Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Otonabee Township

  • Corporate body

Otonabee Township, Peterborough County, is bounded on the north by Douro Township, on the south by Rice Lake and the Otonabee River, on the west by the Otonabee River, and on the east by Asphodel Township. Otonabee township was first surveyed in 1819 and, in the same year, was settled on by George Kent. Captain Charles Rubidge also visited the township in 1819 and he returned with his family for permanent settlement in May 1820. Numerous other settlers also came to Otonabee in 1820 (approximately 23 men, some with families, some single). By 1825, 51 emigrant families, mainly from the south of Ireland, were added to the residents of Otonabee Township. These emigrants were some of the many emigrants led to Upper Canada by the Honourable Peter Robinson under the auspices of the British Government. In 1825, Dr. Gilchrist opened a grist mill and during the winter of 1829/1830, a general store was opened, both in the town of Keene. After the opening of the mill, there was an influx of settlers into the Otonabee region. By the 1861 census, the total population of Otonabee township was 4221, made up of the following nationalities: Irish (759), English (289), Scottish (412), American (37), Upper Canada (2684), Lower Canada (30), and other countries (10).

Orgill family

  • Family

The Orgill family is a branch of the Boyd family of Bobcaygeon, Ontario. Mrs. Norma Orgill (1922-2020), the donor of the collection, was the wife of Herbert Orgill, a descendant of William (Willie) Thornton Cust Boyd (1859-1919). Willie was the son of the lumbering entrepreneur Mossom Boyd (1815-1883).

Quebec Camping Association

  • Corporate body

The Quebec Camping Association Inc. was formed in 1937 and is a chartered unit of the Canadian Camping Association.The Quebec Camping Association is made up of individuals, representatives of agencies and institutions interested in the development of organized camping in the Province of Quebec. The membership includes camping directors, camp staff, institutional and agency directors, and others who are interested in or associated with camping. All types of camps (private, church, school, organizational and institutional, long and short term and day camps) are represented by the Association.The Quebec Camping Association's objectives are furthering the welfare and interests of children and adults through camping as an educative and recreative experience; raising the standard of camping practices and to be the voice of camp leaders by interpreting camping to parents, educators, the legislature and the public.(Taken from: The Quebec Camping Association)

Professor Robert Page

  • Person

Robert (Bob) J.D. Page was born in 1940 in Toronto, Ontario and received his early education in North York. He received his B.A. and M.A., in history, at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. He held an Ontario Graduate Fellowship while attending Queen's. Upon completion of his Master's degree he was awarded a Mackenzie King Foundation travelling scholarship to pursue doctoral studies in Commonwealth history at St. John's College in Cambridge, England. He was awarded a scholarship by the Beit Foundation for Commonwealth Studies while he was at Oxford. He received his D.Phil. at Oxford. In 1967 he started teaching at Trent University as an Assistant Professor in History. He taught courses in Modern Imperialism in Africa and Late Victorian Canada. He was an Assistant Professor from 1967 to 1972, an Associate Professor from 1972 to 1982 and a Professor from 1982 to 1991. While he was at Trent University he was the department and program head for the Environmental and Resource Studies (ERS) Program from 1977 to 1981 and department and program head for Canadian Heritage and Development Studies with the Leslie M. Frost Centre from 1985 to 1986. In the ERS program he taught Canadian Resource Development. He was the coordinator for the Canadian Studies Program at Trent University; director of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council; and, chair of the Canadian Environmental Advisory Council from 1972 to 1992. He also participated in the Berger and National Energy Board Hearings regarding the MacKenzie Valley Pipeline. He chaired the northern pipeline efforts of the Committee for an Independent Canada from 1972 to 1977. He prepared evidence and appeared as a witness for the Native Brotherhood of the North West Territories before the Berger Inquiry. While working in Peterborough he and his wife, Jocelyn, lived in Fraserville, Ontario. In 1991 he left Trent University to become a professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Calgary in Alberta. He has written a number of books such as "Imperialism and Canada" in 1972; "Northern Development. The Canadian Dilemma" in 1986 as well as a biography of Ontario Premier Sir George Ross and "Canadian History Since Confederation" with Bruce Hodgins in 1972 and 1978.

Raper family

  • Family

The Raper family (fl. 1890-1898) lived in the Millbrook and Cavan, Ontario area.

Lieutenant Colonel R.H. Sylvester

  • Person

Lieutenant Colonel R.H. Sylvester was the commanding officer with the 45th Regiment militia unit (Victoria and Haliburton Counties) during the early 1900's.

Receipts

  • Corporate body

Aureen Richardson

  • Person

Aureen Richardson was born 15 August 1931 and lived in Warkworth, Ontario. She married Raymond Richardson and had two sons, Raymond and Richard. She was a school teacher for 36 years, and, for 50 years, beginning in 1949, was a volunteer newspaper reporter for local newspapers on a variety of topics, including coverage of the community, churches, the disabled, local history, seniors' events, and travel. She was responsible for creating local and government interest in the erection of plaques dedicated to J.D. Kelly, St. James Anglican Church (Roseneath, Ontario), Alderville First Nation Reserve, John Weir Foote, Warkworth Cheese Country, and the Richardson archaeological site. Richardson also wrote three books, Weaving on the family loom: an anthology of Northumberland County families, Historic visions of J.D. Kelly, and Warkworth Cheese Country. From 1980 to 1986, she presented a regular four-minute "News of Northumberland" radio segment on CJBQ in Belleville, Ontario. Richardson inherited a rare neurological disease, familial spastic paraplegia, and was an advocate for the disabled throughout her life. She was a leader in Campbellford's "More Able Than Disabled" Club, was a member of the Quinte Writers' Guild and the Ontario Historical Society, and was a regular Elderhostel participant. Aureen Richardson earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at Trent University in 1974. She died 6 February 2015.

Harry M. Robbins

  • Person

Harry M. Robbins was born in 1887, and spent his early years on a farm in Oxford County. He became a career civil servant, and held the post of inspector of prisons and public charities in the Conservative regime of G. Howard Ferguson. He later became Deputy Provincial Secretary and Deputy Hospitals Minister. His civil service career ended abruptly in 1934, with the election of the Hepburn Liberals. Robbins was one of many civil servants who were fired in a general purge of the bureaucracy. Between the years of 1934 and 1939, little is known about his life, but it is generally believed that he was a bank manager in Northern Ontario. In 1939, he went to work for the Ontario Conservative party as its public relations officer, a post which he held with varying degrees of effectiveness until 1961, when he retired. He maintained an active interest in politics until his death in 1970, and he came out of retirement more than once to help local candidates in their bids for election to various offices.

Peterborough residences

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterbourgh County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875. Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Peterborough Bikeways

  • Corporate body

The Steering Committee on Bikeways was approved by Peterborough City Council in April 1975. The Peterborough Bikeway Report, published in February 1975, summarizes the interest in and potential of developed bicycle paths around Peterborough. The City Council undertook to subsidize the planning and implementation of routes in the city.

William Arthur Breyfogle

  • Person

William Arthur Breyfogle was born in Toronto in 1905. He moved with his parents to Peterborough in 1910. He went to Dartmouth College in New Hampshire and graduated with a Rhodes Scholarship in 1928. He attended Magdalen College in Oxford and later attended the University of Munich in Germany. He married Elizabeth Hopwood in 1939. He had his first short story published in 1932 in the North American Review. He had numerous works published in such magazines as Macleans, Colliers, Toronto Star Weekly, and many others. At the time of his death he had begun to write a detective novel called The Phoenix and the Tavern. William (Bill) Breyfogle died of anaphylactic shock from a bee sting in 1958.

Marjory Seeley Rogers

  • Person

Marjory Peters Seeley Rogers was born in Manitoba in 1921. She was educated at St. John's College (B.A. 1942), the University of Manitoba (Dip. in Social Work, 1944) and the University of Chicago School of Social Science Administration (1948). She married (1) Reverend Reg. S.K. Seeley, Provost of Trinity College, in 1955. He was killed in a car accident in which Marjory Seeley was seriously injured in 1957. She married (2) Professor William Rogers in 1976. Marjory Seeley Rogers was founding Principal of Lady Eaton College, Trent University (1968-1976). She was awarded Honorary Degrees by St. John's College (1974) and by Trinity College (1989).

Barbara Rooke

  • Person

Barbara Rooke was educated at Queen's University (M.A.) and the University of London (Ph.D.) where she presumably studied English literature. She was a Professor of English literature at Trent University from 1967 to 1979.

James Roddy

  • Person

James Roddy was a farmer and landowner in Cavan Township in the early 1900s.

G.M. Roche

  • Person

G.M. Roche was a Land Surveyor in Canada West during the mid 1800s.

Standen-McQueen family

  • Family

Sydney (Sid) Helmer Standen was born in 1905 in Minesing, Ontario, the son of Andrew Ronald and Ada Louisa Standen. In 1911, his family moved to Kindersley, Saskatchewan where Sid grew up. He later became a teacher and also served in World War II.

Euphemia (Effie) Young McQueen was born in 1903 in London, England, daughter of James and Margaret McQueen (nee Drysdale). In Effie’s first year, the McQueens moved to Scotland and then, in 1913, to Canada, where they settled in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Effie became a teacher and appeared in theatrical performances and recitations.

Sid and Effie married in 1930 and settled in Hanley, Saskatchewan. They had four sons: Philip Andrew, Neil McQueen, Sydney Drysdale (Dale), and Eric James William; Philip died in 1955 at the age of 22 during a tactical flight training exercise near Chatham, New Brunswick. In 1942, Sid and Effie moved to Burnaby, British Columbia where they were to spend the remainder of their lives. After Effie’s death in 1965, Sid married Gladys Marshall; he died in 1975. (Taken from “Standens and McQueens: A Canadian Story of Migrant Families” by S. Dale Standen, 2014).

St. Anne's Parish

  • Corporate body

St. Anne's Parish was established in 1956 at 859 Barnardo Avenue in Peterborough, Ontario. The Parish had the St. Anne's Catholic Women's League, sports activities such as hockey and softball leagues and the St. Anne's Boy Scout Association. They organized fun fairs and picnics. St. Anne's School was nearby for the parishioners to use.

Ontario. Royal Commission on the Northern Environment

  • Corporate body

The Royal Commission on the Northern Environment (Ontario) was established 13 July 1977 by an Order-in-Council of the Ontario Cabinet. The Commission was established pursuant to The Public Inquiries Act of 1971 and furthering the purpose of The Environmental Assessment Act of 1975 which dealt with the betterment of the people, of the whole or any part of Ontario, by providing for the protection, conservation and wise management in Ontario of the environment. It was created to inquire into any beneficial and adverse effects on the environment for the people of Ontario of any public or private enterprise north of the 50th parallel of north latitude relating to harvesting, supply and use of timber resources, mining, milling, smelting, oil and gas extraction, hydro-electric development, nuclear power development, water use, tourism and recreation, transportation, communications or pipelines. The Commission also inquired into methods that should be used in the future to assess, evaluate and make decisions concerning the effects on the environment of major enterprises and to report and make recommendations to the Minister of the Environment from time to time and to carry out the purpose of the Environmental Assessment Act of 1975. The Commission gathered information by holding informal meetings in communities such as Timmins, Geraldton, Nakina, Moosonee, Moose Factory, Sioux Lookout, Dryden, Red Lake, Ear Falls, Pickle Lake, Osnaburgh, Sandy Lake, Kenora, Whitedog and Toronto. The purpose of these meetings was to gather information about the north, its people, its communities and resources by means of submissions from government departments, northern communities, northern residents and a wide range of organizations and enterprises with experience and knowledge of the north of Ontario. The Commission also heard submissions relating to issues that it needed to address, the roles it should play and the manner in which its inquiries were to be conducted. Submissions ranged from women and health services to trappers and methanol production. There were community and native people historical surveys as well as community and business officials' responses to reports published by the Commission.

Rubidge family

  • Family

Captain Charles Rubidge, land agent and author, was born 20 April 1787 in the Parish of St. George-in-the-East, London, England. He was the son of Robert and Margaret Rubidge. In October 1796, at the young age of nine, Rubidge entered the Navy as a midshipman on the Arrow, Sloop of War. He served under Lord Nelson and Lord Cochrane and was honourably discharged in 1815, at the end of the War of 1812. In June 1819, Rubidge emigrated to Canada with his wife and three children (they later had three more children) and in May, 1820, became the second person to settle in Otonabee Township. He assisted in the settling of the Peter Robinson immigrants in 1825 and other immigrants in 1831 and 1839. In 1831 Rubidge was appointed Immigrant Agent at Peterborough by Lord Seaton, Governor-General of Canada. He was also the author of two books. The first was A Plain Statement of the Advantages Attending Emigration to Upper Canada (London, 1838) and the second An Autobiographical Sketch (Peterborough, 1870). Captain Charles Rubidge died 5 February 1873.

Smith-Ennismore Historical Society

  • Corporate body

Smith-Ennismore Historical Society was formed in 1983 and incorporated in 1985. The Society actively publishes historical works on the local area and provides research assistance to genealogists and school children.

Herman Witsius Ryland

  • Person

Herman Witsius Ryland, clerk of the Executive Council of Lower Canada, was born in Northampton, England, in 1760. In 1781 he came to America as assistant deputy-paymaster-general of the British forces, and served throughout the last stages of the American Revolutionary War. On the evacuation of New York in 1784, he returned to England with Sir Guy Carleton. When Carleton, as Lord Dorchester, was appointed governor-general of British North America under the Act of 1791, Ryland, in 1793, came out to Canada as his secretary. He was appointed both clerk and civil secretary of the Executive Council, and for many years he exercised a great influence on the government of Canada. He was the confidential adviser of Sir James Craig, but was dismissed from office by Sir George Prevost as civil secretary in 1812. He continued, however, as clerk of the Executive Council until his death; and he was appointed in 1813 a member of the Legislative Council. He died at Beauport, near Quebec, on July 20, 1838. A selection of his papers is printed in R. Christie, "History of Lower Canada," vol. vi (Quebec, 1854). (taken from "The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography, fourth edition. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1978.)

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