canada of Durham from 1828 to 1830. Sidney Smith was the grandson of Elias Smith. Elias was a successful merchant and trader, who left New York to settle in Upper Canada and who founded Port Hope in 1792. Sidney Smith studied law in the office of his brother, John Shuter Smith, and was admitted to the bar in 1844. Smith married Mary Ann Bennett of Cobourg, Upper Canada, on January 21, 1845. He continued to practice law throughout his life, first in Cobourg and later acted as solicitor for the Commercial Bank of the Midland District, the Bank of Montreal, the Midland Railway of Canada, the town of Cobourg, and then in Peterborough. In 1853 he was elected a municipal councilor for both Cobourg and the township of Hamilton, and was the warden for Northumberland and Durham. In 1854, Smith was elected as a Reformer to the Legislative Assembly for Northumberland West and was re-elected in 1857. From February 2, 1858 until the government's defeat on the Militia Bill in May 1862, Smith was the postmaster general in the cabinet of John A. Macdonald and George-Etienne Cartier and was also a member of the Board of Railway Commissioners. Also in 1858, Smith introduced the Upper Canada Jurors' Act and carried it through the assembly. Smith's most notable accomplishment while in office occurred in 1859 when he concluded arrangements with the United States, Britain, France, Belgium, and Prussia for mail services to Canada and the United States. By 1860, he gained abolition of Sunday labour in the Post Offices of Canada West. Smith was defeated in the general election of 1861 by James Cockburn but he was elected to the Legislative Council for Trent in the same year and was able to retain his portfolio of postmaster general. In 1863, he resigned his seat in the Upper House, sought election to the assembly of the constituency of Victoria, was defeated and resigned from politics permanently. He returned to full-time law practice in Peterborough and also served in the militia as captain of the Peterborough Infantry Company No. 2. In 1866 he was appointed inspector of registry offices for Canada West, and continued in that position for the province of Ontario after Confederation. Sidney Smith died September 27, 1889 in Cobourg, Ontario.

Tourism Development Through Recreational Events

  • Corporate body

The Tourism Development Through Recreation Events was a project which commenced from July 1981 and ended April 1982. The project aimed at determining the tourist potential of recreational events in both the City and County of Peterborough.The idea for the project was developed during the 1980 Ontario Summer Games. The impact of the Games, within the region, and across the province, was quite considerable in terms of drawing attention to the importance of recreational activities for the local tourism industry. The general objectives of the program were: 1) To provide an opportunity to consider the impact that recreational events of a regional nature have on the local tourist industry; 2) To become more deliberate in the planning of recreational events that are of tourist appeal; 3) To determine the number, type and scale of recreation-tourist events; 4) To provide resource material for organizations interested in giving this tourism component more serious consideration; and 5) To increase the tourist potential of many existing events through this project. As a result of the project, a twelve month planning calendar was created which outlined upcoming events. Also a series of recommendations were brought forth concerning the creation of a new Peterborough Kawartha Tourism Convention, the yearly production of the planning calendar, that a clearing house of local tourist accommodations be created, and that the new Bureau conduct regular meetings to keep local organizers of tourist and recreational events up to date and organized.

Save Maple Mountain Committee

  • Corporate body

The Save Maple Mountain Committee was created for the purpose of stopping the development of a proposed ski resort in the Maple Mountain - Lady Evelyn wilderness area north of North Bay, Ontario in 1973.

Seth Soper Smith

  • Person

Seth Soper Smith was a lawyer who practiced in Port Hope, Ontario in the early 1900's.

Association of Canadian Universities For Northern Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS) was founded in 1977 at Churchill, Manitoba and legally incorporated in March, 1987. The main founder of the Association was Professor Trevor Lloyd. Members include Universities across Canada, of which Trent University is one, that have an interest in Northern Studies. The Association does four types of work. It offers mutual assistance among member-universities in research, shared use of facilities, interchange of staff and students, the provision and use of libraries, preparation of bibliographies etc.; provision of assistance to northern residents through research, teacher training and higher education; makes available the knowledge, skills and services of universities to the Governments of Canada, the Provinces and Territories and to industry and the community at large; and, contributes towards Canada's international commitments for scientific information and research on the polar regions and increasing the exchange of scholars, students and information between polar countries. (Taken from: ACUNS - AUCEN Constitution and By-laws, 1979, page i.) The association has held annual conferences since 1979 at Chicoutimi, Quebec (1979), Trent University (1980), Calgary, Alberta (1981), Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario (1982) and at Regina in Saskatchewan (1983).

Trent Valley Navigation Company (Limited)

  • Corporate body

The Trent Valley Navigation Company, Bobcaygeon, Ontario, was incorporated in 1883. Mossom Martin (Mossie) Boyd was the president of the company and he and his brother William owned nearly all of the stock. The company consisted of a fleet of a half dozen steamboats which operated along the waterways surrounding Bobcaygeon, carrying passengers and freight from Lindsay to Coboconk, Sturgeon Point, Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon. At Lindsay there was a connection with the Grand Trunk Railway. In the most productive years (after the turn of the century) revenue was almost evenly divided between passenger and freight transportation. The Company closed in 1915, precipitated by the death of Mossom Boyd the previous year.

Association for Canadian Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) was founded in 1973 at Queen's University as a Pan-Canadian, non-profit organization which sought to promote a knowledge of Canada at the post-secondary level through teaching, research, and publications. A founding member of the International Council for Canadian Studies, the ACS is also a member of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and the Social Science Federation of Canada. The objectives of the Association was to promote multidisciplinary and comparative perspectives, and to encourage exchanges and co-operation between the numerous programs, centres, study groups, institutes and other organizations working in the field of Canadian, Quebec, and regional studies.

Frederick Arthur Verner and C.J. Townsend

  • Person

C.J. Townsend was an artist's agent who lived in London, England. Frederick Arthur Verner was born 26 February 1836 in Hammondsville, Upper Canada and died 16 May 1928 in London, England. He was a painter who specialized in the Canadian West, often depicting Indigenous peoples and bison. He sought to convey an accuracy of his subjects as he portrayed the west as a veritable eden. He was an artist present at the signing of the North West Angle Treaty Lake of the Woods. (Taken from: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

William Twist

  • Person

William Twist ([193-?]-2006) was a resident of Lakefield, Ontario with a long-standing interest in its architecture and history. He was a member of L.A.C.A.C. from 1989 to 1995 and Chair of Lakefield's Christ Church Restoration Committee.

Peterborough City photographs

  • Corporate body

It was in May of 1819 that the first settlers came to the region in Newcastle District which is now known as Peterborough. One of these settlers was Adam Scott (1796-1838), and he erected a saw and grist mill on the west bank of the Otonabee River (at the location where King St. now crosses the river). This location, then known as Scott's Plains, was to become the City of Peterborough. The area had been previously surveyed by Samuel Wilmot in 1818, and at that time, he recommended to the surveyor general that land be set aside for the development of a town at the junction of Smith, Douro, North Monaghan and Otonabee Townships, along the shores of the Otonabee River. In 1825, the recommended townsite was surveyed again by Richard Birdsall and the creation of a town plan was undertaken. From 1819 to 1825, the only inhabitants of Scott's Plains were Adam Scott's family and a few hired men. This changed with the arrival of the Peter Robinson immigrants in 1825 who numbered close to 2,000 people. Many of them settled in the townships surrounding Scott's Plains, which was renamed in 1826, to Peterboro by Sir Peregrine Maitland, in honour of Peter Robinson. By 1827, there were 20 buildings located within the townsite, and in the summer of 1828, another 20 houses were built. Shops, taverns, schools and churches were built within the town boundaries. Timber, and then lumber, dominated the Peterborough industrial scene from 1825 to 1875, but it was not the only form of industry. Peterborough also had a tannery, three iron foundries, and several woolen and grain mills. The location of Peterborough along the shores of the Otonabee was extremely important in the development of Peterborough as a manufacturing centre. The river provided not only water power, but a means of transportation for both people and goods. In 1890, Edison Electric, later known as Canadian General Electric, set up a plant in Peterborough, and by 1892, it became the site of the CGE head office for Canadian Operations. In 1900, Quaker Oats also came to Peterborough. Not only did Quaker employ a substantial number of people, they also used locally grown grains in the production of their cereals. The period between 1875 and 1930 was one of rapid industrial growth in Peterborough. As well, the population was constantly increasing. In 1838, the population was between eight and nine hundred and by the 1852 census, it had risen to 2,191. In 1871 it had increased to 4,611 and it became necessary for Peterborough to annex land from the surrounding townships. In 1872, 239 acres were annexed from Smith, 50 acres from Douro, and 581 acres from North Monaghan. After the annexation, the population was close to 7,000 inhabitants. Peterborough officially became a city in 1904 and by 1921 the population had increased to 21,000.

Peterborough directory

  • Corporate body

It was in May of 1819 that the first settlers came to the region in Newcastle District which is now known as Peterborough. One of these settlers was Adam Scott (1796-1838), and he built a saw and grist mill on the west bank of the Otonabee River (at the location were King St. now crosses the river). This location, then known as Scott's Plains, was to become the City of Peterborough. The area had been previously surveyed by Samuel Wilmot in 1818, and at that time, he recommended to the surveyor general that land be set aside for the development of a town at the junction of Smith, Douro, North Monaghan and Otonabee Townships, along the shores of the Otonabee River. In 1825, the recommended townsite was surveyed again by Richard Birdsall and the creation of a town plan was undertaken. From 1819 to 1825, the only inhabitants of Scott's Plains were Adam Scott's family and a few hired men. This changed with the arrival of the Peter Robinson immigrants in 1825 who numbered close to 2,000 people. Many of them settled in the townships surrounding Scott's Plains, which was renamed in 1826, to Peterboro by Sir Peregrine Maitland, in honour of Peter Robinson. By 1827, there were 20 buildings located within the townsite, and in the summer of 1828, another 20 houses were built. Shops, taverns, schools and churches began to sprout within the town boundaries. Timber, and then lumber, dominated the Peterborough industrial base from 1825 to 1875. But this was not the only form of industry. Peterborough also had a tannery, three iron foundries, and several woolen and grain mills. The location of Peterborough along the shores of the Otonabee was extremely important in the development of Peterborough as a manufacturing centre. The river provided not only water power, but a means of transportation for both people and goods. In 1890, Edison Electric, later known as Canadian General Electric, set up a plant in Peterborough, and by 1892, it became the site of the CGE head office for Canadian Operations. In 1900, Quaker Oats also came to Peterborough. Not only did Quaker employ a substantial number of people, they also used locally grown grains in the production of their cereals. The period between 1875 and 1930 was one of rapid industrial growth in Peterborough. As well, the population was constantly increasing. In 1838, the population was between 800 and 900, and by the 1852 census, it had risen to 2,191. In 1871 it had increased to 4,611 and it became necessary for Peterborough to annex land from the surrounding townships. In 1872, 239 acres were annexed from Smith, 50 acres from Douro, and 581 acres from North Monaghan. After the annexation, the population was close to 7,000 inhabitants. Peterborough officially became a city in 1904 and continued to grow and by 1921, the population had increased to 21,000.

Peterborough Community Concert Association

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Community Concert Association was formally established in 1942 when the Peterborough Music Club joined Community Concerts of America, Inc. It was formed under the leadership of Dr. J.J. Craig, a well known Peterborough dentist, and a group of business people interested in bringing outstanding musical talent to Peterborough. The objectives of the Association were to "build and maintain through nonprofit plan a permanent concert audience on a strictly membership basis; to cultivate in the citizens of Peterborough and its surrounding area interest in good music; to provide for its members an opportunity to hear good music in the form of concerts and recitals, of which there will be a minimum of three presented annually; and to foster and encourage public appreciation of music and the teaching of music, history of music, and music appreciation in the schools of Peterborough and its surrounding area." Peterborough did have a concert association which existed before 1942, but unfortunately, all written records of this association have been lost. Over the years, the Peterborough Community Concert Association was able to bring many big name artists and groups to Peterborough including Ephriam Zimbalist, the Munich Chamber Orchestra, and Liona Boyd. In 1987, the Peterborough Community Concert Association broke its ties with Community Concerts of America, Inc. due to high commissions and the high American dollar and comparatively low Canadian dollar. The Peterborough Concert Association was the result of this split and it has continued to function effectively, holding five to six concerts a year and maintaining the high artistic standards set in previous years.

Peterborough Fire Department

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Fire brigade was established in 1850 and until 1908, the brigade ran on a totally voluntary basis. The volunteers were paid a fifteen dollar yearly honorarium for their efforts. The first Captain of the brigade was Robert Swayne. The first Chief Engineer was W.S. Conger and the Assistant Engineer was John R. Benson. From 1886 to 1908, the fire department was housed in the town buildings on the southeast corner of the market square and it shared quarters with the police department. On New Year's Day 1908, a new fire station was opened on Aylmer Street. In the same year, it was decided by the City of Peterborough that a permanent fire brigade was necessary. The change from voluntary to permanent brigade took place on June 30, 1908, and was marked by a grand procession of the old fire brigade. The personnel of the permanent brigade consisted of a Chief, Assistant Chief, two drivers, three paid firemen and six call men.

Peterborough Newspaper Files

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Despatch (1845-1856) was published by George Haslehurst and had its offices at Hunter and Chambers Streets. The Peterborough Review was established in 1853 by Robert Romaine and his brothers-in-law, Thomas and Richard White. They owned the Review from 1856 to 1864. They bought the Despatch's files and equipment in 1856. The Review was sold to E.J. Toker and John Carnegie in 1878. The Review stopped publishing in 1921. The Peterborough Examiner was established 1856 by Augustus Sawers as Peterborough's reform paper, taking over from the Despatch. Robert Graham and James Renfrew bought the paper in 1859 and in 1864 James Stratton bought it. From 1877 to 1914 James Stratton's son ran the paper. The Peterborough Examiner is still running in 1996.

Peterborough Light and Power Company

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Light and Power Company was a private electrical utility company that operated between 1884 and 1913 in the city of Peterborough. By 1913, it had a total of 2320 hydro poles in operation, and provided electricity for residences, streetlights, industries, and the street railway. It was expropriated by the city of Peterborough in 1913.

Victoria Road, Ontario

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Results 851 to 875 of 904