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People, Organizations, and Families
Corporate body

Aikenhead Hardware Company

  • Corporate body

In 1830 a new hardware store, also known as an ironmongery, was opened on the north-east corner of King and Yonge Streets in York (now Toronto), known as Ridout's Hardware Store. In 1845 a Board of Trade was organized and George P. Ridout was named its first president. In 1845 James Aikenhead joined the firm of Ridout Bros. & Co. In 1868 James Aikenhead became a member of the firm which at this point was renamed to Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. On September 1, 1873 James' son Thomas E. Aikenhead started to serve a five year apprenticeship with Mrs. Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie. In 1891 Ridout, Aikenhead and Crombie sold their lease on the corner of King and Yonge Streets and moved to Adelaide Street East. In 1893 Thomas E. Aikenhead purchased the business and it became known as Aikenhead Hardware Co. In 1901 the business was reorganized as a limited stock company known as Aikenhead Hardware Limited. By 1930 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was situated on Temperance Street and had been there since 1905. By this point in time the business had six floors of merchandise and a warehouse for stock. It sold everything from tacks to tractors to cutlery and locks. In 1937 the company started to open branch stores in different communities in the Toronto area. They later expanded to the greater Toronto area and outside of it to such communities as Burlington, St. Catharines, Kitchener, Dundas, Markham and Sudbury. James T.E. Aikenhead, son of Thomas E. Aikenhead, joined the company in 1911 and took over from his father in 1944 as president. He died suddenly in 1948 and his brother J. Wilfred Aikenhead took over the presidency which he was still holding in 1969. In 1965 Aikenheads's purchased the hardware chain of Russell Hardware Company Limited and continued to expand. (Taken from: Histories on Aikenheads, Folder 2.) By 1996 Aikenhead Hardware Limited was known as Aikenheads Improvement Warehouse Inc. with its corporate office located on Ellesmere in Toronto and stores located in Scarborough, Markham, Woodbridge, Brampton and Oakville.

Alternatives

  • Corporate body

Alternatives was an environmental policy magazine published at Trent between 1971 and 1983. In 1983 the University of Waterloo took over the publication. At Trent University it was published quarterly by the students and faculty. The purpose of the magazine was to confront the implications the environmental crisis had for economic structures, living habits and political processes etc. At the same time, the magazine wanted to pose and confirm the questions by offering imaginative and serious solutions.

C.E. Smith Boots and Shoes

  • Corporate body

C.E. Smith Boots appears in the Farmers and Business Directory for the Counties of Durham, Northumberland, Ontario, Peterboro, and Victoria, 1890. It is listed under Ontario County in a town with a population of 275 called Zephyr. Clinton E. Smith Boots and Shoes later appears in Vernon's City of Peterborough (Ontario) Directory for 1926, and was located at 384 George Street, Peterborough. The company does not appear in the 1936 Directory, but rather lists Agnew's Shoes located at that address.

Early Canadian Life

  • Corporate body

"Early Canadian Life" was published 12 times a year in Oakville, Ontario. It was distributed nationally through a distributing company which was a subsidiary of MacLean-Hunter Ltd. It was published by Goldenglow Publications Ltd. and had a large readership throughout Canada.

Energy Savers Peterborough

  • Corporate body

The Energy Savers Peterborough (ESP) was established in May, 1982. It was founded to promote energy conservation in the City and County of Peterborough. ESP was a project that was considered one of-a-kind and was studied by the Ontario Ministry of Energy and Conservation as a way to make communities more energy efficient. It was started in the 1980's due to the wealth of information on energy conservation which was confusing people due to all the different sources and resources. The idea behind ESP was to sort the information out and give it to people at a local level and thereby increase community awareness of energy conservation. In their first year of operation ESP established a storefront in Peterborough Square, on the Corner of Water and Charlotte Streets, where they were able to give free non-partisan advice. They also offered successful workshops for arena and curling rink operators, energy saving seminars to churches, clinics for local media members and fleet operators on how to drive to save gas, a tire-check program and tours of solar-heated homes in the area. ESP helped the local Public Utilities Commission's (PUC) Residential Energy Advisory Program (REAP) establish conservation consciousness in the community. The ESP committee was chaired by Professor Peter Adams of Trent University.

Elizabethville School Accounts

  • Corporate body

Elizabethville is a small village in Hope Township, Ontario which is located between Garden Hill in Hope Township and Kendall in Clark Township.

Emily Township

  • Corporate body

Emily Township in Victoria County, previously Northumberland County in Newcastle District, was partially surveyed between October 18 and December 31, 1818 by Samuel Wilmot. The second part of the survey was completed by March 31, 1819. Emily Township is bounded by Verulam Township to the north, Ops and Manvers Townships to the east, Ennismore Township to the west, and Cavan Township to the south. It was described by Wilmot in a letter to the Suveyor General: "The quality of the land whereon there is maple, oak, elm and beech timber is exceedingly good, but the township is very much cut to pieces with swamps and a river that takes its rise in Manvers, presses diagonally through the township from the 2nd concession on that (west) boundary to the 12th concession on the east boundary, with immense marshes on each side." By the end of 1819, 44 settlers had been granted 100 acre half lots in the six concessions of Emily, between lots 8 and 23. By the end of 1820, the population had reached close to 100. The granting of lots tapered off between 1822 to 1824, and the first half of 1825. This occurred for two reasons: 1) the number of individuals coming to the district to seek land had decreased, and 2) the Land Board showed an interest in sending more newcomers into Smith, Otonabee, Ops and Mariposa Townships. Between 1822 and 1824 only 40 land grants were made in Emily. Even though migration into the township had decreased, the population continued grow. By 1825, the population had more than doubled to 216 inhabitants. From September to November of the same year, there was a large influx of Irish emigrants brought into Emily Township by Peter Robinson. In the following year, the population had increased to 837, three quarters of which were Robinson emigrants. The main source of livelihood for the settlers in Emily Township was agriculture. There were no mills in the Township until 1832, when William Cotnam built both grist and saw mills on his land beside the Pigeon River. Industry never really began and the township has remained mainly an agricultural area to the present day. (taken from Pammett, Howard. "Lilies and Shamrocks: A History of the Township of Emily in the County of Victoria". Lindsay: John Deyell Co., 1974.)

Camp Illahee

  • Corporate body

Camp Illahee was established in 1946 in Cobourg, Ontario. It began as a children's camp run by the Toronto Y.M.C.A. for diabetic children and later began catering to children with other diseases including heart and kidney conditions, haemophilia, and controlled epilepsy. The camp was later taken over by the Family Service Association of Metropolitan Toronto, an agency of the United Way. The name of the camp was changed to Illahee Northwoods Camp and its location was moved from Cobourg to Drag Lake in Haliburton, Ontario.

Camp Inawendawin

  • Corporate body

Camp Inawendawin was established in 1933 as a girls camp. It became a member of the Ontario Camping Association in 1954 and was operated by Mrs. Helena Anderson. The camp closed in 1964.

Camp Kawabi

  • Corporate body

Camp Kawabi is located 209 km north of Toronto on Big Hawk Lake, which is 32 km north of Minden, Ontario. The camp was a residential boys' camp, operating in the summer, for children between the ages of seven and fifteen.

Camp Pine Crest

  • Corporate body

Camp Pine Crest is a children's camp run by the Toronto YMCA. It was first opened in 1910, and moved to its current location in 1911. The first camp director was E.D. Otter. The camp is comprised of 650 acres (originally only 300 acres) and it is situated on the shores of Clear Lake, Gull Lake and Echo Lake, near Torrence in the Muskokas. Originally, Camp Pine Crest was established as a boys only camp, but in 1980 it became a co-ed camp.

Camp Richiladaca

  • Corporate body

Camp Richildaca was founded by William J. Babcock and Al Bathurst as a day camp in Kettleby, Ontario, in 1957. It grew to accommodate resident campers and was an outdoor education facility for various school boards. It was also a teacher training centre for the University of Toronto Faculty of Education and offered a heated pool, canoeing instruction, archery, snow-shoeing and tobogganing, as well as instruction in wildlife study, ornithology, insect ecology, forest ecology, survival skills, etc. Camp Richildaca was operated by the Babcock family until they sold it in 1989. William J. Babcock was head of the Physical Education Department of Richmond Hill High School and Chairman of the Richmond Hill Ontario Teachers' Federation Outdoor Education Committee. He wrote many articles pertaining to outdoor education.

Camp Robin Hood

  • Corporate body

Camp Robin Hood was established in 1946 at Sherwood Park in north Toronto. In approximately 1964, it moved to Markham, Ontario where Robin Hood Sports Academy was developed. In later years Camp Robin Hood acquired Camp Walden and Madawaska Camps. In addition to offering camping experiences, Camp Robin Hood offers school programs and provides facilities for corporate and private events.

Camp Tamarack

  • Corporate body

Camp Tamarack was established in 1922 as a Jewish Boy Scout's camp. The camp was situated on 350 acres of land in the Muskoka Lake District near Bracebridge, Ontario. The camp aimed to provide a camp setting where each boy counted. The boys were divided into small groups with two staff members to five boys. This allowed the boys to have individual attention instead of being part of a mass group of people. This Jewish Boy Scout Camp was owned by the Tamarack (59th) Association which was a member of the Ontario Camping Association. The camp was first located in the Lake of Bays area. The first Director was Mr. Edgar Reason, also first Scoutmaster of the 59th Scout Troop. In 1957, Stanley G. Wild was appointed Director. Activities at the camp included swimming, canoeing, water skiing and horseback riding as well as numerous other special events like baseball games, fishing, campouts, gymnastics and handicrafts. The campers lived in cabins while they were in the camp. In 1972 the camp closed.

Camp Tanamakoon

  • Corporate body

Camp Tanamakoon was established by Mary G. Hamilton, principal of Margaret Eaton School in Toronto, in 1925 and is located on Tanamakoon Lake in Algonquin Park. A summer camp for girls, Camp Tanamakoon offers an environmental education; activities include tripping, mountain biking, swimming, kayaking, canoeing, wood crafting, and various other activities. Owners of the Camp since its inception include: founder Mary G. Hamilton, 1925-1953; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Raymer, 1953-1974; Hugh and Carolea Butters, 1974-1984; and Kim and Marilyn Smith, 1984 to the present.

Camp X Historical Society

  • Corporate body

Camp X Historical Society is located in Whitby, Ontario, near the former site of Camp X. Camp X, which operated from 1941 to 1946, was a training camp responsible for training recruits for the Special Operations Executive of the British Security Coordination during World War II. It was comprised of two sections, the Special Training School No. 103, which trained allied agents in the techniques of secret warfare, and Hydra, a network which communicated messages between Canada, United States, and Great Britain. Camp X Historical Society was established to track down surviving SOE agents, and to document and catalogue their experiences. The Society is in the process of establishing a small museum on the original site of the Camp to house artifacts and memorabilia which document the operation.

Ontario Fire Insurance Plans, Campbellford

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Canada West and Canada. United Counties of Durham and Northumberland Census

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided into sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.) In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada in 19 counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada into 19 Counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.) The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterbourgh County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2,169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it was not until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.) Hastings County was proclaimed the 11th county of Upper Canada in 1792. The second largest county in Ontario, it includes nineteen municipal townships: Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Carlow, Dungannon, Elzevir and Grimsthorpe, Faraday, Hershal, Hungerford, Huntingdon, Limerick, Madoc, Marmora and Lake, Mayo; Monteagle, Rawdon, Sidney, Thurlow, Tudor and Cashel, Tyendinaga, and Wollaston. Hastings was named after a military leader who had fought in the American Revolution, Francis Rawdon-Hastings (1754-1826). His family name was taken from the town of Hastings in Sussex, England. Until 1849 Hastings County was called the Victoria District. This was changed at that time by the Baldwin Act which replaced district councils with county councils. The first major industry in Hastings County was agriculture, and this was well-established by 1860, with Belleville having the largest saw mills west of Ottawa. Around this time, mining became an important attraction for new settlers, with the extraction of gold at Eldorado, Deloro, Gilmour, and Cordova. Once the Grand Trunk Railway began making stops in Belleville in 1856, the economy of the county improved immensely. Today tourism, lumbering and mining are the major industries of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places on Ontario, Part II." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1981.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was inconsistent and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

Beavermead Park

  • Corporate body

Beavermead Park is located on the east shore of Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario, on land that was once owned by Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald.

Beaverton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Belleville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

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