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People, Organizations, and Families

Dr. Mary Louise Northway

  • Person

Dr. Mary Louise Northway, born in 1909, was the daughter of A. Garfield Northway and Mary McKellar and the granddaughter of John Northway, founder of the Northway Company Limited and John Northway and Son Limited. Mary was educated in Toronto and graduated from the University of Toronto, (B.A. 1933, M.A. 1934, and Ph.D. 1938). Mary did her graduate work at Cambridge University in England. Dr. Northway taught psychology at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1968, and the last fifteen years of her tenure were as Supervisor of Research at the Institute of Child Study. She also earned international recognition as a pioneer in the field of Sociometry. From 1950 to 1963, she was the president of the Northway Company Limited. Among the many honours bestowed upon Dr. Northway were: Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, Honorary Life Member of the Ontario Camping Association, and an Honorary Degree from Trent University in 1979. Throughout her life, Mary was involved in camping and she believed in the value of Canadian summer camping and tripping. She was the program director of Glen Bernard Camp from 1930 to 1939 and, with Flora Morrison, was co-director of a girls' camp called Windy Pine Point, from 1941 to 1950. Dr. Mary L. Northway died in 1987. In her will she left to Trent University its largest private benefaction to be known as the Northway Bequest in memory of her father, Garfield Northway. This bequest provided permanent support towards a number of areas: Trent University Archives, Bata Library and the Canadian Studies Department. (Information taken from a plaque commemorating the dedication of the Northway Reading Room which was written by the Trent University Archivist, Bernadine Dodge.)

Duncan Graham

  • Person

Duncan Graham was born October 5, 1845 in the Township of Mara, Ontario County, Canada West, to Archibald Graham and Ann McQuaig. He was the grandson of one of the early settlers, John or James Graham, natives of Scotland. He was a farmer and unmarried. He was also a Councillor, Deputy-Reeve and Reeve of Mara Township and Warden of the County of Ontario in 1896. He was elected to the House of Commons at the by-election of February 4, 1897. He was a Liberal-Independent. (Taken from: "The Parliamentary Guide, 1898-9." Winnipeg: Manitoba Free Press, 1898.)

Dunsford family

  • Family

The Dunsford family is connected through marriage to families associated with the early settlement of Peterborough and area, namely the Boyd, Langton, and Rubidge families.

Earl of Durham

  • Person

John George Lambton was born in Berkeley Square, London on April 12, 1792. He was the eldest son of William Henry Lambton, of Lambton, County of Durham, M.P. for the City of Durham and Lady Anne Barbara Frances Villiers, second daughter of George, fourth Earl of Jersey. He was educated at Eton. He inherited the family estate in 1797 and on June 8, 1809 was gazetted a cornet in the 10th Dragoons. He became a lieutenant in 1810 and retired from the position in 1811. In September of 1813 he was elected to the House of Commons and remained there until his elevation to peerage in 1828. He was created Baron Durham of the City of Durham and Lambton Castle by letters patent. In 1830 he was sworn a member of the privy council and he was appointed lord privy seal. This took place with the formation of the administration of Earl Grey who was the father of Durham's second wife. In 1832 Durham was appointed ambassador extraodinare to St. Petersburg, Berlin and Vienna. He returned to England a month later. In 1833 he resigned from all positions and was created Viscount Lambton and Earl of Durham. He was the first Earl of Durham. After this creation Durham became involved again in politics and once more he was appointed as ambassador extraorinare to St. Petersburg in 1835. He resigned in 1837 and was invested with the order of G.C.B. at Kensington Palace. In 1837 Durham was appointed high commissioner to Lower and Upper Canada in order to help resolve differences. He arrived at Quebec in May. In 1838 he resigned from this post and returned to England. He died July 28, 1840. (Taken from: "Dictionary of National Biography." Vol. XI. Great Britain: Oxford University Press, 1960.)

Early Canadian Life

  • Corporate body

"Early Canadian Life" was published 12 times a year in Oakville, Ontario. It was distributed nationally through a distributing company which was a subsidiary of MacLean-Hunter Ltd. It was published by Goldenglow Publications Ltd. and had a large readership throughout Canada.

Edith Fowke

  • Person

Edith Fulton Fowke was born on April 30, 1913 in Lumsden, Saskatchewan of Irish parents. She studied at the University of Saskatchewan, taking her B.A. in 1933 and her M.A. in 1938. In 1938 she married Frank Fowke. She was editor of Western Teacher from 1937-1944, and associate editor of Magazine Digest from 1945-1949. In 1957 she began collecting songs and producing recordings for Folkway Records of New York, as well as writing and editing books of folksongs and folktales. She joined the English Department at York University in 1971. She was awarded her LL.D. at Brock University in 1974, and her D. Litt at Trent in 1974, was made a Fellow of the American Folklore Society in 1975, and became a member of the Order of Canada in 1977.

Edna Barker

  • Person

Edna Barker was born in 1952 and was editor at CBC for Peter Gzowski for 20 years. She has edited two books relating to Gzowski, A Peter Gzowski Reader, and Remembering Peter Gzowski: A Book of Tributes.

Edward A. Partridge

  • Person

Edward A. Partridge (Ed) was born in 1862 at Barrie, Canada West, into a large family with 9 brothers and 4 sisters. Edward, at age 21, and one brother went west where they homesteaded in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan in 1883. In 1885 Edward taught school in Broadview, Saskatchewan and he participated in the Riel Rebellion of 1885 with the Yorkton Rangers. He was author of "A War On Poverty" and was the founder and first president of the United Grain Growers' of Saskatchewan in 1906. He was the "father" of the co-operative grain growers marketing system and of the Canadian Council of Agriculture. He was also the first editor of the Grain Growers Guide which was later named "The Country Guide". Partridge was honorary president of the United Farmers of Canada. He and his wife had five children: May (who died while swimming), Edna, Enid, Charles and Harold. Both sons died in France during World War I. In a binder accident Edward had to have one leg amputated which caused him to live in pain for the rest of his life. Shortly after his wife died he moved, with his youngest daughter, to Victoria in British Columbia. Edward A. Partridge died from a room filled with gas August 3, 1931 in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1962 a portrait of E.A. Partridge was unveiled at the the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto and to be housed later in the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame.

Edward C. Caddy

  • Person

Edward C. Caddy (1815-1897) was a land surveyor who learned his trade in Peterborough between 1839 and 1842. He was also a painter in the Trent Valley District. His landscapes were primarily in water colour.

Edward T. Brown

  • Person

Edward Templeton Brown, grandson to Frances and Thomas Stewart, was born at Goodwood, the family farm in Douro Township, Canada West, on December 24, 1852 to Edward Wilson Brown and Elizabeth Lydia Stewart. In 1879 he went to the Northwest Territory to help survey Riding Mountain National Park. After the survey was completed he worked for the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1880 he joined a party, led by Major Boulton, heading for the Shell River area of western Manitoba to settle on land. He joined Boulton's Scouts and during the Battle of Batoche was killed in action on May 12, 1885. The community in Peterborough decided to raise a memorial stone to Edward Brown to commemorate his death in the Riel Uprising.

Edwin C. Guillet

  • Person

Dr. Edwin C. Guillet, historian, was born at Cobourg, Ontario, September 29, 1898, and educated at the University of Toronto (B.A. 1922) and at McMaster University (B.A. 1926; M.A. 1927). He joined the staff of Lindsay Collegiate in 1923 and the Central Technical School in Toronto in 1926, remaining until 1934. From 1958 to 1962 he served as research historian with the Ontario Department of Public Records and Archives. In 1963 he was appointed consultant on Canadiana to the Library of Trent University. Dr. Guillet also wrote many books including "Early Life in Upper Canada" (1933), "The Great Migration" (1937), "Life Insurance without Exploitation" (1946), and "Pioneer Inns and Taverns" (1954-56). (taken from "The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography, fourth edition." 1978.)

Edwin Victor McNeill

  • Person

Edwin Victor McNeill was born in Arran Township, Bruce County, in 1896. He belonged to the 3rd Canadian Company of Royal Engineers during World War 1. He became involved in Ontario Public Service by joining the Ontario Provincial Police at an early age and advancing to Commissioner in 1953. (Taken from: The Canadian Who's Who, 1952-1954. Vol VI. Toronto: Trans-Canada Press, 1954.)

Edwin Zimmerman Yerex

  • Person

Edwin Zimmerman Yerex (1856-1926) was born on September 23, 1856 , in Port Hoover, Victoria County. He lived in Little Britain, Ontario with his wife, Mary Henrietta Ashton (Ettie, 1866-1953). They had two sons, Orville (1884-1916; married in 1904 to Beatrice (1888-1962); had 3 children – Mary, b. 1904, Walter, b. 1907, and Helen, b. 1908) and Elba (1885-1951); married to Ida Webster (1890-1889); had 2 children, Clifford and Marion (1916-1979). Photograph of Elba and his family is courtesy of Joan McKenzie, Elba's grandaughter. Marion Yerex was her mother). E. Z. Y.’s parents were Henry Travis Yerex (d. 18 Nov. 1914 ) and Mary Ann Hoover (d. 11 March 1902 ). Henry Yerex owned and operated a small store in Little Britain in the 1860s. Edwin Yerex ran a larger operation also in Little Britain. He was active in the business, social, and church life of Little Britain and was a village trustee in 1905. He owned a summer home at Port Hoover and often hosted social and church events there. Yerex died on August 17th, 1926 . He seems to have been a notary public and his home was used as a surgery and nursing home. He was also postmaster with the post office located in his store.

Egerton Brown

  • Person

Egerton Brown was the son of Newton H. Brown and Grace Amanda Young. His siblings include Elizabeth, Robert, Harcourt, and Quentin, and his wife's name was Hazel. Brown attended the University of Toronto in the 1920's and was involved in the U.C. Literary and Athletic Society. He was made a corporal in the Queen's Own Rifle in 1926 and became Captain in command of Head Quarters Company in the 4th Battalion of the Regiment. In 1939-1940, Brown was a volunteer fireman and policeman in the City of Westmount, and in 1940, joined the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment of Canada) as a second lieutenant based on Varsity COTC and Queens Own Rifle Training. Brown became President of the Montreal Chapter of the National Office Management Association and was an administrator with Sun Life. In his own words, from 1939-1945 while at Sun Life, he was "in charge of world-wide office staff and administration." (Taken from The Army's Mister Brown: A Family Trilogy, 1941-1952 / edited by Harcourt Brown, 1982)

Elaine Goselin

  • Person

Elaine Goselin (1941- ) was born in Trenton Ontario. She moved to Peterborough in 1959 and trained as a nurse at Peterborough Civic Hospital. Graduating in 1962, she worked in Obstetrics in the newborn nursery until 1992. She has been active in volunteer work and, as a founding member of Arbor Theatre, served as Archivist. Ms. Goselin is a member of the Peterborough Historical Society, the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario, Peterborough Theatre Guild, Canadian Canoe Museum, Probus, Women's Art Association, Art Gallery of Peterborough and MUSE film series.

Elgie E.M. Joblin

  • Person

Elgie Ellingham Miller Joblin was born April 6, 1909 in Toronto to Flora Gertrude Elgie, of Toronto, and Frederick George Joblin, of the Isle of Wight in England. Elgie married Helen Majorie Smith of Rawdon Township on October 21, 1936. He studied at Victoria College, Emmanuel College and the University of Toronto. His M.A. thesis was entitled, "The Education of the Indians of Western Ontario". He was ordained as a United Church minister in 1936. He served the Aboriginal Peoples of Ontario as a student and minister in South Caradoc from 1936 to 1944. He taught and supervised the residential school at Muncey, Ontario from 1946 to 1957. He was the Assistant and later the Associate Secretary for Home Missions from 1957 to 1971. He served at Coboconk, Ontario, until his retirement from the ministry. He died in 1993.

Elias Rendell

  • Person

Elias Rendell, son of John Rendell and brother of John Rendell, was born in ca. 1797 and lived in Shaldon, County of Devon, England. Rendell was 15 years old at the time that the apprenticeship agreement was signed.

Eliza Jane (Hughes) McAlpine

  • Person

Eliza Jane (Hughes) McAlpine was born in 1854 in Durham County, the daughter of Irish immigrant parents, John and Caroline Hughes. She married John McAlpine, a doctor, in 1876, and was the sister of Sir Sam Hughes. Eliza died in Lindsay in 1938.

Elizabeth (Betsy) Struthers

  • Person

Betsy (Elizabeth Jane) Porter was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1951. She received her BA in English in 1972 from Waterloo Lutheran University (which included one year at the University of Toronto on a Letter of Permission). She married James E. Struthers in 1971; they moved to Peterborough in 1977. She became involved in the literary life of the community as a committee member for the Peterborough County Board of Education Poetry Festival, 1985-1991, and especially as the founder in 1987 and first administrator of the Writers Reading Series at Trent University. She organized and hosted Poetry Month readings at various locations in Peterborough throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. Since 1991, she has been a member of the informal Peterborough Women Writers’ Group, which presented a series of talks at the Peterborough Public Library in the winter of 1999-2000. She has also taught poetry workshops in many local schools, at Trent University and Fleming College. After serving as Chair of the Education Committee of the League of Canadian Poets, in which role she co-edited an anthology of essays on teaching poetry, and of the Feminist Caucus, she was President of the League from 1995 to 1997. Since the publication of her first collection of poetry in 1984, she has published nine books of poetry – Still won the 2004 Pat Lowther Award – three novels and a book of short fiction and has conducted workshops and read her work in cities and towns across Canada from Labrador to Victoria. A freelance editor of academic texts, she has worked for Peterborough-based Broadview Press since 1988 as well as other publishers, journals and individuals in Canada and the United States.

Elizabethville School Accounts

  • Corporate body

Elizabethville is a small village in Hope Township, Ontario which is located between Garden Hill in Hope Township and Kendall in Clark Township.

Emily Township

  • Corporate body

Emily Township in Victoria County, previously Northumberland County in Newcastle District, was partially surveyed between October 18 and December 31, 1818 by Samuel Wilmot. The second part of the survey was completed by March 31, 1819. Emily Township is bounded by Verulam Township to the north, Ops and Manvers Townships to the east, Ennismore Township to the west, and Cavan Township to the south. It was described by Wilmot in a letter to the Suveyor General: "The quality of the land whereon there is maple, oak, elm and beech timber is exceedingly good, but the township is very much cut to pieces with swamps and a river that takes its rise in Manvers, presses diagonally through the township from the 2nd concession on that (west) boundary to the 12th concession on the east boundary, with immense marshes on each side." By the end of 1819, 44 settlers had been granted 100 acre half lots in the six concessions of Emily, between lots 8 and 23. By the end of 1820, the population had reached close to 100. The granting of lots tapered off between 1822 to 1824, and the first half of 1825. This occurred for two reasons: 1) the number of individuals coming to the district to seek land had decreased, and 2) the Land Board showed an interest in sending more newcomers into Smith, Otonabee, Ops and Mariposa Townships. Between 1822 and 1824 only 40 land grants were made in Emily. Even though migration into the township had decreased, the population continued grow. By 1825, the population had more than doubled to 216 inhabitants. From September to November of the same year, there was a large influx of Irish emigrants brought into Emily Township by Peter Robinson. In the following year, the population had increased to 837, three quarters of which were Robinson emigrants. The main source of livelihood for the settlers in Emily Township was agriculture. There were no mills in the Township until 1832, when William Cotnam built both grist and saw mills on his land beside the Pigeon River. Industry never really began and the township has remained mainly an agricultural area to the present day. (taken from Pammett, Howard. "Lilies and Shamrocks: A History of the Township of Emily in the County of Victoria". Lindsay: John Deyell Co., 1974.)

Emmett F. Sheehy

  • Person

Emmett F. Sheehy was a Barrister-at-law in Peterborough, Ontario during the 1930's.

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