Showing 135 results

Places
Places term Scope note Archival description count People, organizations, and families count
Oakville, Ontario 0 0
Ottawa, Ontario 5 0
Hastings and Prince Edward Counties 26 0
Victoria County 78 0
Northumberland and Durham Counties 121 0
Adamson Power House
  • Named in 1987 after Stan Adamson, a member of Trent's First Board of Governors; the power house was donated to the University by the Canadian General Electric Company.
0 0
Faryon Bridge
  • Named for Reginald R. Faryon, “one of the first citizens of Peterborough to suggest the establishment of a university in the city, and an early organizer...”; his letter to the Peterborough Examiner advocating a post-secondary institution for the city appeared in December 1957; the bridge was designed by associates from Ron Thom's office including Paul Merrick and Morden Yolles.
1 0
Justin Chiu Stadium
  • Named after Trent alum and philanthropist Justin Chiu.
0 0
Six Nations of the Grand River 8 0
Stoney Lake 2 0
Rice Lake
  • Rice Lake was formed by glacial activity. The first people to settle near Rice Lake were the Mississaugas and, later, emigrants from Scotland, Ireland, Germany and America. Samuel de Champlain was the first European to see Rice Lake, which at that point was surrounded by forests. In 1793 a trading post was established by Jacob and Lawrence Herkimer at the mouth of the Otonabee River on Rice Lake. The next person to settle near Rice Lake was Charles Fothergill. In the 1800's the Natives started to harvest rice from the lake for trade. However it was not until 1818 when settlers were allowed to settle in the area of Rice Lake. Most of the business carried on at the Lake was trade and ferrying people across the Lake. Eventually farming took precedence as more and more settlers arrived. Communities such as Gore's Landing sprang up around the Lake with churches, schools, taverns, hotels and other businesses becoming established as well.
7 0
Trent Nature Areas 3 0
Bon Echo Provincial Park 1 0
Algonquin Provincial Park 5 1
Bata Library
  • The building was designed by Ronald H. Thom (1968-1969), opened in fall 1969, and was renovated in 1993-1994 (architect, Sampson Baird) and 2017-2018. The Bata Library was named for Thomas J. Bata, “in recognition of Mr. Bata's generous gift to the Development Fund for the completion of the library project”; “internationally respected industrialist, generous benefactor, and dedicated member of the Board of Governors in the Challenging Pioneer Years of Trent University.”
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
Athletic Building
  • Named after P.S.B. Wilson, the first Director of Athletics at Trent University; the pool is named after Fl. Lt. Allan Marshall, an “outstanding swimmer from Peterborough in the '40s” who held five Canadian swimming records; as early as 1948 he indicated in a conversation with Robertson Davies, editor of the Peterborough Examiner, that he was a strong supporter of a proposed university in Peterborough; the building was first built in 1977 and renovated in 2010.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
Agnes Neill Health Services Centre
  • Named for Agnes Campbell Neill who was a pioneer in Canadian nursing and became Matron-in-Chief of Canadian nurses who served during the Second World War.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
0 0
Bagnani Hall
  • Bagnani Hall is part of Traill College. Designed by Lett Architects (2010)
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
Champlain College
  • Opened in fall 1967, the building is named after Samuel de Champlain, explorer who descended the Otonabee River in this area in 1615.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
Enwayaang

Use for: Enweying

  • Together The First Peoples House of Learning and Peter Gzowski College comprise Enweying; the name means “The Way We Speak Together.” (Note: the name Enweying was later changed to Enwayaang)
  • The name was first Enweying, and was later changed to Enwayaang.
0 0
Founders Walk
  • The pathway between the Library, along the river over to and behind the Athletic facility. A plaque commemorates citizens active in proposing and working towards the realization of Trent University.
1 0
Frost Centre
  • Named after Leslie Frost (1895-1973), Conservative premier of Ontario from Lindsay from 1949 to 1961, and first Chancellor of Trent University.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
Gzowski College
  • Named for broadcaster, journalist and author Peter Gzowski (1934-2002); Chancellor of Trent University, 1999-2002; the colours of the building come from the four colours of the medicine wheel: yellow, red, black and white.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
James McLean Oliver Ecological Centre
  • Named the James McLean Oliver Ecological Centre, the property on Pigeon Lake was donated by his daughter Marjorie McLean Oliver to Trent in 1998.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
0 0
Julian Blackburn College
  • Julian Blackburn was a psychology professor and one of the “mid-wives” that Trent seconded from 3 established universities to help get Trent off the ground; was first chairman of part-time studies at Trent and part-time program named after him.
  • To be used for records about the building, not the administrative unit.
1 0
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