Showing 903 results

People, Organizations, and Families

British Parliament

  • Corporate body

The Stuart dynasty began in Britain with the reign of James I (James VI of Scotland) in 1603. His reign was marked by the Gunpowder Plot, a new translation of the bible, the rise of Puritanism and increasing hostility between monarch and Parliament as the latter increased under the influence of barons and an increasingly powerful merchant class. James I died in 1625. (See, for example, Victor Slater. The Political History of Tudor and Stuart England. N.Y.: Routledge, 2002).

Bruce Hodgins

  • Person
  • 1931-2019

Bruce Hodgins was born in 1931. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Western Ontario; his Master's degree from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and his Doctoral degree from Duke University in North Carolina. Before he became a professor at Trent University he was a history professor for 3 years at the University of Western Ontario. He taught at Prince of Wales College at Charlottetown on Prince Edward Island. While he was in Charlottetown he met Carol, his future wife. By 1963 they had two sons. In 1965 he joined the faculty of Trent University and he taught Canadian Politics. From January to June of 1979 he was an Acting College Head. From 1980 to 1984 he was the Department and Program Head of History and from 1986 to 1992, and 1995, he was Director of the Leslie M. Frost Centre. Bruce's parents established the Wanapitei Wilderness Camp on Temagami. He became the camp's director in 1971 and played a major role in running and developing it. Bruce is an active member in a canoeing organization in Peterborough that also includes other members of the Trent and Wanapitei communities.

Bruce LeCouffe

  • Person

Bruce LeCouffe is the great grandson of Walter J. Francis, engineer and bridge builder. Francis worked together on the construction of the Peterborough Lift Lock with Richard Birdsall Rogers. During that time, Francis was field supervisor and was responsible for the superstructure drawings.

Bruce Mickleburgh

  • Person

Bruce Mickleburgh was a teacher, journalist and social activist interested in the peace movement, socialism and Marxism. He was Dean of English at Seneca College and founder of the educational publication, Monday Morning.

Buck family

  • Person

The Buck family genealogy was compiled by Louise Buck, wife of Edwin D. Buck of Norwood, Ontario. From curiosity she researched and produced a book on the Buck family in Canada from the first ancestor to descendants. The book begins with a brief history of England then Yorkshire, Dent and its surroundings. Louise then writes about the English ancestors, immigration to Canada and gives a short history of Upper Canada and then Norwood. Included in the book are genealogical charts, abbreviations and codes, variations in the spelling of names, relationship charts, family charts and connected families. The book was privately produced in 1987.

Buckhorn Wilderness Centre

  • Corporate body

The Buckhorn Wilderness Centre, established in 1966, was a non-profit corporation dedicated to the preservation of typical Canadian wilderness for the education and cultural enrichment of future generations. In 1971 responsibility for the Centre was transferred to the Otonabee Region Conservation Authority.

Burgess-Walton family

  • Family

Joseph Walton (1772-1826) was the first settler of the Walton family to settle in Smith Township, Peterborough County in 1819. He married Hannah Stuart (1772-1861) and they had seven children: John (1797-1881), Nancy, Joseph (1913-1900), William (1814-), Matthew (1817-1902), Jacob (1820-1865) and Robert (1823-1904). The family farmed in Smith Township and eventually spread out across Canada and the United States. Verna Burgess is the granddaughter of Joseph Walton who married Sarah Jane Chalmers (1821-1875). Their daughter Emma (1861-1946) married Dr. Francis John Burgess (1861-1945), a general practitioner and pharmacist in Lakefield, Ontario, and they had four daughters: Lelia, Verna, Doris, and Helen. Verna became a high school Department Head and she sat on the committee (as representative of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation) to examine the need to have a non-sectarian degree-granting college, which would eventually become Trent University.

Bury's Green Women's Institute

  • Person

Bury's Green Women's Institute of East Victoria District was founded in 1953. A branch member of the larger world-wide Women's Institutes organization, Bury's Green Women's Institute's focus was to strive "for all that is best "For Home and Country"". Activities in the community included raising money by means of card parties, bazaars, making and selling quilts, and entering local fairs. The Women's Institute donated money and food to the County Home, widows in Korea, and shut-ins at Christmas. The local 4-H Club came under the jurisdiction of the Women's Institute and was sponsored by it. The Institute disbanded in 2000. (Taken from the Tweedsmuir History)

C. Beale

  • Person

C. Beale was a retired military officer who settled in the Peterborough area at the end of the 1830s.

Caldwell family

  • Family

Hugh Caldwell Sr. (1824-1903) emigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1843 to the Waterloo area with his father and siblings. He married Ann Nancy MacDonald (1832-1903) in 1855 and settled in Mornington Township, Perth County. In January 1867, he sold his farm and tenant farmed near Strathroy, Ontario for some months before purchasing Lots 16 and 17, Concession 13 in Chandos Township, Peterborough County where he settled in December of that year. In 1875, he was appointed to the position of property assessor for Chandos, Anstruther, and Burleigh townships and held this position at various times until 1890. He opened the first post office in the Clydesdale Settlement of Chandos Township in his house; His son, Hugh Caldwell Jr. [1861-1914] lived part of his adult life in the Emo, Ontario area. Hugh Caldwell Sr. was the great-great grandfather of Leonard Caldwell and his siblings. Hugh Caldwell Jr. was a great uncle.

Cameron Family

  • Family

Charles Cameron was born July 29, 1830 at Lossiemouth, Scotland. In 1856 he emigrated to Canada West and opened a business in the town of Peterborough. Three years later, Sophia Barron, also of Lossiemouth, followed Charles Cameron to Canada West, and they were married at Kingston, February 22, 1859. Together they raised four children: Annie Walker, b. 1859; Alfred and Albert, twins, b. 1864, and Sophia, b. 1868. Two other children, Clara, b. 1861 and William, b. 1866, died in infancy. In 1860, Cameron formed a business partnership with Donald McKellar, and as the firm of McKellar and Cameron, they opened a general store at the corner of George and Hunter Streets, Peterborough. They sold groceries and hardware, and acted as commission merchants. On December 8, 1869, the store was destroyed by fire. In 1869, Sophia and the three youngest children went on a visit to Scotland. Charles and Annie later joined them for Christmas in the same year. In the new year Charles returned to Peterborough and became an insurance and steamboat ticket agent. He continued in this line of work until 1903. He died a year later on February 25, 1904. His wife Sophia never returned to Peterborough; she died in Elgin, Scotland, April 29, 1873. It is unknown as to when the children returned to Canada. Albert Cameron went into a curtain and draperies business called Rumsey and Cameron. His twin brother Alfred became a Provincial Land Surveyor. Alfred married Jennie Rose on November 2, 1895 and together they had 8 children. Their first born died at the age of two. Three of their daughters, Jessie, Margaret and Jean remained in Peterborough throughout their lives, and they are responsible for the donation of this fonds to the Trent University Archives. The Cameron home on Chemong Road was dedicated as a women's shelter in 1996.

Camp Illahee

  • Corporate body

Camp Illahee was established in 1946 in Cobourg, Ontario. It began as a children's camp run by the Toronto Y.M.C.A. for diabetic children and later began catering to children with other diseases including heart and kidney conditions, haemophilia, and controlled epilepsy. The camp was later taken over by the Family Service Association of Metropolitan Toronto, an agency of the United Way. The name of the camp was changed to Illahee Northwoods Camp and its location was moved from Cobourg to Drag Lake in Haliburton, Ontario.

Camp Inawendawin

  • Corporate body

Camp Inawendawin was established in 1933 as a girls camp. It became a member of the Ontario Camping Association in 1954 and was operated by Mrs. Helena Anderson. The camp closed in 1964.

Camp Kawabi

  • Corporate body

Camp Kawabi is located 209 km north of Toronto on Big Hawk Lake, which is 32 km north of Minden, Ontario. The camp was a residential boys' camp, operating in the summer, for children between the ages of seven and fifteen.

Camp Pine Crest

  • Corporate body

Camp Pine Crest is a children's camp run by the Toronto YMCA. It was first opened in 1910, and moved to its current location in 1911. The first camp director was E.D. Otter. The camp is comprised of 650 acres (originally only 300 acres) and it is situated on the shores of Clear Lake, Gull Lake and Echo Lake, near Torrence in the Muskokas. Originally, Camp Pine Crest was established as a boys only camp, but in 1980 it became a co-ed camp.

Camp Richiladaca

  • Corporate body

Camp Richildaca was founded by William J. Babcock and Al Bathurst as a day camp in Kettleby, Ontario, in 1957. It grew to accommodate resident campers and was an outdoor education facility for various school boards. It was also a teacher training centre for the University of Toronto Faculty of Education and offered a heated pool, canoeing instruction, archery, snow-shoeing and tobogganing, as well as instruction in wildlife study, ornithology, insect ecology, forest ecology, survival skills, etc. Camp Richildaca was operated by the Babcock family until they sold it in 1989. William J. Babcock was head of the Physical Education Department of Richmond Hill High School and Chairman of the Richmond Hill Ontario Teachers' Federation Outdoor Education Committee. He wrote many articles pertaining to outdoor education.

Camp Robin Hood

  • Corporate body

Camp Robin Hood was established in 1946 at Sherwood Park in north Toronto. In approximately 1964, it moved to Markham, Ontario where Robin Hood Sports Academy was developed. In later years Camp Robin Hood acquired Camp Walden and Madawaska Camps. In addition to offering camping experiences, Camp Robin Hood offers school programs and provides facilities for corporate and private events.

Camp Tamarack

  • Corporate body

Camp Tamarack was established in 1922 as a Jewish Boy Scout's camp. The camp was situated on 350 acres of land in the Muskoka Lake District near Bracebridge, Ontario. The camp aimed to provide a camp setting where each boy counted. The boys were divided into small groups with two staff members to five boys. This allowed the boys to have individual attention instead of being part of a mass group of people. This Jewish Boy Scout Camp was owned by the Tamarack (59th) Association which was a member of the Ontario Camping Association. The camp was first located in the Lake of Bays area. The first Director was Mr. Edgar Reason, also first Scoutmaster of the 59th Scout Troop. In 1957, Stanley G. Wild was appointed Director. Activities at the camp included swimming, canoeing, water skiing and horseback riding as well as numerous other special events like baseball games, fishing, campouts, gymnastics and handicrafts. The campers lived in cabins while they were in the camp. In 1972 the camp closed.

Camp Tanamakoon

  • Corporate body

Camp Tanamakoon was established by Mary G. Hamilton, principal of Margaret Eaton School in Toronto, in 1925 and is located on Tanamakoon Lake in Algonquin Park. A summer camp for girls, Camp Tanamakoon offers an environmental education; activities include tripping, mountain biking, swimming, kayaking, canoeing, wood crafting, and various other activities. Owners of the Camp since its inception include: founder Mary G. Hamilton, 1925-1953; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Raymer, 1953-1974; Hugh and Carolea Butters, 1974-1984; and Kim and Marilyn Smith, 1984 to the present.

Camp X Historical Society

  • Corporate body

Camp X Historical Society is located in Whitby, Ontario, near the former site of Camp X. Camp X, which operated from 1941 to 1946, was a training camp responsible for training recruits for the Special Operations Executive of the British Security Coordination during World War II. It was comprised of two sections, the Special Training School No. 103, which trained allied agents in the techniques of secret warfare, and Hydra, a network which communicated messages between Canada, United States, and Great Britain. Camp X Historical Society was established to track down surviving SOE agents, and to document and catalogue their experiences. The Society is in the process of establishing a small museum on the original site of the Camp to house artifacts and memorabilia which document the operation.

Campbell family

  • Family

This fonds represents many different members of the Campbell family of Keene and their interests. The scrapbook was composed by Isabelle Fulton Miller Campbell, daughter of Isabella Brownlie Miller and James Miller, and deals with different areas of interest to her. The two diaries, written by Isabelle Fulton Miller Campbell, deal with every day life and reflect how a number of people lived during the time period covered by the diaries. There is a business ledger of William Campbell who was a tailor in Keene and he also appears to be responsible as an executor for people's estates including his mother's. There is also a day book from a Keene grocery store which lists what the Campbells and other people in the Village of Keene purchased. In "The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough, Ontario, 1825-1875" there a number of Campbells listed as living in Keene in 1836 and 1844. Please see "Keene United Church" by D. Gayle Nelson for more information on some of the Campbell's listed in the Atlas.

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was sketchy and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

Census taking in Canada was divided into enumeration districts which were usually located around cities and counties. The districts were divided in sub-districts which were usually located around towns, townships and city wards. Villages, small towns, parishes and seigneuries were generally enumerated as part of the township in which they were located. Census and county boundaries did not always coincide since boundaries and town names changed or disappeared. The first census in Canada was undertaken in 1666 by Intendant Jean Talon. Census taking was not required until it was put into the Constitution in 1867. Before 1867 census taking was inconsistent and it was not until 1851 that it became established as a way of assessing population and colonial needs for the government. (Taken from: "Census Returns, 1666-1891." Public Archives, Canada, 1987.)

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada into 19 Counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.) The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterbourgh County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2,169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it was not until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.) Hastings County was proclaimed the 11th county of Upper Canada in 1792. The second largest county in Ontario, it includes nineteen municipal townships: Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Carlow, Dungannon, Elzevir and Grimsthorpe, Faraday, Hershal, Hungerford, Huntingdon, Limerick, Madoc, Marmora and Lake, Mayo; Monteagle, Rawdon, Sidney, Thurlow, Tudor and Cashel, Tyendinaga, and Wollaston. Hastings was named after a military leader who had fought in the American Revolution, Francis Rawdon-Hastings (1754-1826). His family name was taken from the town of Hastings in Sussex, England. Until 1849 Hastings County was called the Victoria District. This was changed at that time by the Baldwin Act which replaced district councils with county councils. The first major industry in Hastings County was agriculture, and this was well-established by 1860, with Belleville having the largest saw mills west of Ottawa. Around this time, mining became an important attraction for new settlers, with the extraction of gold at Eldorado, Deloro, Gilmour, and Cordova. Once the Grand Trunk Railway began making stops in Belleville in 1856, the economy of the county improved immensely. Today tourism, lumbering and mining are the major industries of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places on Ontario, Part II." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1981.)

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