Showing 900 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Canada. Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Records. Red Series

  • Corporate body

Library and Archives Canada holds these records as R.G. 10 which is the Department of Indian Affairs from 1677-1978 and contains 1750.6 m of textual and graphic material.(See also General Guide Series 1983, Federal Archives Division in the Trent University Archives Reading Room.)

Canada. Indian Affairs. Deputy Superintendant Generals' letter books

  • Corporate body

On March 17, 1862 the position of Deputy Superintendent General of Indian Affairs was created and William Spragge was appointed to this postion. At Confederation, control of Indian matters was given to the federal government and this responsibilty was delegated to the Department of Secretary of State for the Provinces. The Secretary of State became Superintendent General of Indian Affairs. In 1873 the Department of the Interior was created and an Indians and Indian Lands Branch was set up within it. As a result, the Minister of the Interior became the Superintendent General. The following year, L. Vankoughnet was appointed Deputy Superintendent General. In 1876 the Indian Act was passed which consolidated and revised all previous legislation dealing with Indians in all existing Provinces and Territories. Four years later, in 1880, the Independent Department of Indian Affairs was set up. However, the Minister of the Interior remained Superintendent General of Indian Affairs. In 1893, Hayter Reed was appointed Deputy Superintendent General and remained in this position until 1897 when James A. Smart, Deputy Minister of the Interior, took over the position. In 1902, Francis Pedley was appointed Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs thus ending the system where bythe Deputy of the Interior held that post. Under Pedley, the departmental structure of Indian Affairs was restructured. Several distinct branches were set up to reflect the expansion of the Department's activities. These were the Secretaries Branch, the Accountant's Branch, the Land and Timber Branch, the Survey Branch, and the School Branch. In 1913, Duncan Campbell Scott was appointed as Deputy Superindendent of Indian Affairs, a position which he retained until 1932. The Department continued to exist until 1936 when it was made a branch of the Department of Mines and Resources.(Taken from: "Public Records Division, General InventorySeries : No. 1 Records relating to Indian Affairs (RG 10)."Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1975.)

Canada. Indian Affairs. Deputy Superintendant Generals' letter books

  • Corporate body

On March 17, 1862 the position of Deputy Superintendent General of Indian Affairs was created and William Spragge was appointed to this postion. At Confederation, control of Indian matters was given to the federal government and this responsibilty was delegated to the Department of Secretary of State for the Provinces. The Secretary of State became Superintendent General of Indian Affairs. In 1873 the Department of the Interior was created and an Indians and Indian Lands Branch was set up within it. As a result, the Minister of the Interior became the Superintendent General. The following year, L. Vankoughnet was appointed Deputy Superintendent General. In 1876 the Indian Act was passed which consolidated and revised all previous legislation dealing with Indians in all existing Provinces and Territories. Four years later, in 1880, the Independent Department of Indian Affairs was set up. However, the Minister of the Interior remained Superintendent General of Indian Affairs. In 1893, Hayter Reed was appointed Deputy Superintendent General and remained in this position until 1897 when James A. Smart, Deputy Minister of the Interior, took over the position. In 1902, Francis Pedley was appointed Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs thus ending the system where bythe Deputy of the Interior held that post. Under Pedley, the departmental structure of Indian Affairs was restructured. Several distinct branches were set up to reflect the expansion of the Department's activities. These were the Secretaries Branch, the Accountant's Branch, the Land and Timber Branch, the Survey Branch, and the School Branch. In 1913, Duncan Campbell Scott was appointed as Deputy Superindendent of Indian Affairs, a position which he retained until 1932. The Department continued to exist until 1936 when it was made a branch of the Department of Mines and Resources.(Taken from: "Public Records Division, General InventorySeries : No. 1 Records relating to Indian Affairs (RG 10)."Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1975.)

Canada. Peterborough County Census.

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterborough County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Canada. Victoria County and Durham (East) County Census.

  • Corporate body

Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2 169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it wasn't until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.)

Canada West and Canada. United Counties of Durham and Northumberland Census

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided into sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.) In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada in 19 counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.)

Canada West. Peterborough County Census.

  • Corporate body

The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterborough County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.)

Canada West. Victoria County Census.

  • Corporate body

Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2 169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it wasn't until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.)

Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples

  • Corporate body

The Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples is an association of natives and non-natives in support of natives. It was originally established in 1957 under the name of the National Commission on the Indian Canadian and was a non-native organization created to study the "Indian problem". The first chairman of the Commission was Mrs. W.H. Clark. By February 1958 it had become apparent that the problems of the native peoples were much more complex than first anticipated, and it was decided to involve aboriginal peoples in the Commission to help find viable solutions. In 1960, the Indian-Eskimo Association was incorporated, with Mrs. Clark as the first president. The I.E.A. had several functions which included encouraging native leaders to form organizations, fund-raising, organizing workshops to discuss native housing, community and economic development, and providing advice and support in legal matters. Also, provincial and regional divisions were created to help deal with specific native issues, not just native problems on a general level. By 1968, several national and provincial native organizations had been organized. In September of the same year, leaders of the native organizations met with representatives of the I.E.A. to discuss the future role of the Association. It was agreed that the native organizations still needed the I.E.A.'s support, but that they should begin to deal directly with governments, without the I.E.A. acting as the middleman. It was clear that the future of the I.E.A. was to provide only support and advice to the developing native organizations. In 1972, many of the recommendations made in 1968 had come into effect. The name was changed to the Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples to reflect the new functions of the Association more accurately. At this time, regional offices of the Association were closed, and the head office moved from Toronto to Ottawa. The Association dissolved in 2015.

Canadian Camping Association

  • Corporate body

The first meeting of the Canadian Camping Association was held on May 20, 1936 at the Central Y.M.C.A., Toronto. At this meeting the Association was formally created, a constitution was adopted, officers were named, and steps were taken to begin the nomination process for a board of directors. The first officers of the Association were Mr. Taylor Statten, president; Miss Mary Edgar, vice-president; Dr. George S. Patterson, secretary; and Miss Mary C. Donaldson, treasurer. At the time, the primary objective of the Canadian Camping Association was to "further the interests and welfare of children, youths and adults through camping as an educative, recreative, and character developing experience." Over the years this primary goal has remained the focus of the Association with the addition of several other goals. These are: "to present the image of organized camping on a national level; to administer national camping affairs and to act as a liason between provincial camping associations; to encourage the development of high standards in camping; and to develop and promote research, training programs and conferences on a national level". The Canadian Camping Association continues to promote camping in Canada.

Canadian Camping Association : F.M. Van Wagner

  • Corporate body

The first meeting of the Canadian Camping Association was held on May 20, 1936 at the Central Y.M.C.A., Toronto. At this meeting the Association was formally created, a constitution was adopted, officers were named, and steps were taken to begin the nomination process for a board of directors. The first officers of the Association were Taylor Statten, president; Mary Edgar, vice-president; Dr. George S. Patterson, secretary; and Mary C. Donaldson, treasurer. At the time, the primary objective of the Canadian Camping Association was to "further the interests and welfare of children, youths and adults through camping as an educative, recreative, and character developing experience." Over the years this primary goal has remained the focus of the Association with the addition of several other goals. These are: "to present the image of organized camping on a national level; to administer national camping affairs and to act as a liason between provincial camping associations; to encourage the development of high standards in camping; and to develop and promote research, training programs and conferences on a national level". The Canadian Camping Association continues to promote camping in Canada.

Canadian Copying House

  • Corporate body

The Canadian Copying House was operated by Ford & Coleman, Ameliasburgh, Ontario. The general office was located in Belleville, Ontario.

Canadian Federation University Women's Club of Peterborough

  • Corporate body

The University Women's Club of Peterborough adopted a new name on 26 February 1991 and became the Canadian Federation of University Women Peterborough Club. At that time they adopted a new constitution. The University Women's Club of Peterborough was founded in March 1937 as a member club of the Canadian Federation of University Women. The International Federation of University Women was founded in Europe in the Spring of 1919. On their return to Canada, delegates to that meeting from University Women's Clubs in Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Winnipeg and other Canadian cities met again in August 1919 to create the Canadian Federation of University Women, with Mrs. Margaret Stovel McWilliams of the Winnipeg Club as President. The Canadian organization's aims were to promote the highest standards of education at all levels, to encourage participation in public affairs in the political, economical and cultural fields, and to safeguard and improve the economic, legal and professional status of women in Canada and the World. The International Federation of University Women aims to promote understanding among women of different cultures. There are Member Federations of the IFUW throughout the world and member Clubs of CFUW in all parts of Canada.

Canadian Forum

  • Corporate body

Founded in 1920 by a group of University of Toronto faculty members, Canadian Forum first began publication in October of that year. With particular emphasis on Canadian art and poetry, Canadian Forum provides a medium for public opinion on art, literature, politics, theology and science.

Canadian Horticulturalist and Beekeeper

  • Corporate body

The Canadian Horticulturalist and Beekeeper was a periodical published by the Horticultural Publishing Company in Peterborough, Ontario. The Canadian Horticulturalist was published as early as 1881. In May of 1913 the title was changed to The Canadian Horticulturalist and Beekeeper after the Canadian Bee Journal was purchased and incorporated into the Canadian Horticulturalist. These periodicals were the official publications for the Canadian Horticultural Societies and the Ontario Bee Keeper's Associations. In 1914 it became the official publication for the New Brunswick Bee Keeper's Association. At a later date the periodical appeared to come out in three different editions--the Floral Edition, the Fruit Edition and the Beekeeping Edition--which were inserted into special sections into the "Horticulturalist". It was published once a month. The managing director was H. Bronson Cowan. In 1918 A.B.A. Cutting B.S.A. was described as a former editor and in 1921 an W.A.W. was editor. In 1918 there were two co-editors who seemed to have a little bit of difficulty getting the magazine out to its subscribers since the co-editors were in France during World War I. The magazine contained articles and illustrations pertinent to horticulture and beekeeping. It also contained advertisements for nurseries, suppliers, greenhouses, farm machinery and tools. In the later issues there were advertisements for cars.

Canadian Images

  • Corporate body

Organized at Trent University, Canadian Images was developed as a film festival after the visit of Gerry Pratley of the Ontario Film Institute to a fourth year Trent seminar. 1978 was the first year the festival took place and every single screen at Trent was used and some screens at the commercial film theatres in the City of Peterborough were used as well. Artists such as Budge Crawley, Michael Snow and Joyce Weiland attended in the first year. Films, displays and seminars were held throughout the festival. Trent students helped visitors and delegates to the festival. Orm Mitchell and John Wadland were the force behind the first festival of which 8 500 people attended. In the next two years 20 000 people came from all over Canada to view the work of Canadian artists. In its fourth year a board of directors was established with Susan Ditta, a Trent graduate, as the Executive Director. Unfortunately Canadian Images started to operate under a deficit and after the unlawful screening of the uncut "A Message From Our Sponsor" the festival went downhill. The screening of "A Message From Our Sponsor" resulted in a court case between the Ontario Film Censorship Board, acting under the Ontario Theatres Act, and Susan Ditta and Ian McLachlan, festival chairman and English professor. They were found guilty after considerable expense to the University. In 1985 the Festival was shut down. (Taken from: Cole, A.O.C. "Trent the Making of a University, 1957-1987." 1992.)

Canadian Land and Emigration Company

  • Corporate body

In 1859, the Crown Lands Department in Canada advertised a block of land for sale in the District of Haliburton. The purpose for the sale of the land was to promote rapid settlement of the newly created townships in the District through private enterprise. The townships included in the sale were Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Gilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre, Clyde, and Langford. In 1861, the land was purchased by a group of English gentlemen, headed by the Honourable Mr. Justice T.C. Haliburton, and the Canada Land and Emigration Company Limited was formed under the laws of Great Britain in 1862. The purpose of the Company was to sell land to settlers, and in return, the Company built roads, conducted surveys, and built saw and grist mills. From 1863 to 1870, a large number of emigrants came to settle in the region. In 1869, Messrs. Boyd, Smith & Company, lumbermen from Port Hope, obtained the timber rights on the Company's lands in the townships of Dudley, Gilford, and Havelock. The lumber business caused an economic boom in the region. By 1871, the Company had sold 16,650 acres to settlers and a number of town lots to various purchasers. In 1872, the Company built a road between the villages of Kenneway and Haliburton. Also, the Company contributed greatly to the cost of the connection of a telegraph line to Haliburton. In 1877, the Company contributed to the construction of the Victoria Railroad Company line from Kinmount to Haliburton with the hopes of increasing settlement in the Townships. This did not happen. By 1883, the Province of Ontario had begun to open up neighbouring townships with offers of free land grants. The Company was unable to cope with this competition. As a result, the Company decided to offer for sale its complete holdings and undertakings in Canada. The Company was purchased by W.H. Lockhart Gordon and James Irwin on April 11, 1883. It should be noted that Mr. Irwin had previously been involved in lumbering in the area, beginning in 1877, and had entered into partnership with Mr. Boyd, who was already involved in the timber industry at that time. On April 10, 1889, Letters of Patent were issued by the Province of Ontario incorporating the new Canadian Land and Immigration Company of Haliburton Limited. From 1890 to 1897 little activity took place. Sales of land and timber cutting right had practically ceased. In 1895, Mr. Irwin declared bankrupcty and the bank (most likely the Canadian Bank of Commerce) took possesion of his rights and interest in Haliburton, which included Irwin's shares in the new Company. During the 1920's the Company sold the entire township of Bruton to the Ontario Hydro-Electric Commission and proceeds from the sale allowed the Company to buy back from the bank the timber cutting rights previously licensed to Irwin. During the depression, lumbering activities ceased once again, but as more roads were constructed, the region began to develop as a tourist and vacation area, and land sales began to increase. At the outbreak of World War II, lumbering activities intensified, and carried on into the post-war years. By the end of 1946, all of the land originally purchased by the Company had been sold. The Canadian Land and Immigration wound up its affairs, surrendered its charter, and ceased to exist. (Taken from a history of the Canandian Land and Emigration Co. Limited located in 77-024/14/12, and Cummings, H.R. "Early Days in Haliburton." Ontario: Department of Lands and Forests, 1963.)

Canadian Red Cross

  • Corporate body

The Canadian Red Cross was established by Surgeon-Major George Sterling Ryerson. He participated in the North-West Rebellion of 1885 and used a red cross to protect his horse-drawn ambulance. The Red Cross Society was founded by Henri Dunant in Geneva, Switzerland in an effort to gain neutral status for medical personnel during war time in order to help the wounded. The Society spread throughout the world and it was formally established in Canada by Major Ryerson in 1896. In 1909 the Canadian Red Cross was incorporated by the federal government. It has been active in setting up outpost hospitals in remote parts of the country. It offers a wide range of services in addition to the national blood transfusion service. (Taken from: "The Canadian Encyclopedia." Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Cape Croker Indian Reserve

  • Corporate body

Cape Croker Indian Reserve is located near Georgian Bay on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. The town of Cape Croker is a native reserve and is home to the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation. The Chippewas of Nawash refer to themselves as Anishnabe. Artifactual evidence suggests that aboriginal people have used the area of Cape Croker for over 2000 years, and oral history records that the waters around Cape Croker were a healing and burial site for Ojibwa from a much larger area. The Chippewas surrendered most of their lands in the treaty of 1857 with the promise from the Canadian government that their sacred burial grounds would be protected. In 2000, the bands of Saugeen and Nawash signed a fishing agreement with the Ontario government which allowed them to fish commercially in the Cape Croker area.

Captain Thomas Gummersall Anderson

  • Person

Captain Thomas Gummersall Anderson, Superintendent of Indian Affairs (1830-1845), was born at Sorel, Quebec, on November 12, 1779, the son of Captain Samuel Anderson, of the Royal Regiment of New York. His first wife was Mar-pi-ya-ro-to-win (Grey Cloud), a descendent of Sioux Chief Wahpasha, and they had three children; his second wife was Elizabeth Ann Hamilton (1796-1858). After serving an apprenticeship with a merchant at Kingston, Upper Canada, he went into the fur trade at Michilimackinac; and in 1814 was in command of a party of volunteers that re-took Prairie-du Chien from the Americans. After the War he was appointed as an officer of the Indian Department, with the rank of Captain. He was stationed in turn at Drummond Island, Penetanguishene, Coldwater, and Manitoulin Island. In 1845 he succeeded Colonel S.P. Jarvis as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Canada West; and he held this post until his retirement in 1858. He died at Port Hope on February 10, 1875.

Carrie Brady

  • Person

Carrie Brady was a student taught by the Sisters of Loretto in Lindsay, Ontario. The school building later became the first Motherhouse of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peterborough. The Loretto Convent was built in 1874 but burnt down in 1884. (Taken from: Lindsay, Past and Present, Souvenir of Old Home Week")

Carrying Place

  • Corporate body

Carrying Place is a narrow isthmus separating Weller's Bay and the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario. Carrying Place also connects Prince Edward County to the mainland. It is located 5 miles south of Trenton. Carrying Place was so named due to its location. It is situated at a point where the Indians and early settlers travelling by water had to portage to get from the Bay of Quinte to Lake Ontario. One of the first people to settle permanently in Carrying Place was Asa Weller in 1783. Robert Young, believed to the the second settler, received a land grant in 1792. Two other prominent families who helped to settle Carrying Place were the Wilkins and the Biggars. Some of these founding families' descendants still live in Carrying Place today. The first Church, St. John's Anglican, was built in 1811, and the first schoolhouse was opened in 1852. Unfortunately, Carrying Place never became the big city as was envisioned by the founding fathers.

Castleton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad.

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

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