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People, Organizations, and Families

Camp X Historical Society

  • Corporate body

Camp X Historical Society is located in Whitby, Ontario, near the former site of Camp X. Camp X, which operated from 1941 to 1946, was a training camp responsible for training recruits for the Special Operations Executive of the British Security Coordination during World War II. It was comprised of two sections, the Special Training School No. 103, which trained allied agents in the techniques of secret warfare, and Hydra, a network which communicated messages between Canada, United States, and Great Britain. Camp X Historical Society was established to track down surviving SOE agents, and to document and catalogue their experiences. The Society is in the process of establishing a small museum on the original site of the Camp to house artifacts and memorabilia which document the operation.

Heather Dunlop

  • Person

Heather Dunlop graduated with a M.A. degree in Canadian Heritage and Development Studies from Trent University in May 1998.

Adele and Dr. J. Harry Ebbs

  • Family

Dr. J. Harry Ebbs was born in 1906, Worksop, England and moved to Peterborough, Ontario with his family in 1912. He became interested in camping through the Y.M.C.A., and, later, at the age of 17, became more involved in camping as a counsellor, in 1924, at Camp Ahmek in Algonquin Park. Throughout his university career, he continued to work as a camp counsellor at Camp Ahmek, and later at Camp Wapameo, both Taylor Statten Camps. He graduated from the faculty of medicine, University of Toronto in 1931 and his medical career led him to remote settlements in northern Canada and to hospitals in India and Malaysia. He was later the senior staff physician at the Hospital for Sick Children, a professor of pediatrics and a director of the school of physical and health education at the University of Toronto. From 1938 to 1975 he was the medical director of the Taylor Statten Camps. It was while working as a counsellor at the Taylor Statten Camps that he met his future wife Adele Statten, daughter of Taylor Statten. They were married in 1935 and together had three children: Barbara Adele, Alice Susan, and John William. Throughout their lives, the Ebbs have been involved in organized camping in Canada and the United States, as well as in India. Both were honorary life members of the Canadian Camping Association and Dr. Ebbs was a governor of Trent University, where the Ebbs Camping Archives were established in 1979 to honor the Ebbs' contributions to the children's camping movement in Canada. Dr. John Henry Ebbs died June 1, 1990 after suffering a stroke the previous year.

Joseph H. Daley

  • Person

Joseph H. Daley was a Government Immigration agent who lived in Montreal, Canada East. He had affiliations with Sir John A. Macdonald and Thomas D'Arcy McGee.

Davidson family

  • Family

James Davidson was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1801, the son of Hugh Davidson. In 1823, James Davidson came to Canada with his sister. They settled first with an Uncle in Smith Township. In 1831, James settled on lot 20, concession 5, Smith Township, and established his own 200 acre farm. He married Elizabeth McConnell of Cavan Township the same year. They had four sons and four daughters: Ann, Hugh, William, Mary Jane, Sarah, James Jr., Robert, and Fanny. In 1837, Davidson fought in the Rebellion. Robert eventually went into the hardware business in Peterborough, Hugh and James Jr. went into farming, and William became a grocer and flour merchant. Elizabeth Davidson died in 1864 and James Davidson died sometime after after 1884. (Taken from: "History of the County of Peterborough." Toronto: C. Blackett Robinson, 1884.)

Walter Nichol Davidson Family

  • Family

The family of Walter Nichol Davidson resided in Brighton, Ontario. Walter Davidson (?-1936) was a merchant-tailor. He married Isabella Massie D. McDonald (?-1946). They had two daughters: Annie Helen (1878-?) and Jessie Isabella. Annie wasa school teacher and she studied through correspondence courses from the University of Toronto Extension Branch. She married dentist by the last name of Harnden. This Davidson family maybe related to the Davidson family [(77-003)]: https://www.trentu.ca/library/archives/77-003 of Cobourg, Ontario. One letter in the 86-015 fonds is addressed to a W.N. Davidson and speaks of a "Lizzie", perhaps Elizabeth, and a "Jim", perhaps James. Both collections are similar in that they contain large number of deeds and mortgages.

Ethelwyn Campbell

  • Person

Ethelwyn Campbell (1926-) was a typing teacher in the Fort Frances, Ontario area in 1972. By 1976 she was living in Islington, Ontario and taught business at the Central Commerce School in Toronto. In 2002 she was living in Perth, Ontario. She is a world traveler.

Campbell family

  • Family

This fonds represents many different members of the Campbell family of Keene and their interests. The scrapbook was composed by Isabelle Fulton Miller Campbell, daughter of Isabella Brownlie Miller and James Miller, and deals with different areas of interest to her. The two diaries, written by Isabelle Fulton Miller Campbell, deal with every day life and reflect how a number of people lived during the time period covered by the diaries. There is a business ledger of William Campbell who was a tailor in Keene and he also appears to be responsible as an executor for people's estates including his mother's. There is also a day book from a Keene grocery store which lists what the Campbells and other people in the Village of Keene purchased. In "The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough, Ontario, 1825-1875" there a number of Campbells listed as living in Keene in 1836 and 1844. Please see "Keene United Church" by D. Gayle Nelson for more information on some of the Campbell's listed in the Atlas.

George Campbell

  • Person

George Campbell was a farmer who lived in Norland, Ontario, during the 1870's.

Ian Campbell

  • Person

Ian Lachlan Campbell (1927-) was born in Ottawa, Ontario and married Marion Isabel Wellwood (1926-) in 1950. He attended graduate school at the University of London and studied political and social philosophy. Campbell taught at Mount Allison University (1954-1965), where his research interests concerned criminal behaviour. He served as alderman and Mayor of Sackville, New Brunswick, and as Dean at Bishop's University, Sir George Williams University, and Concordia University, and was commissioner of the Government of Canada's Commission of Inquiry into the Non-Medical Use of Drugs (the LeDain Commission). Campbell was also Principal of Renison College at the University of Waterloo, and president of the Canadian Heraldry Society. He is also a Fellow of several societies and serves on many university associations.

Blodwen Davies

  • Person

Blodwen Davies was born in 1897 in Longueuil, Quebec. She was educated in Montreal and she started her writing career as a reporter for the Fort William newspaper. When she heard of the Group of Seven she moved to Toronto to meet with them in 1921. She first wrote about Tom Thomson in a book called "Paddle and Pallette" published in 1930 and then wrote a second book entitled: "A Study of Tom Thomson: The Story of a Man Who Looked for Beauty and for Truth in the Wilderness" in 1935. She was a prolific writer and produced a number of works including: "Storied Streets of Quebec" in 1927; "Ruffles and Rapiers", "Daniel Du Lhut" and "Old Father Forest" all in 1930; "Storied York" in 1931; "Saguenay and Gaspe", "Romantic Quebec" and "The Charm of Ottawa" all in 1932; "Youth, Marriage and the Family", "Youth Speaks out on Citizenship" and "Youth Speaks its Mind" also all in 1948; "Gaspe: Land of History and Romance" in 1949; "Quebec: Portrait of a Province" in 1951-1952 and "Ottawa: Portrait of a Capital" in 1954. She wrote mostly histories but she also wrote a few romances. For a short time Blodwen Davies lived in the United States. In 1946 she returned to Canada and moved to Markham, Ontario. She lived in Cedar Grove, Ontario for the last fifteen years of her life. At this point in her life she was concentrating on folk history and lore of the Mennonites in Canada. This book was published shortly before her death. Blodwen Davies died September 10, 1966. (Taken from: "The Canadian Encyclopedia." Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Ontario Fire Insurance Plans, Campbellford

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Dunsford family

  • Family

The Dunsford family is connected through marriage to families associated with the early settlement of Peterborough and area, namely the Boyd, Langton, and Rubidge families.

Robert George Barclay

  • Person

Robert George Barclay was the Chief Insurance Officer of the Unemployment Insurance Commission from its inception in 1941 until his retirement in 1956.

Canada West and Canada. United Counties of Durham and Northumberland Census

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided into sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.) In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada in 19 counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada into 19 Counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.) The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterbourgh County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2,169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it was not until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.) Hastings County was proclaimed the 11th county of Upper Canada in 1792. The second largest county in Ontario, it includes nineteen municipal townships: Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Carlow, Dungannon, Elzevir and Grimsthorpe, Faraday, Hershal, Hungerford, Huntingdon, Limerick, Madoc, Marmora and Lake, Mayo; Monteagle, Rawdon, Sidney, Thurlow, Tudor and Cashel, Tyendinaga, and Wollaston. Hastings was named after a military leader who had fought in the American Revolution, Francis Rawdon-Hastings (1754-1826). His family name was taken from the town of Hastings in Sussex, England. Until 1849 Hastings County was called the Victoria District. This was changed at that time by the Baldwin Act which replaced district councils with county councils. The first major industry in Hastings County was agriculture, and this was well-established by 1860, with Belleville having the largest saw mills west of Ottawa. Around this time, mining became an important attraction for new settlers, with the extraction of gold at Eldorado, Deloro, Gilmour, and Cordova. Once the Grand Trunk Railway began making stops in Belleville in 1856, the economy of the county improved immensely. Today tourism, lumbering and mining are the major industries of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places on Ontario, Part II." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1981.)

Bark family

  • Family

The Bark family resided in Toronto, Ontario during the early 1900's and spent their vacation time at their cottage, "Lingerlonger Lodge" which was located on the shores of Moore Lake, just south of Minden, Ontario.

Edna Barker

  • Person

Edna Barker was born in 1952 and was editor at CBC for Peter Gzowski for 20 years. She has edited two books relating to Gzowski, A Peter Gzowski Reader, and Remembering Peter Gzowski: A Book of Tributes.

Leslie Barker

  • Person

Leslie Barker is a descendent of the several Barker relatives who figure largely in the fonds, Dr. E.J. Barker, R.W. Barker, Lt. Col. R.K. Barker, and Capt. W.D.P. Barker.

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was inconsistent and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

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