Showing 894 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Andrew Finnie II

  • Person

Andrew Finnie II was born in 1820 and emigrated from Scotland to Canada with his brothers in 1840. Around 1850, Finnie settled on Lot 12 Concession 2 in South Monaghan Township. He and his wife, Jane Chambers, had thirteen children of which eleven lived to adulthood. Some moved to Manitoba and sent photographs over the years to the family who remained on the South Monaghan homestead; the homestead to this day is still in possession of Finnie heirs. Andrew Finnie II died in 1908.

Andrew Mather

  • Person

Andrew Mather and his wife, Ann Patterson, came from Belford, Northumberland County, England to Canada in the 1820's. They brought with them their family of four sons and three daughters. Andrew Mather acquired 400 acres of land, Lots 8 and 9, Concession 9, in Otonabee Township, Upper Canada. The Mather family established a farm on the land which they named "Belford Farm" in honour of their former place of residence in England. Andrew's son, Thomas P. moved several miles north of Belford Farm and built his home on the southwest corner of a cross road. The location is now known as Mather's Corners. (Taken from: Nelson, D. Gayle. Forest to Farm: Early Days in Otonabee. Keene: The Keene, Otonabee 150th Anniversary Committee, 1975.)

Anna Leveridge

  • Person

Anna Maria Leveridge (nee Godbolt) was born in Harleston, Norfolk, England in 1846. She married David Leveridge (1840-1930) and together they had eight children between 1870 and 1887. The Leveridge family emigrated to Canada in approximately 1883 where they settled on a homestead near Coe Hill, Ontario. Anna Leveridge died in 1928.

Annapolis Royal

  • Corporate body

Annapolis Royal (Port Royal) in Nova Scotia is the site of the first European settlement in Canada. It was settled three years before Quebec City in Quebec and two years before Virginia in the United States. A settlement was established in 1605 in the Annopolis Basin by the French. At first it consisted of a wooden palisade, a few small huts or homes and a church. A Governor's house was added to the fort and buildings for munitions and military personnel. Most of the settlers lived outside of the fort area. Eventually the fort was rebuilt of earth and then stone. By 1671 there were approximately 68 families living in Annapolis Royal and by 1686 the population had reached 231 civilians. By arms or treaty the settlement changed hands between the French and the English a total of seven times. In 1710 the English captured Annapolis Royal for the last time. The Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 had the French give her possessions of Acadia and Newfoundland to the Crown of Britain forever. In 1710 Annapolis Royal had been captured by General Nicholas who was later to become the Governor of all of Nova Scotia in 1714. Annapolis Royal was governed by Colonel Vetch of the 1710 war. In 1714 the Queen encouraged Governor Francis Nicholson to allow the French residents to retain their land and tenements or to sell their land. English settlement was encouraged. In 1719 Colonel Phillips replaced Governor Nicolson. By 1720 there were approximately 12 English families living in Annapolis Royal near the fort. (Taken from: MacVicar, W.M. "A Short History of Annapolis Royal, the Port Royal of the French..." Toronto: The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, 1897. microfiche CIHM 09502.)

Anne Innis Dagg

  • Person

Professor Anne Innis Dagg has a Ph.D. in biology and teaches at the University of Waterloo. She is author of The Feminine Gaze and MisEducation: Women & Canadian Universities.

Anthony Cekota

  • Person

Anthony Cekota was senior officer of the Bata Footwear division of Bata Industries Limited in Batawa, Ontario. He visited Trent University in 1989. Trent University's Thomas J. Bata Library is named after Thomas Bata, who provided substantial financial support to the University.

Arbor Theatre

  • Corporate body

Arbor Theatre began in Peterborough in 1976 when John Plank arrived to direct "The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds" for the Peterborough Theatre Guild. The following year, local support led to the creation of Arbor Productions and John Plank directed "Private Lives" followed by "Belle of Amherst" and "Lady Audley's Secret" in 1978. In 1979 the group was reorganized as a professional theatre company performing during the summer season at Trent University's Wenjack Theatre.

Archivia

  • Corporate body

The Library and Archives Canada was established in 1872 to acquire and preserve materials of lasting national significance.

Arthur B. Bailey

  • Person

Arthur B. Bailey was a sports enthusiast who lived in Mount Pleasant, Ontario at the turn of the century. He was also the catcher on the Mount Pleasant baseball team for the 1914 season.

Arthur G. Racey

  • Person

Born in 1870 in Quebec, A.G. Racey attended McGill University where he developed an interest in caricature. His cartoons were first published in the Montreal Witness, and later, in the Montreal Star where he worked as cartoonist from 1899 to 1941. Racey is also recognized for his oil and water colour paintings, many of which hang in private collections throughout Canada. Racey died in Montreal on December 21, 1941.

Arthur Greig Fleming

  • Person

Arthur Greig Fleming was a resident of Kirkaldy, Fifeshire, Scotland. He married Elizabeth Arnot in the early 1800's. They had at least two children, David and Sandford who emigrated to Canada in 1845. Sandford later became Sir Sandford Fleming, well known railway surveyor and construction engineer. In 1847, David Fleming was living in Toronto, Canada West. Arthur and Elizabeth travelled to Canada in 1847 after July. It is possible that they emigrated to Canada as well.

Arthur James Marshall Smith

  • Person

Arthur James Marshall Smith was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1902. He was educated at McGill University and received his B.A. in 1925 and his M.A. in 1926. In 1931 he received his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. At McGill University Smith edited the "McGill Daily Literary Supplement" from 1924 to 1925. When is was discontinued, Smith, along with F.R. Scott, founded and edited the "The McGill Fortnightly Review" in 1925. This was the first journal to publish modernist poetry and critical opinion in Canada. Throughout his lifetime, Smith's works were published in anthologies, and he became recognized nationally as a poet, critic and anthologist. He taught English at several American colleges before accepting a position, teaching English, at Michigan State University from 1936 until his retirement in 1972. Michigan University, upon his retirement, created the A.J.M. Smith Award, given annually for a noteworthy volume by a Canadian poet. Among Smith's most distinguished awards were the Governor General's Award in 1943, for "News of the phoenix and other poems", and the Lorne Pierce Medal in 1966. (Taken from: "Poets Between the Wars." Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited, 1969.) In 1978 A.J.M. Smith received an honorary Doctorate of Letters from Trent University. Trent University received a number of books and papers from Smith and a room on the first floor of the Bata Library was dedicated to him. In 1980 A.J.M. Smith died.

Arthur Thibert

  • Person

Arthur Thibert was an oblate who served from 1927-1936 in the Saint Joseph and the Mother of the Saviour Roman Catholic mission in the Southampton Island and Baker Lake area of northern Canada. A work by Thibert, Eskimo-English, English-Eskimo dictionary = Inuktitut-English, English-Inuktitut Dictionary, has been published.

Association for Canadian Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) was founded in 1973 at Queen's University as a Pan-Canadian, non-profit organization which sought to promote a knowledge of Canada at the post-secondary level through teaching, research, and publications. A founding member of the International Council for Canadian Studies, the ACS is also a member of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and the Social Science Federation of Canada. The objectives of the Association was to promote multidisciplinary and comparative perspectives, and to encourage exchanges and co-operation between the numerous programs, centres, study groups, institutes and other organizations working in the field of Canadian, Quebec, and regional studies.

Association of Canadian Universities For Northern Studies

  • Corporate body

The Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS) was founded in 1977 at Churchill, Manitoba and legally incorporated in March, 1987. The main founder of the Association was Professor Trevor Lloyd. Members include Universities across Canada, of which Trent University is one, that have an interest in Northern Studies. The Association does four types of work. It offers mutual assistance among member-universities in research, shared use of facilities, interchange of staff and students, the provision and use of libraries, preparation of bibliographies etc.; provision of assistance to northern residents through research, teacher training and higher education; makes available the knowledge, skills and services of universities to the Governments of Canada, the Provinces and Territories and to industry and the community at large; and, contributes towards Canada's international commitments for scientific information and research on the polar regions and increasing the exchange of scholars, students and information between polar countries. (Taken from: ACUNS - AUCEN Constitution and By-laws, 1979, page i.) The association has held annual conferences since 1979 at Chicoutimi, Quebec (1979), Trent University (1980), Calgary, Alberta (1981), Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario (1982) and at Regina in Saskatchewan (1983).

Atwood family

  • Family

The Atwood family is associated with nineteenth-century settlement in the Lakefield, Ontario region. James Parr Clinton Atwood (1836-1912) immigrated to Canada from Gloucestershire in 1855 and married Anne Traill Fotheringhame (Annie) Traill (1838-1931), daughter of Thomas Traill and Catharine Parr Traill, in 1858. Together they had seven children: Henry, Emily, Clinton, Katharine, George, Anne, and Florence. The Atwood family is related to the Upper Canada pioneer Traill, Moodie, and Strickland families.

Aureen Richardson

  • Person

Aureen Richardson was born 15 August 1931 and lived in Warkworth, Ontario. She married Raymond Richardson and had two sons, Raymond and Richard. She was a school teacher for 36 years, and, for 50 years, beginning in 1949, was a volunteer newspaper reporter for local newspapers on a variety of topics, including coverage of the community, churches, the disabled, local history, seniors' events, and travel. She was responsible for creating local and government interest in the erection of plaques dedicated to J.D. Kelly, St. James Anglican Church (Roseneath, Ontario), Alderville First Nation Reserve, John Weir Foote, Warkworth Cheese Country, and the Richardson archaeological site. Richardson also wrote three books, Weaving on the family loom: an anthology of Northumberland County families, Historic visions of J.D. Kelly, and Warkworth Cheese Country. From 1980 to 1986, she presented a regular four-minute "News of Northumberland" radio segment on CJBQ in Belleville, Ontario. Richardson inherited a rare neurological disease, familial spastic paraplegia, and was an advocate for the disabled throughout her life. She was a leader in Campbellford's "More Able Than Disabled" Club, was a member of the Quinte Writers' Guild and the Ontario Historical Society, and was a regular Elderhostel participant. Aureen Richardson earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at Trent University in 1974. She died 6 February 2015.

Barbara Rooke

  • Person

Barbara Rooke was educated at Queen's University (M.A.) and the University of London (Ph.D.) where she presumably studied English literature. She was a Professor of English literature at Trent University from 1967 to 1979.

Barclay McKone

  • Person

Dr. Barclay McKone (1914-2006) completed his medical training in the mid-1940s and went directly into treating those with tuberculosis in Hamilton, and later tuberculosis rehabilitation work in London, Ontario. From there he was invited by the Director of Indian Health Services to become the medical superintendent of the Moose Factory Indian Hospital, a task he undertook on 1 January 1951 and held until August 1954. In 1955 he led one unit of three which undertook a major medical expedition through the eastern Arctic to investigate illness in the area.

Bark family

  • Family

The Bark family resided in Toronto, Ontario during the early 1900's and spent their vacation time at their cottage, "Lingerlonger Lodge" which was located on the shores of Moore Lake, just south of Minden, Ontario.

Bateson family

  • Family

The Bateson family consisted of George who married Mary (?) and lived in Penetanguishene; Isaac Newton who married Margaret (?) and lived in Dowagiac, Michigan in the United States; Jane who married a Robert Russell (farmer) and lived in Scotland County, Missouri in the United States; Eliza who married James Morrison and lived in Lindsay, Ontario; Margaret who married James Marshall (Carriage-maker) and lived in the village of Cannington, Ontario; Letitia who married William Henry McCardle (labourer) and lived in Midland, Ontario; Mary Eleanor who married Thomas Richardson (blacksmith) and also lived in Midland, Ontario; and William who married Harriet (?) and lived in Bailieboro, Ontario. These nine people were children of Isaac (died January 22, 1880) and Ellen (died September 13, 1900) Bateson of Cavan Township. William Bateson died January 28, 1930. It is unknown who Thomas and John Bateson are except that they were executers of Isaac Bateson's Last Will and Testatment.

Baulch family

  • Family

The Baulch family were tailors who lived in Hampton, Ontario and Port Hope, Ontario. Members of the family include Joseph H. and his wife Laura, Henry N., R. Baulch, and Will Baulch, Rochester, New York.

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