Showing 903 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Carrie Brady

  • Person

Carrie Brady was a student taught by the Sisters of Loretto in Lindsay, Ontario. The school building later became the first Motherhouse of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peterborough. The Loretto Convent was built in 1874 but burnt down in 1884. (Taken from: Lindsay, Past and Present, Souvenir of Old Home Week")

Carrying Place

  • Corporate body

Carrying Place is a narrow isthmus separating Weller's Bay and the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario. Carrying Place also connects Prince Edward County to the mainland. It is located 5 miles south of Trenton. Carrying Place was so named due to its location. It is situated at a point where the Indians and early settlers travelling by water had to portage to get from the Bay of Quinte to Lake Ontario. One of the first people to settle permanently in Carrying Place was Asa Weller in 1783. Robert Young, believed to the the second settler, received a land grant in 1792. Two other prominent families who helped to settle Carrying Place were the Wilkins and the Biggars. Some of these founding families' descendants still live in Carrying Place today. The first Church, St. John's Anglican, was built in 1811, and the first schoolhouse was opened in 1852. Unfortunately, Carrying Place never became the big city as was envisioned by the founding fathers.

Castleton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad.

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Catharine Parr Traill

  • Person

Catharine Parr Traill was born in Rotherhithe near London, England 9 January 1802 as Catharine Parr Strickland. She was the fifth child of Thomas and Elizabeth Strickland. She was sister to Eliza, Jane Margaret, Susanna (later Susanna Moodie), Samuel and Agnes. In 1832 she married Lt. Thomas Traill. She emigrated with her husband to Upper Canada when the opportunity provided itself and they settled near the Otonabee River near Peterborough, Upper Canada. Together they had nine children. Catharine wrote a number of works on pioneer life in Upper Canada such as The Backwoods of Canada (1834), Canadian Crusoes (1853), The Female Emigrants Guide (1854), Canadian Wild Flowers (1868) and Studies of Plant Life in Canada (1885). She also kept a journal and in it she wrote down ideas and sketches for future writings. The Old Doctor (1985) was probably written between 1835 and 1840 when John Hutchinson, a native of Kirkcaldy, Scotland, was practising medicine in Peterborough, Upper Canada. Before emigrating Catharine had published a number of children's books and stories in England. Catharine Parr Traill died 29 August 1899. (Taken from: Forest and Other Gleanings. Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1994.)

Catharine Traill Naturalists' Club

  • Corporate body

The West Island Naturalists' Club was formed in 1972. In 1974 the name was changed to the Catharine Traill Naturalists' Club in honour of one of Canada's first botanists and naturalists. The club is supported by the staff of John Abbott College and Macdonald College of McGill University. The Club intended to draw members from the Robert Baldwin, Vaudreuil and Soulange Counties but has many national and a few international members including the British Museum, which keeps Club newsletters on file. Membership has often exceeded two hundred persons. The objective of the club is to encourage conservation and foster understanding of everything in local environment and surrounding areas. This is achieved through series of lectures and field trips based on a variety of subjects found in the natural environment. The Club first dealt with its own region, but, as its membership grew it was able to help lobby for other regions.

Cavan Township

  • Corporate body

Cavan Township is located in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham which were established in 1798 by a Proclamation given by John Graves Simcoe. It is bounded on the north by the Township of Emily in Victoria County, on the west by Manvers Township, on the south by Hope Township and on the east by South Monaghan and part of Peterborough Township. It is named after a county in Northern Ireland by early settlers to the area. John Deyell from County Monaghan, Ireland was one of the first settlers to Cavan Township in 1816.

C.E. Smith Boots and Shoes

  • Corporate body

C.E. Smith Boots appears in the Farmers and Business Directory for the Counties of Durham, Northumberland, Ontario, Peterboro, and Victoria, 1890. It is listed under Ontario County in a town with a population of 275 called Zephyr. Clinton E. Smith Boots and Shoes later appears in Vernon's City of Peterborough (Ontario) Directory for 1926, and was located at 384 George Street, Peterborough. The company does not appear in the 1936 Directory, but rather lists Agnew's Shoes located at that address.

Cecil Gray Frost

  • Person

Cecil Grey Frost, younger brother of the Honourable Leslie M. Frost, was born in Orillia, Ontario, on August 27, 1897. His father, William Sword Frost, operated a jewellery and watchmaking business in Orillia, and as Mayor, introduced the concept of daylight saving time to the municipality. Cecil Grey Frost served overseas with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps during the First World War. When he returned to Canada, he attended Osgoode Hall Law School and graduated in 1921. He and his brother Leslie then opened a legal firm in Lindsay, Ontario, and both soon became active in local Conservative Politics. This led to Cecil's election in 1936 as Mayor of Lindsay, and in 1937 to the Presidency of the Ontario Conservative Association, As well, he organized and managed Earl Rowe's campaign in the provincial election of 1937. Thought of as a potential party leader himself, Cecil Grey Frost remained politically active until his sudden death on June 8, 1947.

Cecil Gray Frost

  • Person

Cecil Grey Frost, younger brother of the Honourable Leslie M. Frost, was born in Orillia, Ontario, on August 27, 1897. His father, William Sword Frost, operated a jewellery and watchmaking business in Orillia, and as Mayor, introduced the concept of daylight saving time to the municipality. Cecil Grey Frost served overseas with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps during the World War I. When he returned to Canada, he attended Osgoode Hall Law School and graduated in 1921. He and his brother Leslie then opened a legal firm in Lindsay, Ontario, and both soon became active in local Conservative Politics. This led to Cecil's election in 1936 as Mayor of Lindsay, and in 1937 to the Presidency of the Ontario Conservative Association, As well, he organized and managed Earl Rowe's campaign in the provincial election of 1937. Thought of as a potential party leader himself, Cecil Grey Frost remained politically active until his sudden death 8 June 1947.

Central Public School

  • Corporate body

Central School was the first stone common school built in the Town of Peterborough. It was built on Murray Street in 1860 and, due to the increasing number of children enrolling, another school was built immediately west of Central School in 1871. South Central School was established in 1871 on the corner of Rubidge and Sherbrooke Streets. (Taken from: "The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Canada: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) The land it was built on was purchased for $600.00 in 1873. Later known to Trent University students as Rubidge Hall which was the first building to house the University.

Charles Foran

  • Person

Charles Foran (1960- ) was born in Toronto, Ontario but has lived in Ireland, New York and China at various times. He was educated at St. Michaels College, University of Toronto and holds a Master's Degree from University College, Dublin. He is a novelist and non-fiction writer of international renown. He has been a regular contributor to Time, GQ, Saturday Night, Toronto Life, the Utne Reader, Canadian Geographic, Walrus, Globe and Mail, Rough Guide to World Music. His journalism pieces deal with sports, travel and literature. His novels include Sketches in Winter (1992), Kitchen Music (1994), The Last House of Ulster (1995), Butterfly Lovers (1997), The Story of My Life (So Far) (1998), House on Fire (2001), Carolan's Farewell (2005), Join the Revolution Comrade (2008), Mordecai: The Life and Times (2010). Foran won the Charles Taylor Prize for literary non-fiction for Mordecai in 2011. See also http://www.charlesforan.com.

Charles Latimer

  • Person

Charles Latimer was nephew of Donald Sheridan. Latimer kept in touch with friends and associates of Sheridan, especially the elderly widow of David Ingar (Marie Ingar).

Charles Rubidge

  • Person

Captain Charles Rubidge, land agent and author, was born 20 April 1787 in the Parish of St. George-in-the-East, London, England. He was the son of Robert and Margaret Rubidge. In October 1796, at the young age of nine, Rubidge entered the Navy as a midshipman on the Arrow, Sloop of War. He served under Lord Nelson and Lord Cochrane and was honourably discharged in 1815, at the end of the War of 1812. In June 1819, Rubidge emigrated to Canada with his wife and three children (they later had three more children) and in May, 1820, became the second person to settle in Otonabee Township. He assisted in the settling of the Peter Robinson immigrants in 1825 and other immigrants in 1831 and 1839. In 1831 Rubidge was appointed Immigrant Agent at Peterborough by Lord Seaton, Governor-General of Canada. He was also the author of two books. The first was A Plain Statement of the Advantages Attending Emigration to Upper Canada (London, 1838) and the second An Autobiographical Sketch (Peterborough, 1870). Captain Charles Rubidge died 5 February 1873.

Charles Vincent Massey

  • Person

Charles Vincent Massey was born in Toronto on February 20, 1887, grandson to Hart Massey who developed the farm-implement company to an international corporation. He was educated at the University of Toronto and Balliol College, Oxford, England. He was a lecturer at Victoria College, University of Toronto, in history from 1913 to 1915. He joined the army and served as staff officer in Canada and eventually worked for the war committee of the Cabinet. He was President of the Massey-Harris Co. from 1921 to 1925. At this point he joined Prime Minister Mackenzie-King's Cabinet. From 1926 to 1930 he was Canada's first minister to the United States. He became High Commissioner to Britain from 1935 to 1946. After World War II, the Prime Minister placed Vincent Massey in charge of the Royal Commission on the National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences. In his 1951 report he recommended the establishment of the Canada Council which became a reality in 1957. In 1952 Vincent Massey became Canada's first Canadian-born Governor General. He retired in 1959. Charles Vincent Massey died in London, England on December 30, 1967. (Taken from: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Chief George Paudash

  • Person

Chief George Paudash (1889-1969) was chief of the Algonquin band of Mississaugas at the Hiawatha reserve located at Rice Lake, Ontario. He was a tinsmith and an outdoors guide and served in WWI. His wife's name was Margaret (1893-1966). Chief George Paudash's son, George, served in WWII and was married to Anne Rosemary Hacker.

Choate Family

  • Family

Thomas Choate, son of Jacob Choate and Fanny Marshall Burnham, was born April 3, 1809 near Cobourg, Upper Canada. His parents had emigrated to Glanbord from Enfield, New Hampshire in 1798, along with members of the Burnham family who were cousins of the Choates. In approximately 1801, they moved to Hamilton Township, north of Cobourg, where Thomas was born, and by 1812, the family had moved to Port Hope, Upper Canada. Thomas learned the trade of millright at Warsaw, New York, and also studied music at Batavia, New York. In 1830, Thomas married Mary Wright, daughter of Richard Wright and Ann Stuart of Skiberne, County Cork, Ireland. Thomas and Mary had five children: Thomas George, Anna Eliza, Mary Jane, Richard Marshall, and Jacob Stuart. In 1834-35, Thomas was sent to Dummer Township by his uncle, the Honourable Zaccheus Burnham, to complete the construction of a saw and grist mill, which had already been started for Burnham by Thomas Hartwell. By 1836, the mill was in operation and Thomas moved his family to what was then known as Dummer Mills and built a general store. In 1842, Thomas successfully acquired the contract for a post office, and since a post office, required a village name, Thomas chose the name Warsaw. In 1839, Thomas' first wife died and he married her sister, Eliza Wright. They had two children, Harriet Burnham and Mary, before Eliza died in 1845. In 1846, Thomas married Hanah Grover, daughter of Jonah Grover and Lucia Baldwin, of Norwood, Upper Canada. Thomas and Hannah had three children: Celestia Charlotte, James Grover, and Arthur Francis. Thomas' eldest son, Thomas George, when he was old enough, took over running the mills for Zaccheus Burnham. Thomas George later established his own chair manufacturing shop on Quarry Lake. Thomas senior's main interest remained in the running of his store and post office, and with his duties as a Justice of the Peace. Thomas also established and conducted a singing school and choir which was under his tutelage for 60 years. Both he and his son, Thomas George became involved in the local temperence society and in local politics. Thomas retired from running the store in 1889, at the age of 80, and his youngest son, Arthur Francis, took over the business as manager and post master. In 1897, Arthur established a second store, Choate Supply Store, at McCraken's Landing, Stony Lake. Thomas died in 1900, at the age of 90. The Warsaw store was sold in 1927, and Arthur Francis died in 1931. The Choate Supply Store remained in business, and was managed by Arthur's wife Vida. When she died, the store was then managed by their daughter Bessie. The Choate Supply Store was sold out of the family in 1949. Arthur and Vida Elora Smith, also had a son, Richard (Dick), who was born in Warsaw in 1880. Dick was to become a journalist, artist and musician. Dick began his career with the Peterborough Examiner in 1905 and in his early days, worked for the Montreal Herald, the Buffalo Courier and some newspapers in Calgary and Vancouver. In 1908, Dick married Mary (May) Dawson Donnell, daughter of Elizabeth Ambrose and James Rea Donnell. Dick also worked in the United States for some time, and at one point in his career was a member of the Congressional Press Gallery in Washington, D.C. He later became the editor of the Toronto Daily News, editor of the Toronto Sunday World, and an editorial writer for the Toronto Globe. It is unknown when he died.

Christ Church, Bobcaygeon, Ontario

  • Corporate body

In 1869, Reverend C.W. Patterson was appointed to Bobcaygeon, Ontario. Previous to 1869, a sum of money had been collected and deposited in the Peterborough branch of the Bank of Toronto as a building fund for the construction of an Anglican Church in Bobcaygeon. It was decided in the same year that enough money had been collected and that a new church and parsonage should be built. Architect John E. Belcher was contracted to design and build the church and parsonage in 1870. On January 5, 1871, Christ Church was formally opened by the Lord Bishop of Toronto.

Claire Muller

  • Person

Claire Muller is a member of the Wilderness Canoe Association and was on the Conservation committee.

Clan McIntyre of Otonabee / Keith McIntyre

  • Family

The first McIntyre living in Otonabee, Ontario, was either Duncan McIntyre (1765-1840) or a cousin Archie McIntye. Duncan married Isobella Blair (1766-?) in 1793. They had eight children: Catharine, 1793-?; Janet, 1795-?; Isabella, 1797-?; Donald, 1799-?; Archibald, 1801-1889; John, 1803-1803; John, 1804-?; Duncan, 1806-?; and Margaret, 1809-? (born in Otonabee). Duncan became the first town warden and sat on the first board of trustees for the Presbyterian Church.

Coboconk, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company.

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Cobourg Foundry

  • Corporate body

The Cobourg Foundry was established in Cobourg, Canada West in the 1850's and was operated by Andrew Jeffrey. The foundry manufactured steam engines, boilers, agricultural equipment, axes and other useful implements. (Taken from: Spilsbury, John R. "Cobourg: Early Days and Modern Times." Cobourg: Cobourg Book Committee, 1981.)

Cobourg Harbour

  • Corporate body

The Cobourg Harbour originally was a wharf. The large steamers bringing in emigrants had to stand off shore and freight and passengers were transported by smaller boats to shore. In 1830 the Cobourg Harbour Company was formed and a proper Harbour was built. The harbour was one of the finest on the Lake Ontario shoreline. Due to the good harbour Cobourg experienced large amounts of traffic in freight and newcomers to Canada and due to this increased in size. By the 1850's Cobourg was the 5th largest centre in Canada West and it had the most important central Lake Ontario port. Cobourg had a ferry that operated between it and Rochester in New York. It was a point for shipping lumber and agricultural products all over the lake. (Taken from: "Cobourg Early Days and Modern Times." Cobourg: Cobourg Book Committee, 1981.)

Cobourg miscellanea

  • Corporate body

Cobourg is located in Hamilton Township, in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, on the north shore of Lake Ontario. The area was first settled in 1798 by Elias Nicholson who built his home within the limits of what was to become the town plot. Originally called Amherst, Cobourg has also been known by the names of Hamilton and Hardscrabble. In 1819, the developing town was given the name Cobourg. It was incorporated as a village in 1837 and incorporated as a town in 1850. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Ltd., 1972.)

Cobourg Post Office

  • Corporate body

Cobourg is located in Hamilton Township, in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, on the north shore of Lake Ontario. The area was first settled in 1798 by Elias Nicholson who built his home within the limits of what was to become the town plot. Originally called Amherst, Cobourg has also been known by the names of Hamilton and Hardscrabble. In 1819, the developing town was given the name Cobourg. The post office was established by 1831 and the first postmaster was prominent businessman and merchant James G. Bethune. Cobourg was incorporated as a village in 1837 and incorporated as a town in 1850. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Ltd., 1972.; and Guillet, E.C. "Cobourg 17798-1948." Oshawa: Goodfellow Printing Comapny Limited, 1948.)

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