Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Arthur James Marshall Smith

  • Person

Arthur James Marshall Smith was born in Montreal, Quebec in 1902. He was educated at McGill University and received his B.A. in 1925 and his M.A. in 1926. In 1931 he received his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. At McGill University Smith edited the "McGill Daily Literary Supplement" from 1924 to 1925. When is was discontinued, Smith, along with F.R. Scott, founded and edited the "The McGill Fortnightly Review" in 1925. This was the first journal to publish modernist poetry and critical opinion in Canada. Throughout his lifetime, Smith's works were published in anthologies, and he became recognized nationally as a poet, critic and anthologist. He taught English at several American colleges before accepting a position, teaching English, at Michigan State University from 1936 until his retirement in 1972. Michigan University, upon his retirement, created the A.J.M. Smith Award, given annually for a noteworthy volume by a Canadian poet. Among Smith's most distinguished awards were the Governor General's Award in 1943, for "News of the phoenix and other poems", and the Lorne Pierce Medal in 1966. (Taken from: "Poets Between the Wars." Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited, 1969.) In 1978 A.J.M. Smith received an honorary Doctorate of Letters from Trent University. Trent University received a number of books and papers from Smith and a room on the first floor of the Bata Library was dedicated to him. In 1980 A.J.M. Smith died.

Bernice Loft Winslow

  • Person

Bernice Loft Winslow's Native name was "Dawendine". She was raised as an Anglican and was also familiar with the Longhouse religious traditions of her Mohawk ancestors. Her schooling was on the Six Nations Reserve and the high school in neighbouring Caledonia. After high school, she taught school for a number of years and began to speak to groups interested in native culture.

Woodville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Leslie Woolcott

  • Person

Leslie Woolcott is a feminist activist living in Peterborough, Ontario.

Young's Point sketch

  • Person

Edward C. Caddy (1815-1897) was a land surveyor who learned his trade in Peterborough between 1839 and 1842. He was also a painter in the Trent Valley District. His landscapes were primarily in water colour.

Scott Young

  • Person

Scott Young was born in 1918 in Cypress River, Manitoba. He started his writing career at age 18 for the Winnipeg Free Press in 1936. He was soon writing sports columns in Winnipeg, and later Toronto, and in 1949 published the first of 40 books. He has written a number of books which cover parts of his own life such as "Neil and Me"-- a book about his son Neil Young; and "A Writer's Life"-- an autobiography. His career in journalism has produced thousands of articles for "The Globe and Mail", "The Telegram", "Sports Illustrated", "Maclean's" and other magazines during the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's. Scott served in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II (1944-1945). Previous to this he was sent to England by Canadian Press (CP) to cover the news of the War. He has received numerous awards and a Doctorate of Letters, Honoris Causa, from Trent University. He has been married three times (Edna Blow Ragland aka Rassy; Astrid Carlson Mead; and Margaret Hogan) and has a number of children and step-children (Neil, Bob; Deidre, Astrid; Maggie, Caitlin and Erin).

Young Women's Christian Association

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Young Women's Christian Association was founded 1891 when a young man, who greatly appreciated what the Y.M.C.A. had done for him, felt that a similar organization should be offered to women. With the support of Mr. Colville, secretary of the Y.M.C.A., a meeting was arranged at which sixteen ladies attended (two from each church). These ladies became the charter members of the Peterborough Young Women's Christian Association. The first meeting took place over Long's Confectionery Shop on George Street. Bible studies, educational classes and club group meetings were held there. In 1892 a house on the north side of Brock Street (near George Street) was furnished to serve as a Residence for young girls who had no homes in the town. Before long all the work of the Association was carried out at the Brock Street residence. The Peterborough Y.W.C.A. was actively involved in many of the conferences and new ideas that came into the Association. For instance it was one of the first associations to take up Industrial work and offer meetings, in 1909, for girls employed at the electrical works. In 1901 the Y.W.C.A. needed to move into larger quarters due to the expansion of its members. They were able to secure rooms, with the aid of Hon. Senator Cox, on the west side of George Street and stayed there for two years. In 1904 the Y.W.C.A. decided it needed a Y.W.C.A. building and purchased the lot on the corner of Simcoe and Aylmer Streets. The Hon. Senator Cox provided rooms in the Bank of Commerce Building and the rooms on George Street and the house on Brock Street were given up. Mrs. Cox laid the cornerstone September 7, 1904 and the new building was opened in 1905. In 1912 rooms at 133 Rubidge street were formally opened. In 1916 a swimming pool was built and by May 30, 1918 was able to be used. In 1919 the Y.W.C.A. rented a cottage on Stoney Lake as a summer camp. The aim of the Y.W.C.A. was to provide religious education as well as special clubs, classes and parties to encourage the development of the all-round girl who would be the woman of the future. The Y.W.C.A. was considered a fellowship. In 1929 the Y.W.C.A. purchased nine acres of land near the centre of Stoney Lake as a campground, called Camp Inglestane and charged $7.00 a week per girl. The camp was sold at the end of the 1940's. The Y.W.C.A. continued to act as an employment bureau and forming clubs in the industrial sector. In June, 1939 the Peterborough Y.W.C.A. became more newly equipped with a more modern gymnasium and a new pool was opened. A nursery school opened in 1960. The Y.W.C.A. continued to grow and develop with each new year and national and international changes. In 1967 the Y.W.C.A. purchased the Knights of Columbus building as a Centennial project. This building was adjacent to the original Y building and was called Stevenson Hall in memory of James E. Stevenson, the original owner of the property. (Taken from: "The Peterborough Y.W.C.A. 1891 to 1981." Box 3, folder 2, Trent University Archives.) In the original Y.W.C.A. building programs such as Crossroads, which was a program for battered women and a series of shelters, and "Y's Buys" were run. The original building which was on the corner of Simcoe and Aylmer, and had been sold a number of years ago, burnt down on February 15, 1996. (See "Arthur" Volume 30, Issue 19, February 27, 1996, p 8.)

Douglas Sadler

  • Person

Douglas Sadler was born in London, England in 1916. He served in the 7th Armoured Division (Desert Rats) during World War II and with the Queen's Royal Regiment in Holland. He spent six months imprisoned in Oflag 79, Germany. It was during the World War II that Sadler met his future wife, Joan, in England. They were married in 1942. After the War, he served as a Captain in the Army and one of his tours took him to Singapore in 1947. He came to Canada in 1950 to work on Governor-General Vincent Massey's farm near Port Hope, Ontario and later worked for the Port Hope Evening Guide in advertising. This was the beginning of his newspaper career which ultimately led him to the Peterborough Examiner and the City of Peterborough in 1953. Part of his work at the Examiner included writing his now famous outdoor column, "Come Quietly With Me," which he wrote for more than 30 years. Douglas has written close to 1500 columns on every conceivable aspect of the environment. Late in his life, Douglas decided to return to school. He attended the old Peterborough Teacher's College, and upon graduation, began teaching with the Northumberland Board of Education. He later became the vice-principal of Warkworth School in 1969 and worked there for twelve years before taking a job as an outdoor education consultant. He then moved to the Peterborough County Board of Education. When the outdoor education program was cancelled in 1975, Douglas continued teaching at the Bailieboro School. At about the same time, Douglas became a member of the Peterborough Field Naturalists. After two years, he joined the Ontario Federation of Field Naturalists and was a member for sixteen years, two of which were spent as the Federation's president. Douglas has won the Frank Kortright Award twice and is an honorary life member of the Peterborough Field Naturalists. He earned a degree in geography in 1978 from Trent University and, in 1988, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from the same university. In 1987 he authored the book "Reading Natures Clues."

Caldwell family

  • Family

Hugh Caldwell Sr. (1824-1903) emigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1843 to the Waterloo area with his father and siblings. He married Ann Nancy MacDonald (1832-1903) in 1855 and settled in Mornington Township, Perth County. In January 1867, he sold his farm and tenant farmed near Strathroy, Ontario for some months before purchasing Lots 16 and 17, Concession 13 in Chandos Township, Peterborough County where he settled in December of that year. In 1875, he was appointed to the position of property assessor for Chandos, Anstruther, and Burleigh townships and held this position at various times until 1890. He opened the first post office in the Clydesdale Settlement of Chandos Township in his house; His son, Hugh Caldwell Jr. [1861-1914] lived part of his adult life in the Emo, Ontario area. Hugh Caldwell Sr. was the great-great grandfather of Leonard Caldwell and his siblings. Hugh Caldwell Jr. was a great uncle.

Central Public School

  • Corporate body

Central School was the first stone common school built in the Town of Peterborough. It was built on Murray Street in 1860 and, due to the increasing number of children enrolling, another school was built immediately west of Central School in 1871. South Central School was established in 1871 on the corner of Rubidge and Sherbrooke Streets. (Taken from: "The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Canada: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) The land it was built on was purchased for $600.00 in 1873. Later known to Trent University students as Rubidge Hall which was the first building to house the University.

Neads family

  • Family

Miss Neads was the organist at the Presbyterian Church in Bowmanville, Ontario, in 1876.

Upper Canada. Newcastle District

  • Corporate body

Newcastle District was created in 1802, and had been previously part of the Home District. Newcastle District encompassed the present day counties of Durham, Northumberland, Peterborough, Victoria, and all land to the north. In 1838, the District was divided into the Newcastle and Colborne Districts. In 1849, the district system was abolished, and the Newcastle District became known as Northumberland and Durham Counties in 1850, and Colborne District became Peterborough County in 1850. From the land comprising Peterborough County, Victoria County was created in 1852, and Haliburton County was created in 1874. (Taken from: Hillman, Thomas A. "A Statutory Chronology of Ontario: Counties and Municipalities." Gananoque: Langdale Press, 1988.)

Denis Smith

  • Person

S.G. Denis Smith was born in 1932 in Edmonton. In 1953 he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Honours, from McGill University. At McGill he received the J.W. McConnell Scholarship and an I.O.D.E. post-graduate scholarship for Oxford University in England. From 1953 to 1956 Denis attended Oxford University and obtained his Master's Degree and a Bachelor of Literature. While in Oxford he received an Exhibition Scholarship and a grant from the Bryce Fund to travel and study in Poland. In 1956 he returned to Canada and by 1962 had written a number of papers and reviews on political material. Denis Smith has held a number of university positions throughout his career. He was with the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto, 1956 to 1957; Department of Political Science, York University, 1960 to 1961 and was the first Registrar of that University. He held the Vice-President's position at Trent University from 1964 to 1967. He was Master of Champlain College from 1969 to 1971 and a professor in the Department of Political Studies to 1983 when he left to teach and become Dean of Social Sciences at the University of Western Ontario. At Trent he was Chairman of the Politics Department from 1967 to 1968. He was editor of the Journal of Canadian Studies from 1966 to 1975; editor of the Canadian Forum from 1975 to 1979 and President of the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association from 1975 to 1977. He has written several books including: Bleeding Hearts, Bleeding Country, 1971; Gentle Patriot, 1973; Diplomacy of Fear, 1988; Rogue Tory, 1995; Prisoners of Cabrera, 2001; Ignatieff's World: A Liberal Leader for the 21st Century?, 2006; Ignatieff's World Updated: Iggy goes to Ottawa, 2009; General Miranda’s Wars: Turmoil and Revolt in Spanish America, 1750-1816, 2013; and, A Dissenting Voice: Essays, Addresses, Polemics, Diversions, 1959 - 2015, 2017.

Frances Anne Stewart

  • Person

Frances Anne Stewart (nee Browne) was born May 24, 1794, daughter of Reverend Francis Browne and Anna Maria Noble, in Dublin, Ireland. In 1796, Rev. Browne died quite suddenly in front of his wife. The resulting shock left Frances' mother somewhat of an invalid until she died in 1809. Frances was left in the care of her great-uncle, Robert Waller in Allanstown, Ireland, where she was raised by Harriet Beaufort, who managed the household. Harriet was a well educated young woman, and sought to give Frances the same quality of education. Under Harriet's instruction, Frances received a much more academic education than was the norm for young girls of those days. In the summer of 1816, Frances, and her aunt Susan went to visit some distant friends, the Stewarts, who lived near Belfast. This is where Frances met her future husband, Thomas Alexander Stewart (1786-1847). They were married December 16, 1816. Thomas worked for the firm of Robert Reid and Son, which manufactured linen, cotton and silk. When the company ran into trouble, and eventually bankruptcy, Frances and Thomas decided to emigrate to Canada. The Stewarts went with Thomas' brother-in-law, and former business partner, Robert Reid and his family. The party of 27 set sail from Belfast Lough, on June 1, 1822. Seven weeks were spent on the ship before reaching Quebec. From there they traveled to Kingston, and then on to York, where Stewart and Reid were each granted 1200 acres, provided they settled in an unsurveyed township. Douro Township was suggested as a promising region. On September 9, 1822, Stewart and Reid traveled to the area with Richard Birdsall, the surveyor, and each chose land on the Otonabee River. Life in Douro Township was very isolated for Frances, but she managed well on her own, looking after her home and children. Thomas Stewart died in 1847 from typhoid fever, and Frances Anne died several years later on February 24, 1872 at Goodwood. Extensive biographical information on the Stewart family, plus friends, neighbours, and associates, may be found in accession 02-001.

Thomas H.B. Symons

  • Person

Thomas H.B. Symons was born at Toronto, Ontario 30 May 1929, son of Harry Lutz Symons and Dorothy Sarah Bull. He was educated at Upper Canada College, University of Toronto (B.A. 1951), and Oxford University (B.A. 1953, M.A. 1957). He married Christine Ryerson 17 August 1963 and with her had three children: Mary, Ryerson and Jeffery. Professor Symons held many posts as an educator, including Assistant Dean of Men, Trinity College and Instructor of History, University of Toronto 1953-1955; and Dean, Devonshire House, University of Toronto 1955-63. His most notable post, however, was as the founding President and Vice-Chancellor of Trent University, 1961-1972. Symons also held many presidencies, chairmanships and memberships in various organizations, mainly dealing with the topics of education, Canadian studies, Indigenous rights and human rights. From 1971 to 1973, Symons was the President of the Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples. He was the author of several reports and articles and contributed chapters to many books including: "Political Education in Canada" 1988; "Archives Libraries and the Canadian Heritage" 1983; "A Century of Canada's Arctic Islands, 1880-1980" 1981; "A History of Peel County" 1967; and "Native Rights in Canada" 1970. Professor Symons resided in Peterborough, Ontario until his death 1 January 2021. (Taken in part from: Canadian Who's Who, 1993. Toronto: University of Toronto Press Incorporated, 1993.)

John Merton Bowes

  • Person

John Merton Bowes was born in California in 1927. He first became a licensed real estate agent in 1950 at the age of 23. He began working in Toronto where he was the manager of Ridout Real Estate. He later moved to Peterborough, Ontario and founded his own firm, now known as Re/Max Eastern, in 1980. He went on to collaborate with Bill Cocks and together they established Bowes and Cocks Ltd., of which he was the president for 15 years. Bowes dedicated his career to ensuring that the development of Peterborough’s real estate was a reflection of the City’s needs as it doubled in population from 40,000 to 80,000 citizens in a few decades. One of his most notable moments includes his initial proposal of a toll road linking the QEW, southwest of Toronto, with Highway 115/7 in the 1990s. John Merton Bowes was the author of two books: Dreams For Sale – Make Me an Offer and Greater Peterborough – Building A Metropolis in Kawartha Cottage Country. He died in Peterborough in 2021.

Pengelley family

  • Family

Harriet Catherine Brock was the daughter of Daniel de Lisle Brock (1762-1842), the chief magistrate of the Isle of Guernsey from 1821 to 1842. She was the niece of Sir Isaac Brock who was killed at Queenston Heights, Upper Canada, 1812. On September 16, 1834 Harriet married Captain Robert Lamport Pengelley. Robert Pengelley was born at Fowey, Cornwall in 1798, the son of Captain John Pengelley (killed at Palermo 1834) and Catherine Lamport. After being wounded at the Battle Lissa, Robert was rewarded by being appointed agent for the Brock estate in South Monaghan, Upper Canada, and given a piece of land on Rice Lake subsequently called "Brocklands". (Note: As of 2018, "Brocklands" was still held by Pengelley family descendants). On April 6, 1835 Robert and Harriet Pengelley sailed for Upper Canada, arriving in New York on May 7, 1835 they took a steamer for Albany and then traveled to Toronto, Upper Canada. After a trip to Guelph to look at land, they journeyed to South Monaghan, arriving in July 1835. Harriet died less than a year later, June 6, 1836, leaving no children. Robert secondly married in Monaghan Township in 1838 to Lydia Emily Roche/Roach; they had five children, only one of whom survived to adulthood, Theodore Robert Pengelley.

Note: For further information about the Brock family, see A Brock Family History: Isaac Brock and his Guernsey family, authored by Janice Shersby; commissioned by Caroline Brock, 2012 (located in Special Collections FC 443 .B8 S42 2012).

Note: For further information about the Pengelley, Brock, Roche and Scriven families, see Connections Between the Names Pengelley, Brock, Roche & Scriven in Monaghan Township, authored by Robert Bowley, 1993 (located in Special Collections [TC] CS 89 .B69 1993).

Dawn L. Smith

  • Person

Professor Dawn L. Smith was born in London, England, in 1932 and studied French and Spanish at Oxford University from 1952 to 1955. She emigrated to Canada in 1961. She received her D.Phil in Spanish Literature from Oxford University in 1975 and taught Spanish at Trent until her retirement in 1996. She currently holds the position of Professor Emeritus of Hispanic Studies. She is the author of numerous articles on the Spanish Comedia and has edited a critical edition of Tirso de Molina's La mujer que manda en casa.

Dawn and Denis Smith

  • Family

Professor Dawn L. Smith was born in London, England, in 1932 and studied French and Spanish at Oxford University from 1952 to 1955. She emigrated to Canada in 1961. She received her D.Phil in Spanish Literature from Oxford University in 1975 and taught Spanish at Trent until her retirement in 1996. She currently holds the position of Professor Emeritus of Hispanic Studies. She is the author of numerous articles on the Spanish Comedia and has edited a critical edition of Tirso de Molina's La mujer que manda en casa.

S.G. Denis Smith was born in 1932 in Edmonton. In 1953 he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Honours, from McGill University. At McGill he received the J.W. McConnell Scholarship and an I.O.D.E. post-graduate scholarship for Oxford University in England. From 1953 to 1956 Denis attended Oxford University and obtained his Master's Degree and a Bachelor of Literature. While in Oxford he received an Exhibition Scholarship and a grant from the Bryce Fund to travel and study in Poland. In 1956 he returned to Canada and by 1962 had written a number of papers and reviews on political material. Denis Smith has held a number of university positions throughout his career. He was with the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto, 1956 to 1957; Department of Political Science, York University, 1960 to 1961 and was the first Registrar of that University. He held the Vice-President's position at Trent University from 1964 to 1967. He was Master of Champlain College from 1969 to 1971 and a professor in the Department of Political Studies to 1983 when he left to teach and become Dean of Social Sciences at the University of Western Ontario. At Trent he was Chairman of the Politics Department from 1967 to 1968. He was editor of the Journal of Canadian Studies from 1966 to 1975; editor of the Canadian Forum from 1975 to 1979 and President of the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association from 1975 to 1977. He has written several books including: Bleeding Hearts, Bleeding Country, 1971; Gentle Patriot, 1973; Diplomacy of Fear, 1988; Rogue Tory, 1995; Prisoners of Cabrara, 2001; Ignatieff's World: A Liberal Leader for the 21st Century?" 2006; Ignatieff's World Updated: Iggy goes to Ottawa" 2009; and General Miranda’s Wars: Turmoil and Revolt in Spanish America, 1750-1816, 2013.

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