Showing 900 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Energy Savers Peterborough

  • Corporate body

The Energy Savers Peterborough (ESP) was established in May, 1982. It was founded to promote energy conservation in the City and County of Peterborough. ESP was a project that was considered one of-a-kind and was studied by the Ontario Ministry of Energy and Conservation as a way to make communities more energy efficient. It was started in the 1980's due to the wealth of information on energy conservation which was confusing people due to all the different sources and resources. The idea behind ESP was to sort the information out and give it to people at a local level and thereby increase community awareness of energy conservation. In their first year of operation ESP established a storefront in Peterborough Square, on the Corner of Water and Charlotte Streets, where they were able to give free non-partisan advice. They also offered successful workshops for arena and curling rink operators, energy saving seminars to churches, clinics for local media members and fleet operators on how to drive to save gas, a tire-check program and tours of solar-heated homes in the area. ESP helped the local Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) Residential Energy Advisory Program (REAP) establish conservation consciousness in the community. The ESP committee was chaired by Professor Peter Adams of Trent University.

Enid Mallory

  • Person

Enid (nee Swerdferger) Mallory was born at Glen Stewart, near Ottawa, Ontario, in 1938. She resides in Peterborough, Ontario, and together with her husband, Gord Mallory, operated Peterborough Publishing. She is the author of several books including: Over the Counter: The County Stores in Canada, Coppermine: the Far North of George M. Douglas, Kawartha: Living on these Lakes, and Countryside Kawartha. She was also a member of the Friends of the Bata Library and is active in pursuing her interest in Peterborough local history.

Erik Loder

  • Person

Erik Loder was born in 1933 in Wilmington, Delaware. He was educated at Bard College and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Pratt. He taught drawing, print-making and painting at a number of colleges in the United States before moving with his wife Robin Loder to Canada in 1972 to live and work. He taught numerous courses at Sir Sandford Fleming College and in the Cultural Studies department at Trent University from 1980 until his death in 1993. His work was exhibited widely in Peterborough, Toronto, the United States and in Europe.

Ernest Thompson Seton

  • Person

Ernest Thompson Seton was born August 14, 1860 and changed his name from Ernest Evan Thompson in 1898. He was born in England and came to the United States in 1898. He died October 23, 1946 in Santa Fe, New Mexico is buried at Seton Village, Santa Fe. He is best known as the founder of the Boy Scouts of America. He studied art in Toronto, New York, London and Paris. He worked as an illustrator for several publishers and as a naturalist for the Government of Manitoba. He published his first children's book "Wild Animals I have Known" in 1898. He published a large number of children's and nature books as well as numerous articles. (Taken from: "Contemporary Authors." Hal May, ed. 1983.)

Ethelwyn Campbell

  • Person

Ethelwyn Campbell (1926-) was a typing teacher in the Fort Frances, Ontario area in 1972. By 1976 she was living in Islington, Ontario and taught business at the Central Commerce School in Toronto. In 2002 she was living in Perth, Ontario. She is a world traveler.

Eugene A. Forsey

  • Person

The Honourable Eugene A. Forsey was born in 1904 in Grand Bank, Newfoundland. He attended McGill University, and Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. In the 1930s, Forsey drafted the Regina Manifesto, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF)'s founding declaration of policy, and ran for public office four times for the CCF. He served as a lecturer in economics and political science from 1929-1941 at McGill, and held the post of director of research for the Canadian Congress of Labour (known as the Canadian Labour Congress from 1956-1966) from 1942 to 1966. Forsey directed a special centennial project, 'a history of Canadian unions, 1812-1902', from 1966-1969, and served on a committee which founded Labour/Le Travail. Forsey was regarded as one of the foremost experts on the Canadian constitution and taught Canadian Government and Canadian labour history at Carleton University and the University of Waterloo. He was a member of Senate from 1970-1979, and was named to the Privy Council in 1985. Forsey received numerous honorary degrees, including one from Trent University in 1978, and was chancellor of Trent University from 1973-1977. Forsey died on February 20, 1991. (Taken from web site https://www.parl.ca/)

Eugene Fredrick Eggleton

  • Person

Eugene Fredrick Eggleton was born April 13, 1889 in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York in the United States of America. He had a sister named Jane A. Eggleton . He lost a finger and three toes at the Waterbury Manufacturing Co. of Waterbury, Conneticut before he joined the military. He left the country on June 12, 1915 to participate in World War I. He was honorably discharged from the United States Army on November 26, 1918. He had received a Silver Bronze Victory button at his discharge. On June 14, 1922 he married Elisabeth Ann Kelly in Peterborough, Ontario. Leo Eggleton, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvannia, was a witness. Eugene and Ann moved to Pennsylvannia where they had a daughter Mary Patricia Eggleton on August 24, 1924.

Executive Council state and land books

  • Corporate body

Jacques Cartier is credited with the discovery of the country of Canada in 1535. The area which was first considered Canada was the area around Stadacona, later known as Quebec City. The name Canada later became synonymous with New France in the 1600's. As French explorers and fur traders pushed westward and southward in their travels, the area to which Canada referred to increased, but specific geographic boundaries were never firmly established. In 1791, the Constitutional Act, or Canada Act divided Canada, also known as Quebec at this time, into the two distinct provinces of Upper Canada and Lower Canada. In 1841, the provinces were united to form the Province of Canada. The British North America Act of 1867 united the Province of Canada (now divided into the provinces of Ontario and Quebec) with Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. This union created the Dominion of Canada. At first, the geographic area was relatively small, but it rapidly grew with the purchase of Rupert's Land in 1870 which extended the country to the Rocky Mountains in the west and to the Arctic Ocean in the north. In 1871 British Columbia joined Confederation, extending the country from sea to sea. Prince Edward Island joined Canada in 1873 and Britain handed over title to the arctic islands in 1880. The geography of Canada as we know it today was completed in 1949 when Newfoundland and Labrador joined the Dominion of Canada. The name Canada is taken from the Huron Iroquois word "kanata", meaning village, or settlement.

Fair family

  • Family

John and Mary Anne Fair had a number of children. The oldest daughter, Martha Jane Fair married William Hall. John and Mary Anne's second son was John Joseph Fair. Their youngest daughter was Caroline Fair and she held a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Federal Cultural Policy Review Committee

  • Corporate body

The Federal Cultural Policy Review Committee (F.C.P.R.C.) was created in August 1980 by the Honourable Francis Fox, Secretary of State and Minister of Communications, to review Canadian cultural institutions and cultural policy. This was the first such commission since the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences of 1949-1951. The F.C.P.R.C. grew from an Advisory Commission on Cultural Policy which had been established in November 1979 by the Honourable David MacDonald. The committee held public hearings and developed its own recommendations. Known as the Applebaum-Hebert Commission after Louis Applebaum and Jacques Hebert, the Final Report was released in 1982.

Fenian Raids

  • Corporate body

The Fenian Raids were a result of the Irish-American movement. The movement was created in 1857 by the Irish in an attempt to gain their independence from Britain. American John O'Mahony raised large amounts of money for the movement's leader James Stephens, who resided in Ireland, to use in Ireland to procure independence. The movement was popular with Irish-Americans and by 1865 there were approximately 10,000 Civil War Veterans organized into military clubs. They had approximately $500,000.00 and at this time split into two different factions. One led by John O'Mahony and the other led by William Roberts. A small Canadian group of Fenians was organized by Michael Murphy in Toronto. Roberts wanted to invade Canada and O'Mahony wanted to help Ireland. When no uprising occurred in Ireland O'Mahony led a raid on the New Brunswick border in the spring of 1866 which failed. Altogether there were 5 raids on, and into, the Canadas. There was another raid in June of 1866 led by Roberts who defeated the militia at Ridgeway near Niagara. The third raid also occurred in the same June at Missisquoi Bay. There were 2 raids in 1870 on the Quebec border led by John O'Neill. In 1867 there was an Irish uprising in Ireland which failed and with it the Fenian movement disintegrated. (Taken from: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Fern Rahmel

  • Person

Fern Alma Rahmel was born in Peterborough in 1914. She attended Peterborough Normal School in 1932-1933 and was editor of the 1932-1933 year book. She taught in elementary and later secondary schools. In 1970 she had been a Peterborough teacher for 20 years with the English Department of the Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School (PCVS). She was Department Head before she retired. She was also assistant to Gwyn Kinsey, editor of Saturday Night. She was an active participant in theatre and writing. Fern aided Robertson Davies in research while he was editor of the Peterborough Examiner. She wrote children's educational radio plays for CBC. In the 1970 Spring Convocation, Trent University awarded her a honorary Doctor of Laws degree. She was a sustaining member of the Friends of the Bata Library and had been since its inception. She gave talks to the Peterborough Historical Society and published an occasional paper on F.M. de la Fosse, Peterborough's first librarian. Fern Rahmel died 28 November 2009.

Fire Insurance Plans

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Fisher Gauge Ltd.

  • Corporate body

Fisher Gauge Ltd. is a family-owned business that was founded in Peterborough, Ontario in 1942 by toolmaker and designer R.F. (Bill) Fisher. Its earliest customers were General Electric, Westinghouse, Western Electric, and Massey Harris. The company, now known as FisherCast Global, manufactures special-purpose die casting components for customers world-wide (information taken from FisherCast Global Web site, 2004).

Flavelles Limited

  • Corporate body

Flavelles originated in 1860 with the partnership between J.R. Dundas and Mr. Claxton. They operated a general store on Kent Street in Lindsay, Canada West. In 1872 J.D. Flavelle, a nephew of J.R. Dundas, became a partner when Mr. Claxton retired. In 1877 W. Flavelle joined the business and the business became Dundas & Flavelle Brothers. The company expanded under the Flavelle brothers into the grain market. They acquired the controlling interest in the flour mill near Lindsay Street and called it the Flavelle Milling Company until it sold out to the Canadian Cereal Company in 1912. Around the same time a growing produce business handling eggs, butter, cheese and poultry was developed. A warehouse on King Street was built to store products and eventually branch plants in Port Perry, Belleville, Alliston, Chatham and London were established. Later on a coal and builders' supply department was added to the Lindsay business. The merchandise used in the store was purchased from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. The first export business in eggs, butter, cheese and poultry occured in 1888 when W. Flavelle, who was a regular member on the British Isles business trips, decided that it was a good idea to ship produce and use the proceeds on future merchandise purchases. In 1895 J.R. Dundas died and his stock was purchased by other partners. In 1900 a provincial charter was obtained under the name of Dundas and Flavelles Ltd. and by 1904, with another charter, the name was changed to Flavelles Ltd. The Victoria Creamery was puchased in 1912. In 1916 the cold storage warehouse on King Street burnt to the ground while it was full of produce. Only the power house, which was in a separate brick building, was saved. A new brick warehouse, which was a cold storage and creamery, was built on the corner of Kent and Victoria Streets in 1917. After 1918 a separate charter in the name of the Lindsay Creamery Limited was obtained and the Flavelle family, who were the controlling shareholders of the business, operated the creamery for a number of years. In 1925 the business was merged with other department stores throughout Ontario and became known as Canadian Department Stores and eventually these stores were taken over by the T. Eaton Company. Flavelles had associations with Hall's Limited of Lindsay and H. R. Scott Limited of Peterborough. (Taken from: Flavelles Limited fonds. 92-003-1.) For photographs of the Sadler, Dundas & Flavelle's Flour Mill, Dundas & Flavelle Bro's store and the Dundas and Flavelle Bro's Egg House see accession 92-010 (Dorothy Choate Herriman fonds) Box 5, Folder 15.

Fortnightly Club

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Fortnightly Club was encouraged, by F.M. de la Fosse (?-1945) the librarian at the Public Library, to meet during the winter months and discuss learned talks by fellow members. (Taken from: "Peterborough The Electric City." Burlington: Greater Peterborough Chamber of Commerce, 1987.)

Fowlds family and business

  • Family

Henry Fowlds was born in 1790 in Scotland and married in 1813 to Jane Marshall Steele. Together they had ten children (Eliza, John, James S., Robert H., Elizabeth, Henry M., Mary C., William J., Mary Anne, and Theresa) of which only five survived (James S., Elizabeth, Henry M., William J., and Theresa). The family came to North America in 1821, settling first in New York, and then in Hartford in 1833. In 1834, they crossed the border and settled in Prince Edward County, Upper Canada. The Fowld's family settled in Asphodel Township in 1836, and then moved on to Westwood, where they set up a saw mill in conjunction with Dr. John Gilchrist in what was to become the village of Keene. On September 27, 1851, Henry Fowlds purchased from the Honourable James Crooks the water rights, lands and buildings then known as Crooks' Rapids, and later as Hastings. The Fowlds built upon this base, expanding their original saw mill to a corporate busisness of saw mill, grist mill, general store and post office. The three Fowlds' brothers, James, Henry M. and William, set up a lumber and flour business under the name of Jas. L. Fowlds and Bros. This company was terminated with the death of James Fowlds in 1884. The Fowlds were quite active in Hastings, occupying the seat of reeve, and the office of postmaster. James S. (1818-1884) married Margaret MacGregor and they had nine children between the years of 1845 and 1860. Their seventh child, Frederick W. (1857-1930), married Elizabeth Sutherland and they had three children, Helen, Eric, and Donald. Eric and Donald were soldiers in World War I and Helen was a nurse in the same war. Helen married Gerald Marryat after the war and became a remarkable local historian of the Peterborough region.

Frances Anne Stewart

  • Person

Frances Anne Stewart (nee Browne) was born May 24, 1794, daughter of Reverend Francis Browne and Anna Maria Noble, in Dublin, Ireland. In 1796, Rev. Browne died quite suddenly in front of his wife. The resulting shock left Frances' mother somewhat of an invalid until she died in 1809. Frances was left in the care of her great-uncle, Robert Waller in Allanstown, Ireland, where she was raised by Harriet Beaufort, who managed the household. Harriet was a well educated young woman, and sought to give Frances the same quality of education. Under Harriet's instruction, Frances received a much more academic education than was the norm for young girls of those days. In the summer of 1816, Frances, and her aunt Susan went to visit some distant friends, the Stewarts, who lived near Belfast. This is where Frances met her future husband, Thomas Alexander Stewart (1786-1847). They were married December 16, 1816. Thomas worked for the firm of Robert Reid and Son, which manufactured linen, cotton and silk. When the company ran into trouble, and eventually bankruptcy, Frances and Thomas decided to emigrate to Canada. The Stewarts went with Thomas' brother-in-law, and former business partner, Robert Reid and his family. The party of 27 set sail from Belfast Lough, on June 1, 1822. Seven weeks were spent on the ship before reaching Quebec. From there they traveled to Kingston, and then on to York, where Stewart and Reid were each granted 1200 acres, provided they settled in an unsurveyed township. Douro Township was suggested as a promising region. On September 9, 1822, Stewart and Reid traveled to the area with Richard Birdsall, the surveyor, and each chose land on the Otonabee River. Life in Douro Township was very isolated for Frances, but she managed well on her own, looking after her home and children. Thomas Stewart died in 1847 from typhoid fever, and Frances Anne died several years later on February 24, 1872 at Goodwood. Extensive biographical information on the Stewart family, plus friends, neighbours, and associates, may be found in accession 02-001.

Francis Frape

  • Person

Francis Frape was born December 10, 1898 in Kingston, Ontario. He was the son of May Ryan and Arthur Ernest Frape and had at least one brother, two years younger than her, also named Arther Ernest. Both Francis and his brother enlisted into the Canadian military during World War I. Francis served as a sergeant in both France and north Russia for the 16th Brigade when he was 20 years of age. His enlistment and involvement in WWI began a life long carrier within the Canadian military where he engaged in continuous military training. He was decorated with Distinguished Conduct Medal in 1919. In 1922 he married Lillian Mabel Robson (born December 2, 1903.) They had at least on child named Francis (Frank) Frape. In 1928 he was promoted to be Warrant Officer Class II and Company Sergeant Major Instructor in Kingston. In 1938 Francis was appointed to be Camp Sergeant-Major for the Cannaught Camp in Ontario and in the following year was awarded The Canadian Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct. By the end of his military carrier he reach the rank of Captain. In 1982 Lillian and Frank celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary.

Francis J.A. Morris

  • Person

Francis J.A. Morris (1869-1949) was born in a parsonage near the town of Crieff, in Perthshire, Scotland. Living in the country, he developed a passion for nature very early in life, and, with his brother, Charles, he enthusiastically investigated the various forms of flora and fauna in the countryside. Morris' father died when he was thirteen, and the family was forced to move to a suburb of London. There he entered Dalwich College to study the Classics and English Literature, and with his brother and a friend, continued to make excursions into the country to collect insects. Through his studies, Frank developed an interest in Darwin and the theory of evolution. Later, he continued his study of the Classics and English Literature at Balliot College, Oxford. His encounters with Wordsworth's poetry added to his own emotional feelings towards nature. In 1895, at the age of twenty-five, Frank Morris came to Canada and attended the School of Pedagogy in Toronto. There, he came under the influence of Dr. William Brodie who introduced him to Canadian natural history. In 1896, Morris joined the staff of Smith's Falls High School. There, the science teacher taught Morris some basic scientific botany and the use of identification keys. In 1899, he returned to Toronto to carry on more pedagogic study. By 1900, he had become the Classics Master at Trinity College School in Port Hope. He spent thirteen years there, during which time he married Miss Elma Walker. In 1911, he attended the University of Toronto to take a Master of Arts Degree and a Specialists Certificate in Classics. In 1913, he was appointed to the staff of the Peterborough Collegiate Institute, where he first taught Classics and later became head of the English Department. He remained in this position until ill health forced him to retire in 1936. Francis J.A. Morris died 31 December 1949.

Frank Beazer

  • Person

Frank C. Beazer was born in Chippenham, England. He left Chippenham in 1912 and worked in Ifracombe, Eastbourne, London and Bath in England. He was a ship's steward on two trips to East Africa before he became a missionary to the Church of England Camp Mission. The first place he went to as a missionary was the diocese of Caribou in British Columbia. He enlisted in Chapleau, Ontario, in the 227 B Company, on July 26, 1916 and travelled to France with the 54th Battalion where he became assistant to the regimental chaplain. In 1919 he attended Wycliffe College at the University of Toronto and received his ordination on St. Georges Day in 1922 in the Cathedral in Cochrane, Ontario. He resided at Kapuskasing for twelve years. In Kapuskasing he helped to build his church and house. He was also an assistant scoutmaster for the Boy Scouts of Canada in Kapuskasing. In 1927 he married Gertrude Hudson of Toronto. He was the pastor for Oxford Mills, Carrying Place and St. Paul's Anglican Church in Roslin, Ontario; Christ Anglican Church in Thomasburg, Ontario and St. Luke's Anglican Church in Peterborough, Ontario. In 1958 Reverend Beazer and his wife visited his two brothers in Chippenham, England. While they were there they were invited to have cocktails with the High Commissioner of Canada George Drew and his wife. Frank was a member of the Masonic Lodge.

Results 226 to 250 of 900