Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Duncan Graham

  • Person

Duncan Graham was born October 5, 1845 in the Township of Mara, Ontario County, Canada West, to Archibald Graham and Ann McQuaig. He was the grandson of one of the early settlers, John or James Graham, natives of Scotland. He was a farmer and unmarried. He was also a Councillor, Deputy-Reeve and Reeve of Mara Township and Warden of the County of Ontario in 1896. He was elected to the House of Commons at the by-election of February 4, 1897. He was a Liberal-Independent. (Taken from: "The Parliamentary Guide, 1898-9." Winnipeg: Manitoba Free Press, 1898.)

Andrew Finnie II

  • Person

Andrew Finnie II was born in 1820 and emigrated from Scotland to Canada with his brothers in 1840. Around 1850, Finnie settled on Lot 12 Concession 2 in South Monaghan Township. He and his wife, Jane Chambers, had thirteen children of which eleven lived to adulthood. Some moved to Manitoba and sent photographs over the years to the family who remained on the South Monaghan homestead; the homestead to this day is still in possession of Finnie heirs. Andrew Finnie II died in 1908.

John R. Fisher

  • Person

John R. Fisher was the Special Projects Planner, Planning and Research, for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. He is a graduate of Trent University.

Frobisher Bay

  • Person

Frobisher Bay (now called Iqaluit) is named after explorer Martin Frobisher who sailed into Frobisher Bay in search of the northwest passage. Iqaluit is Inuktitut for "place of many fish."

Stevens, Henry Herbert

  • Person

Henry Herbert Stevens (Harry) was born December 8, 1878 in Bristol, England. In 1887 he and his father, two older brothers and a sister emigrated to Peterborough, Canada. In 1894 the family moved to Vancouver in British Columbia. A short time after this Harry met and married Gertrude Glover. Together they had 5 children: 2 boys; Francis and Douglas, and 3 girls; Majorie, Sylvia and Patricia. H.H. Stevens served with the American Army in the Boxer Rebellion. When he returned to Vancouver he went into the grocery, real estate and insurance businesses. He was elected, in 1911, to the House of Commons, for Vancouver, and remained there until 1930. He represented East Kooteney from 1930 to 1940. He held the positions of Minister of Trade (Meighan administration) in 1921 and Minister of Trade and Commerce (Bennet administration) from 1930 to 1934. He was Chairman of the Price-Spreads Commission in 1934. Due to a disagreement, with Cabinet about the findings of the commission, H.H. Stevens resigned his position and established the Reconstruction Party. In 1938 he joined the Conservative Party. H.H. Stevens was President of the Vancouver Board of Trade from 1952 to 1953. He died June 14, 1973 in Vancouver, British Columbia. (Taken from: The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography. 4th ed. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1978.)

John Elly Harding

  • Person

His Honour John Elly Harding, County Court Judge, was born in Beverly Township of Wentworth County in Upper Canada on May 29, 1840, son of John Harding and Jane Talbot. In 1866, Harding married Mary Stevenson of Sarnia, Ontario; Mary died in 1905 and Harding married Elizabeth Malcolmson seven years later. Harding was initiated into Masonry in St. John's Lodge No. 73 and in 1868 was elected Worshipful Master. From 1872 to 1874 he served as the District Deputy Grand Master of South Huron District. Harding was educated at the Caradoc Academy and later was privately tutored by Reverend H.B. Jessop. He read law with Richard Bayley, K.C., of London, Ontario and with Eccles and Carroll of Toronto, Ontario. Harding practiced law in St. Mary's and Strafford, Ontario until 1898, when he was appointed Junior Judge of the County Court in Victoria County, Ontario. In 1906, he was appointed Senior Court Judge of Victoria County. Judge Harding died on March 16, 1925 at the age of 84 and is interred in Lindsay, Ontario. (Taken from Who's Who and Why, Vol. 5. Vancouver: International Press Ltd, 1914.; biography further augmented from information received from Ernest Huggins, 2012).

F.W. Haultain

  • Person

F.W. Haultain, the son of Major General Francis Haultain, was born at Brussels, Belgium, November 7, 1821, and was educated at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, England. He was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, March 19, 1839, and after serving many years in Canada, retired as Lieutenant-Colonel in May 1860. He then settled at Peterborough, Upper Canada, in September 1860, and almost immediately became involved in political life. He won the general election of 1861, defeating W.S. Conger by some thirty votes. In 1863, he stood aside while Conger was acclaimed to the seat, but, upon Conger's death in 1864, re-entered the fray to defeat Charles Perry by one hundred and six votes in a rather warm campaign. Haultain died in 1882.

J. Gainey

  • Person

J. Gainey was an international organizer for the Barbers' Union at the turn of the century and held the position for many years. He was born in approximately 1875 and lived until 1937. He resided in Peterborough, Ontario.

Gerald Cantello

  • Person

Gerald Cantello is a graduate of the M.A. program at Trent University and a former employee (1951-1989) of C.G.E., Peterborough, Ontario. He was recruited from Britain as a machine and tool design draftsman and in 1958 had advanced to the Civilian Atomic Power Department of C.G.E.

David Carley

  • Person

David Carley was born in Peterborough, Ontario in 1955 and educated at Trent University and Queen's University Law School. He was editor of the Kawartha Sun newspaper from 1981-1982 and is currently an editor at Scirocco Press. He is a playwright whose work has been staged internationally. His plays include: Susanna, Sister Jude, Writing With Our Feet, Into, After You, A View From the Roof, Losing Paradise (edited), Taking Liberties, South on Bay, Vanishing Point and many others. He was formerly drama editor for the CBC show "Morningside," editor of Stereodrama, and is now senior script editor for CBC Radio Performance. See also Dave Carley's website.

C.W. Hedley

  • Person

Reverend C.W. Hedley was a minister who was serving in Peterborough, Ontario in 1895 and 1896. Some of his time as minister was served at the Otonabee mission.

John Carleton Grover

  • Person

John Carleton Grover of "Balsam Farm," Norwood, Ontario married Rachel Elmhurst in 1942. He was a civil servant employed as pay and allowance ledger keeper with the Royal Canadian Air Force Recruiting Centre in Ottawa. In World War II, Grover became a member of 432 Squadron and served as a pilot officer overseas. For his service, he received the following R.C.A.F. decorations: 1939-1943 Star; R.C.A.F. Operational Wings; and the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp. Grover was the great grandson of the Rev. Michael Andrews Farrar of Hastings, Ontario.

Gavin Henderson

  • Person

Gavin Henderson was born in 1911 and raised in England. In his early twenties he visited Canada with a friend. In 1934 Henderson emigrated to Canada and worked in the Eaton's art gallery in Toronto. He attended monthly meetings of the Toronto Anglers and Hunters Association. Eventually Gavin came to know Frank Kortright and when a conservation council was established Kortright offered Gavin the position of secretary in 1952. Working in the council enriched Gavin's circle of acquaintances in the conservation and preservation fields. As editor of the Council's Bulletin he read everything he could that pertained to conservation and preservation. Throughout all of this he pushed the concern of conservation to the masses. He wrote articles in the Ontario Naturalist, gave lectures and briefs to government agencies, speeches and seminars to espouse his cause. He left the Conservation Council in 1965. Henderson was appointed a member on a standing committee advisory to the Minister of Lands and Forests 1959-1970. He was also director of the National and Provincial Parks Association of Canada. (Taken from: Wareki, George Michael. "Protecting Ontario's Wilderness: A History of Wilderness Conservation in Ontario, 1927-1973." Doctoral Thesis, McMaster University, 1989.) He founded the National and Provincial Parks Association of Canada and was the first executive director from 1964 to 1974. He has sat on a number of committees and associations involved in the conservation and preservation of Canada's natural resources. In 1985, he received Parks Canada's National Heritage Award. In 1989 he received the J.B. Harkin Medal from the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. His leadership helped save Quetico Park from large scale commercial lumbering and prevented massive resort development at Lake Louise. He helped to establish ten new national parks, two of which, the Nahanni and Kluane, were declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites. For this service to Canada Gavin Henderson was recognized and on October 27, 1993 he was invested into the Order of Canada.

Dorothy Choate Herriman

  • Person

Dorothy Choate Herriman was born in September of 1901 at Lindsay, Ontario, the daughter of William Choate Herriman (Medical Director of the Ontario Hospital, Orillia) and Nellie J. Williams (daughter of Lewis Williams of Johnstown, Pennsylvania). Her family is related to the Choates who were early pioneer settlers in the area. She spent her childhood in Kingston, Toronto and Orillia. She was educated at the Model School in Toronto, Orillia Central School, Orillia Collegiate Institute, Havergal College in Toronto and the Ontario College of Art. She served, for a time, as secretary to the Canadian Author's Association. She was a poet and published a volume of poetry entitled Mater Silva in 1929 by McClelland and Stewart. She had numerous other poems published in newspapers and literary journals in Canada and England. Dorothy died in 1978.

Katharine Hooke

  • Person

Katharine Hooke (nee Grier) was born in 1932. She married Harry G. Hooke (1930-2013) in 1954 and they had two children. The family moved to Peterborough, Ontario in 1961 and spent summer vacations at nearby Stoney Lake. Harry (Hal) Hooke became director of part-time students at Trent University. Katharine Hooke served on the board of trustees of the Canadian Canoe Museum and has received Civic Awards for her volunteer work in Peterborough. She is a researcher and writer of local history and is the author of a number of publications: St. Peter’s on-the-Rock, Stony Lake, Ontario: seventy-five years of service (1989); From campsite to cottage: early Stoney Lake (1992); From Burleigh to Boschink: a community called Stony Lake (co-written with Christie Bentham, 2000); The Peterborough Club chronicle (compiled by Niklas Rishor, Danielle Allen, edited by Katharine Hooke, 2009). Hooke is the niece of the late explorer, George Mellis Douglas (1875-1963) of Northcote Farm, Lakefield, Ontario.

Samuel Hughes

  • Person

Sir Samuel Hughes was born January 8, 1853 at Solina near Bowmanville, Canada West. He was educated at the Toronto Model and Normal School and also attend the University of Toronto. He received honour certificates in English, French, German and History. While he was still in his teens he took part in the second Fenian Raid and from this battle he received a medal. He had 3 brothers and 7 sisters. His father and one brother were school teachers and with their encouragement he became a teacher in Belleville, Lifford and Bowmanville. He also taught at the Old King's Grammar School in Toronto as English and History Master from 1875 to 1885. He was the author of a school geography and a County and Railway Map of Ontario. In 1872 he married his first wife, Caroline J. Preston, at Lifford, Ontario. She died a year later. In 1875 Sam married again. He married Mary E. Burk, daughter of Harvey W. Burk who was liberal M.P. of West Durham, Ontario. Samuel started the Millbrook lacrosse team. Throughout this time he participated in the militia and politics in which he had a long career. At age 32 he moved his family to Lindsay where he had bought the newspaper The Victoria Warder. He was publisher from 1885 to 1897. He was a Member of Parliament for Victoria North in 1892 and in 1899 went to the Boer War in South Africa from which he was dismissed for military indiscipline. In 1911 he won the militia portfolio of the Borden government. He foresaw the World War I and he helped Canada prepare for it by building armouries across Canada. He stepped up the training program for the Canadian Militia and he was able to place in the field four divisions, complete with artillery, and all details. In August 1915 he was knighted by King George V. After the Ross Rifle fiasco he was forced to leave the Borden government in 1919. He stayed in politics for the Victoria/Haliburton Region until his death on October 24, 1921 in Lindsay, Ontario. (Taken from: Capon, Alan R. His Faults Lie Gently. The Incredible Sam Hughes. Lindsay, Ontario: Floyd W. Hall, 1969.)

Robert Lloyd Hunter

  • Person

Robert Lloyd Hunter was born August 19, 1914 to Cecil Hunter and Josephine Sipprel. He went to Ridley College in St. Catharines, Ontario. He received a Bachelor of Commerce and Law Certificate from the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall. From 1939 to 1942 he served as Lieutenant of the 7th Toronto Reserve Regiment and from 1942 to 1945 he served as Captain with the 26th Field Regiment. In 1944 he married Hope Hazen Mackay and they had three daughters. In 1947 he was called to the Bar in Ontario and from 1947 to 1950 he served as a solicitor with the firm of Fraser & Beatty in Toronto. Subsequently, he was Vice-President and Director of Pitfield, Mackay, Ross investment dealers. He was an avid collector of Canadiana (Taken from: Who's Who in Canada. Volume 73). Robert Hunter died in 1986.

John Huston

  • Person

John Huston was born in Ireland in 1790. He married Martha Middleton (1787-1867), also of Ireland, and they came to Upper Canada by way of New York. Together they had four children: Mary Anne, Jane, Eliza, and Joseph. On 28 October 1820, Huston was authorized by the government to assist in surveying the Peterborough area. He also worked closely with Peter Robinson in settling the Irish immigrants into Emily Township in 1825. As well as being a highly respected surveyor, Huston was a Captain in the Durham Volunteer Militia, and a Justice of the Peace. He died in Cavan on 18 May 1845 at the age of 55.

William H. Ives

  • Person

William H. Ives was a builder and a contractor in Colborne, Ontario, at the end of the nineteenth century.

Elgie E.M. Joblin

  • Person

Elgie Ellingham Miller Joblin was born April 6, 1909 in Toronto to Flora Gertrude Elgie, of Toronto, and Frederick George Joblin, of the Isle of Wight in England. Elgie married Helen Majorie Smith of Rawdon Township on October 21, 1936. He studied at Victoria College, Emmanuel College and the University of Toronto. His M.A. thesis was entitled, "The Education of the Indians of Western Ontario". He was ordained as a United Church minister in 1936. He served the Aboriginal Peoples of Ontario as a student and minister in South Caradoc from 1936 to 1944. He taught and supervised the residential school at Muncey, Ontario from 1946 to 1957. He was the Assistant and later the Associate Secretary for Home Missions from 1957 to 1971. He served at Coboconk, Ontario, until his retirement from the ministry. He died in 1993.

Richard Johnston

  • Person

Richard Johnston was born August 8, 1946 in Pembroke, Ontario. He was raised near Peterborough, Ontario and educated at Trent University, where he worked as an administrator and counsellor after earning his Bachelor of Arts in History and English. He later became a community worker and administrator, specializing in the problems of the elderly. He also worked as an organizer for former NDP leader Stephen Lewis, and ran for the party leadership in 1982, finishing second to Bob Rae. He served as chair of the NDP caucus, and chair of the Legislature's Social Development Committee. He also participated in select committees on the constitution, health care and education. He represented Scarborough West from 1979 to 1990, serving his last three years as the New Democratic Party's critic on education; colleges, universities and skills development; and women's issues. He was also the party's spokesperson for the disabled, and was responsible for issues affecting Metro Toronto. During his six years as Community and Social Services critic, Richard fought both inside and outside the legislature on behalf of the poor. In 1982, he publicly highlighted the plight of the poor by going on a one-month "welfare diet," living on the report called "The Other Ontario", which exposed the extent of the province's hidden poverty. In early 1987 he and his colleagues presented their report to an independent social assistance review committee. The report, called "Toward a New Ontario", recommended an overhaul of the existing social assistance system and a series of other policy changes to bring a new independence to Ontario's disadvantaged. He was a strong advocate of disarmament and in 1986 was able to move the Ontario legislature to declare Ontario nuclear-weapons-free. Also in 1986, Richard travelled to Nicaragua where he helped build a school and medical facility. From 1991 to 1995 Richard was chair of the Ontario Council of Regents. In 1996 he became a member of Trent University's Board of Directors and in 1998 became President of Centennial College in Scarborough, Ontario.

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