Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

William Lloyd (Moon) Wootton

  • Person

William Lloyd (Moon) Wootton (1927-1989) was a charter inductee in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in Westminster, B.C. and a member of the Peterborough & District Sports Hall of Fame and the Owen Sound Sports Hall of Fame. He became legendary in Peterborough in the 1940s and 1950s where he played goalie, breaking records and contributing to the winning of the prestigious Mann Cup for five consecutive years. Dozens of newspaper clippings published in Peterborough, Owen Sound and Westminster attest to the fame and popularity that Wootton achieved. The fonds reflects a grassroots Canadian story and is a significant historical record of mid-20th century lacrosse in Peterborough where the sport has gained widespread recognition that continues to the present day.

William John Eccles

  • Person

William John Eccles was born in Yorkshire, England in 1917 and came to Canada in 1928. He served overseas in the RCAF during World War II before studying at McGill University and the Sorbonne. A well-known historian and former faculty member of the Universities of Manitoba and Alberta, he is presently with the History Department, University of Toronto. He has written several articles and books on Canadian history, with a emphasis on the social history of New France. "With the true historian's determination to test even the most widely accepted truths, with an instinct for ferreting out fresh evidence, with a bold lack of respect for time-tested "facts," he has successfully challenged established doctrine at a number of points in Canadian history." (Taken from Ray Allen Billington's foreword in "The Canadian Frontier 1534-1760", revised edition, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969).

William Henry Seward

  • Person

William Henry Seward was born in May 1801 in Florida, New York. His father was Doctor Samuel S. Seward, a medical doctor and merchant. His mother was of Irish descent. William entered Union in 1816 after preparation at Farmer's Hall academy, Goshen, New York, and graduated in 1820. He read law with John Anthon in New York City, and with John Duer and Ogden Hoffman in Goshen, and was admitted to the bar at Utica in 1822. Seward then settled in Auburn, New York in January 1823 as the partner of Elijah Miller, the first Judge of Cayuga county. In 1824 he married Elijah Miller's daughter Frances Adeline. Throughout the late 1820's and 1830's Seward became involved in politics. The Whig party nominated him for governor in 1834, but Seward was defeated in the election by William L. Marcy. He was again nominated for governor in 1838 and won the election by a majority of 10,421. His liberal and democratic ideals caused much dissention within the Whig party, but he was once again re-elected in 1840 with a rather diminished majority. In February 1849, Seward was elected U.S senator and became known as the foremost opponent of slavery in the Whig party. In 1855, he was re-elected to the senate and again spent much of his time fighting slavery. In 1860, he was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination but he lost the nomination to Abraham Lincoln. Seward supported Lincoln's campaign, and in turn, after being elected President, Lincoln appointed Seward Secretary of State. After eight years of tenure, he retired from office in March 1869. In 1870 Seward embarked on a journey around the world and when he returned home, he dedicated his time to the writing of a narrative on his travels, and after its completion, he began a history of his life and times. Unfortunately, the autobiography was incomplete at the time of his death on October 10, 1872.

William Hamilton Munro

  • Person

William Hamilton Munro (1882-1976) was born in Peterborough, Ontario, the oldest son of George and Euphemie Hamilton Munro. He attended public school and high school in Peterborough and later entered the School of Practical Science, University of Toronto, from which he graduated in 1904. He joined the engineering staff of his grandfather's firm, the William Hamilton Manufacturing Company, for a short time and later worked for other engineering companies. First with John B. McRae of Ottawa and later with Smith Kerry & Chase of Toronto. During this period, Munro gained wide experience in dam and power house construction. In 1909, W.H. Munro was transferred to the Electric Power Company of Ontario and 1910 was appointed manager of the Peterborough Light & Power and Radial Railway Companies, branches of Electric Power. He remained in this position until 1915 when the company was expropriated by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. He then joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and went overseas as a transport officer. On his arrival in England, W.H. Munro was stationed at a reception and training base at Shorncliffe, Kent. Here he remained for eight months before being posted to northern France early in 1916. In France he was appointed workshop officer of No. 3 Canadian Ammunition Sub Park. He was still in northern France on Armistice Day, 1918 and was with the Canadian Forces during their brief occupation of Germany in 1919. On May 29, 1919, Munro married Angele Melina Marie Pouille of Bruay, Pas de Calais, France. He took his military discharge in England and joined Vickers Limited of London and Barrow-in-Furness. This involved him in water turbine engineering and sales which led to a good deal of travel. He remained in England until 1925 when he was appointed sales manager of Canadian Vickers of Montreal. Munro left Vickers in 1926 to become manager of the Nova Scotia Tramways and Power Company in Halifax. He remained in this position until 1928 when he was appointed manager of the Bolivian Power Company Limited in La Paz, Bolivia. In 1933, W.H. Munro returned to Canada and joined International Utilities Limited as general manager of one of its divisions, the Ottawa Light, Heat & Power Company until it was taken over by Ontario Hydro in 1949. He remained as manager of International Utilities until his retirement in 1951 when he and his wife returned to Peterborough, Ontario. W.H. Munro died in 1976.

William Hamilton House

  • Corporate body

It is believed that in 1880 John E. Belcher built the house for William Hamilton, the developer of a machine shop which became one of Peterborough's largest and most important industries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house is solid brick, cream in colour, and has a two storey projecting bay with portico and entrance. The William Hamilton house is presently owned by the Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation for the Diocese of Peterborough. A request for designation in accordance with the provisions of the Ontario Heritage Act, 1974, was filed 31 October 1985 by the Peterborough Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee.

William H. Ives

  • Person

William H. Ives was a builder and a contractor in Colborne, Ontario, at the end of the nineteenth century.

William Ewart Taylor

  • Person

William Ewart Taylor Jr. was born 21 November 1927 in Toronto to William E. Taylor and Margaret T. Patrick. He received his B.A. at the University of Toronto in 1951; his M.A. at the University of Illinois in 1952 and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1965. He married Joan Doris Elliott, of Scarborough, Ontario, 12 September 1952. Together they had three children. William was the Director of the National Museum of Man (now the Canadian Museum of Civilization); Director for the Canadian Centre for Anthropological Research and Past Chairman of the Board of Governors for the Canadian War Museum. He made several discoveries in Inuit anthropology and archaeology between 1950 and 1960. He published The Arnapik and other Sites in 1968. He wrote innumerable professional papers on the Arctic and the Inuit people. He died in 1994.

William Chirpaw

  • Person

William J. Chirpaw ran a hotel and a lumber business at Victoria Road, Bexley Township in Victoria County. Chirpaw was Reeve of Bexley at one time.

William Brownscombe

  • Person

William Brownscombe (1830-1893) was a potter by trade in Peterborough.

William Barton Northrup

  • Person

William Barton Northrup was born in Belleville, Canada West on October 19, 1856 to A.G. Northrup. W.B. Northrup married twice. His first marriage occured June, 1879 to Minnie Proctor and his second marriage occured June, 1907 to Mary Schryrer Chemow. He attended the Belleville Grammar School, Upper Canada College in Toronto and the University of Toronto where he received his Bachelor of Arts and Masters Degree. He was called to the Ontario Bar in 1878. He became head of the firm of Northrup and Roberts in Belleville. In 1891 he was defeated when he ran as a candidate for Hastings County, East, but at a by-election on February 20, 1892 he was elected to the House of Commons. He was defeated in 1896 and re-elected in 1900, 1904, 1908 and 1911. From March 1918 to December 1924 he was Clerk of the House of Commons. In 1902 he accompanied Prime Minister Borden on his North-West tour of Canada. He was a Conservative. He died October 22, 1925 at Ottawa, Ontario. (Taken from: "The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography." 4th ed. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1985.)

William Arthur Breyfogle

  • Person

William Arthur Breyfogle was born in Toronto in 1905. He moved with his parents to Peterborough in 1910. He went to Dartmouth College in New Hampshire and graduated with a Rhodes Scholarship in 1928. He attended Magdalen College in Oxford and later attended the University of Munich in Germany. He married Elizabeth Hopwood in 1939. He had his first short story published in 1932 in the North American Review. He had numerous works published in such magazines as Macleans, Colliers, Toronto Star Weekly, and many others. At the time of his death he had begun to write a detective novel called The Phoenix and the Tavern. William (Bill) Breyfogle died of anaphylactic shock from a bee sting in 1958.

Willan family

  • Family

Robert Willan and Edward Willan seem to have been the owners of the two work books which comprise this fonds. Robert and Edward may have been brothers or even father and son. Their books are dated 1806 and 1832, respectively. An inscription on the last page of Edward's book reads "Thomas M. Willan, South Monaghan."

We-Peterborough: World Emergency Centre for Assertive Non-Violence

  • Corporate body

We-Can: World Emergency Centre for Non-Violence was the local Peterborough Group of Alliance for Non-Violent Action. The Alliance for Non-Violent Action was a geographically dispersed collective of groups and individuals who gathered together to plan, organize and participate in education and events for non-violent direct action. They sought to remove oppression from the world through building a non-oppressive and non-exploitative world by removing the economic and political institutions and practices which supported injustice. They did this through supportive local groups such as We-Can. The strategy behind the Alliance organizations was through organizing public, non-violent actions and the development of educational materials, resources and projects. We-Can in Peterborough took on protests at the Litton Systems Plant in Rexdale, Ontario; a study on dismantling bombs and the cruise missile amongst other projects.

Wendaban Stewardship Authority

  • Corporate body

The Wendaban Stewardship Authority (WSA) was created through a Memorandum of Understanding of April, 1990 and an Addendum of May 23, 1991 in which the Ontario and Teme-Augama Anishnabai governments agreed to form a “Stewardship Council” with co-management jurisdiction over four geographic townships in the Sudbury/Nipissing district of northern Ontario: Acadia; Shelburne; Canton; and Delhi. The total land area is approximately 400 square kilometres. The area is located northwest of Lake Temagami and includes the shores of Lakes Wakimika, Diamond, and the northern part of Obabika. (Taken from promotional materials issued by the WSA).

W.E. Massey-Cooke

  • Person

Lieutenant, later Captain, W.E. Massey-Cooke, was from Millbrook, Ontario. He served with the Canadian Engineers during the World War I and was at one time during his military career a prisoner of war at Gutersloh, Germany.

Wayland Drew

  • Person

Wayland Drew was born in 1932 in Oshawa, Ontario. He graduated with a B.A. Honours in 1957 from Victoria College at the University of Toronto. He majored in English Language and Literature. He married Gwendolyn Parrott in October of 1957. They had four children, Scott, Marda, Paula and Cindy. Drew raised his family in Port Perry, Ontario and Bracebridge, Ontario. Drew began to write short stories and poetry in high school and university. Drew's first published novel, "The Wabeno Feast," was released in 1973 by Anansi. Drew's interest in Canadian history, Native culture and social ecology comes through in this novel and his other works. "The Wabeno Feast" was republished in 1985 by General Publishing. Since "The Wabeno Feast," Drew has written eleven other books of fiction and non-fiction. These include the non-fiction books, "Superior: The Haunted Shore" (1975), "A Sea Within: the Gulf of St. Lawrence" (1984), both with photography by his friend, Bruce Litteljohn, and "Brown's Weir" (1983) with photography by his wife, Gwen. In the late 1970s, Drew was approached by a friend, Matthew Robbins, to write a novelization of the film script, "Corvette Summer." The novelization was released in conjuction with the film in 1978. Drew proceeded to write the novelizations of three other film scripts: "Dragonslayer" (1981), "Batteries Not Included" (1987), and "Willow" (1989). Drew produced a science-fiction trilogy, "The Erthring Cycle," in the mid-eighties. The titles include "The Memoirs of Alcheringia" (1984), "The Gaian Expedient" (1985), and "The Master of Norriya" (1986). His final novel, "The Halfway Man," was published in 1989 by Oberon. Drew wrote and published works of short fiction and non-fiction. Some of his early stories were published in "The Tamarack Review" and "Acta Victoriana." Later short fiction was published in collections such as "New Canadian Short Stories," "Anthology," "Islands of Hope," and "Once Upon a Time." Drew also wrote scripts for CBC radio and for a Ministry of Natural Resources film called "Places Out of Time" (1994). He also wrote short non-fiction for a variety of publications such as "Ontario Naturalist," "Alternatives," "The Illustrated Natural History of Canada," and "Green Teacher." Drew began teaching high school in Port Perry, Ontario, in 1961. He earned a teaching certificate by taking summer courses at the Ontario College of Education while teaching during the school year. As a teacher, he also worked at the Ministry of Education and Bracebridge and Muskoka Lakes Secondary School. Drew took leaves from teaching in order to write full time, though he also wrote part-time while teaching. He retired from teaching in 1994. In addition to writing and teaching, Drew was active in the community. He was president of the Historical Society of Bracebridge, and chair of the "Signs of Hope" environmental conference in 1991. Drew also gave numerous guest lectures and facilitated workshops. Drew's acomplishments were recognized formally twice in 1991. In October of that year, Drew was honoured with the Lieutenant-Governor's Award from the Conservation Council of Ontario. Later that month, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Trent University. Wayland Drew died on December 3, 1998.

Way family

  • Family

Jacob Way (1804-1882) was born in Northport, Prince Edward County. He moved with his wife Alzina Moran (1823-1851) and their son Edward Hoag Way (1845-1922) to Tyendinega Township, Hastings County. After Alzina’s death, Jacob married Delilah (Scriver) Herns (b. 1823) and they had a son Gideon Shepard Way (1853-1937). The family moved to Murray Township in Northumberland County. With the exception of Alzina who is buried in Tyendinega, the others are buried in the Stockdale Cemetery in Hastings County, north of the area where, over time, all three had farmed and raised their families. Extended family names include Scriver, Ostrander, Herns, and Moran. (Information provided by Yvonne A. Green).

Warkworth Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Walter Nichol Davidson Family

  • Family

The family of Walter Nichol Davidson resided in Brighton, Ontario. Walter Davidson (?-1936) was a merchant-tailor. He married Isabella Massie D. McDonald (?-1946). They had two daughters: Annie Helen (1878-?) and Jessie Isabella. Annie wasa school teacher and she studied through correspondence courses from the University of Toronto Extension Branch. She married dentist by the last name of Harnden. This Davidson family maybe related to the Davidson family [(77-003)]: https://www.trentu.ca/library/archives/77-003 of Cobourg, Ontario. One letter in the 86-015 fonds is addressed to a W.N. Davidson and speaks of a "Lizzie", perhaps Elizabeth, and a "Jim", perhaps James. Both collections are similar in that they contain large number of deeds and mortgages.

Walter Kenyon

  • Person

Walter Kenyon was a noted Ontario archaeologist, and curator of Canadian archaeology at the Royal Ontario Museum for twenty-five years.

Wallis family

  • Family

(Biographical information copied from Trent University Archives newsletter "Archives News", Issue Number 48, January 2014: "The Wallis Family" by Janice Millard).

"The link between the two [Wallis family and Forbes family] is Louisa Forbes who became Mrs. James Wallis. Louisa was the mother of well-known Peterborough-born artist and sculptor Katherine Wallis and Louisa’s father was Capt. Robert Miller/Millar Forbes.

Capt. Robert Miller Forbes had a distinguished career in the British Navy. It was, however, marred by an incident in 1798. Robert caused his ship commander, Capt. Lord Henry Paulet, later Earl St. Vincent, to be court martialled. Paulet apparently struck the then Lieutenant Forbes while Forbes was on duty on their ship – the Thalia. Paulet lost the case - but soon after he was given clemency, re-instated, and in 1819 became a Vice-Admiral. Robert Miller did not fare as well. In a transcribed letter he says that “he became the object of the most cruel and vindictive persecution… that has proved a barrier to his professional progress thro’ the mis-representations of that distinguished officer.”

After the Napoleonic Wars Robert Forbes, along with a number of ex-British military personnel, took their families and settled in France. Robert’s first child, Louisa, was born in Avranches, France. There is a watercolour in our new donation of the Church where Louisa was christened. It is likely by Katherine Wallis. The Forbes family moved around in Europe and sons were born in St. Servan Sur Merin Brittany, France. Finally the family moved to Peterborough.

Robert Forbes had an even more well-known brother – Charles John Forbes. Charles was in both the British Navy and the British Army. While in the Navy, Charles was present at the Battle of the Nile (also called the Battle of Aboukir) where Nelson defeated the French Navy. Another person at Aboukir was Charles Rubidge. Perhaps Charles Forbes and Charles Rubidge reminisced together about old battles.

While in the British Army, Charles Forbes was present for the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Our donation contains a letter written 29 Jan. 1815 on board H.M.S. Alceste, off Cat Island (near New Orleans), and sent to James Cobb, Secretary, East India Company (a cousin). In the letter Charles says that the information given to the Admiral was “fallacious” and that unlike what they had been led to believe, no “settlers of Louisiana and the Floridas” flocked to join the British cause and hence they had insufficient troops for the encounter with the Americans. It’s interesting to note that even by the end of January, Charles did not know that a treaty to end the War had been signed.

Charles had two separate enlistment periods with the British Army. Like his brother, he retired when the Napoleonic Wars were over and lived in Europe, but a few years later he re-enlisted in the Army. In 1824 he worked for the Commissariat in Nova Scotia and in 1825 he went to Montreal and stayed for 8 years. He was then posted to Jamaica and, like many Europeans who lived in the tropics, became ill. He briefly to went to England and then finally retired at half pay back in Quebec.

While posted in Quebec he acted as Commissary General for the Army and ensured there were supplies for the engineers and workers who were building canals in the Montreal region. While he was there he purchased land in the village of Carillon, on the Ottawa River just south of Lachute, Quebec, in what is now the Argenteuil Region of Quebec.

There he built a wonderful house called “Bellevue”. In our newly acquired scrapbook of Louisa Forbes there is a sketch of that house. Charles was known far and wide for his hospitality and many important people would visit him – including the Governors General.

Another well-known owner of land in the area was Sidney Robert Bellingham - nephew of Thomas A. Stewart. Sidney was very interested in politics and played a role in the 1837 rebellion – as did the British veteran Charles John Forbes."

Wallace Point Bridge and Road Company

  • Corporate body

The Wallace Point Bridge and Road Company was created on October 31, 1866 for the express purpose of building a road and bridge from South Monaghan Township, County of Northumberland, across the Otonabee River, to Wallace Point, Otonabee Township, County of Peterborough. The total distance of the road, including the bridge, was to be 2 1/4 miles. It is unknown when the company ceased to exist.

Waddell family

  • Family

Robert Waddell and Hugh Waddell were brothers who were both businessmen in Durham County in the middle to late 1800's and the early 1900's. Robert Waddell resided in Balieboro and Hugh Waddell lived in Millbrook, Ontario.

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