Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

North Monaghan Township

  • Corporate body

North Monaghan is the smallest township in the County of Peterborough. It is bounded on the north by the township of Smith, on the south by the County of Northumberland, on the west by Cavan township (County of Durham), and on the east by the Otonabee River. The Township was first surveyed by Samuel Wilmot in 1817 and settlement began the same year. In 1818, Wilmot wrote to the surveyor general, suggesting that lots 14, 15, and 16 on concession 13 be reserved as a site for a village. This site became the village of Peterborough and remained as such until January 1, 1850, when it was officially severed from North Monaghan and incorporated as the Town of Peterborough. As a result, North Monaghan lost 350 families (2,100 persons), and numerous businesses, industries, shops and services. In the 1852 census return, the number of householders left in North Monaghan totalled 100. The only village which remained in the township was Springville which is situated on the boundary of North Monaghan and Cavan townships. Due to North Monaghan's close proximity with the town of Peterborough and Cavan township, there was never a need to re-build the resources which were lost to Peterborugh in 1850, and today, North Monaghan township is very much a "suburb" of the City of Peterborough.

Mary Q. Ollerhead

  • Person

Mary Quarrie Ollerhead's family originated in Liverpool, England. She had a sister named Elizabeth Walker Ollerhead and she never married. In 1920 she visited Naples in Italy and in 1921 she visited England. She worked as a teacher in Toronto's Public Schools for a number of years. Mary was retired from the Toronto School Board 19 May 1933 after which she received monies from the Teacher's Superannuation Commission. She lived at Homewood Avenue while she was teaching. She was an active member of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto. Around the 1940's or 1950's she started to live at 55 Belmont Street, a residence for seniors. In July of 1952 she became quite ill and required professional nursing care. Mary Ollerhead died in the autumn of 1952 and was buried in the family plot in Brampton, Ontario.

John Norton

  • Person

John Norton (ca. 1763-1831) author, explorer, soldier, trader, and politician, led what has been recognized as a varied and intriguing life among the native populations of North America from Georgina to the Grand River in Upper Canada, where he was a close friend and adviser to Joseph Brant. Norton himself was of Cherokee descent on his father's side.

Trevor Lloyd

  • Person

Henry Trevor Lloyd was born in 1906 in London, England and grew up in Wales. He received a B.Sc. from Bristol University in 1929. In 1930 he visited Canada with the debating team of the British National Union of Students. In the same year he emigrated to Canada to teach at Ravenscourt School in Winnipeg. He wrote his Ph.D. at Clarke University in 1940. He was assistant Professor of Geography at Carleton College in Minnisota until 1942 when he joined the faculty at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. Lloyd was in New Hampshire from 1944 to 1952. During the summer of 1942 he filmed the early activities of the Canal Project on the Mackenzie River for the National Film Board. During the late War and post-war years he was seconded from Carleton College to the Canadian Government. He was first assigned to the Wartime Information Bureau. From 1944 to 1945 he served as acting Consul for Canada in Greenland and from 1947 to 1948 as Chief of the Geographical Bureau. He helped found the Artic Institute of North America in 1944. From 1967 to 1976 he served as Chairman. He received a Doctor of Science degree in 1949 from the University of Bristol because of his study on Canada and Northern Canada for the Canadian Institute of International Affairs. In 1959 Trevor Lloyd became a Professor of Human Geography at McGill University. He was Chairman of the Geography Department at McGill from 1962 to 1966. In 1973 he became the Director of the McGill's Centre for Northern Research at Schefferville, Quebec. He retired from McGill in 1977. It was then that Lloyd became the first Executive Director for the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Research (ACUNS). He became Canada's leading expert on Greenland, past and present. He has written numerous scholarly articles on the North. (Taken from: "Trent Fornightly". Volume 11, Number 28, June 4, 1981.) On May 29, 1981 Trevor Lloyd received a Doctor of Laws from Trent University and therefore became one of the Trent University Honorary Graduands. He has received a number of awards (See "Who's Who in Canada". 1995) He married Joan Glassco in 1936 and they divorced in 1966. They had two children, Mona Jean and Hugh Glassco. Trevor Lloyd died in 1995.

Phyllis Logan

  • Person

Phyllis Petrie Logan was born in Toronto, April 7, 1902. In 1911, the family moved to Clarkson, Ontario. Logan was educated at the University of toronto from 1919-1923. She married Dr. Hugh David Logan in 1927. She and her husband had five children. Logan was an active participant in the community as a member of the Fortnightly Club and the Lindsay Academy Theatre. She was also President of the Lindsay Art Guild. Phyllis Logan taught at Lindsay Collegiate and Vocational School. She died in 1985.

R.D. Lloyd

  • Person

R.D. Lloyd, Toronto, was on the staff of Camp Ahmek from 1942 to 1962. In 1948 and 1949, he was assistant canoeing instructor under Ron Perry, while Perry was collecting material for "The Canoe and You". R.D. Lloyd is the son of L. Loyd, member of the Cree Tribe, Tuxis Camp. (Taken from a letter written by R.D. Lloyd to Trent University Archives on February 26, 1993 and housed in Trent University Archives donor file)

Dr. Mary Louise Northway

  • Person

Dr. Mary Louise Northway, born in 1909, was the daughter of A. Garfield Northway and Mary McKellar and the granddaughter of John Northway, founder of the Northway Company Limited and John Northway and Son Limited. Mary was educated in Toronto and graduated from the University of Toronto, (B.A. 1933, M.A. 1934, and Ph.D. 1938). Mary did her graduate work at Cambridge University in England. Dr. Northway taught psychology at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1968, and the last fifteen years of her tenure were as Supervisor of Research at the Institute of Child Study. She also earned international recognition as a pioneer in the field of Sociometry. From 1950 to 1963, she was the president of the Northway Company Limited. Among the many honours bestowed upon Dr. Northway were: Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, Honorary Life Member of the Ontario Camping Association, and an Honorary Degree from Trent University in 1979. Throughout her life, Mary was involved in camping and she believed in the value of Canadian summer camping and tripping. She was the program director of Glen Bernard Camp from 1930 to 1939 and, with Flora Morrison, was co-director of a girls' camp called Windy Pine Point, from 1941 to 1950. Dr. Mary L. Northway died in 1987. In her will she left to Trent University its largest private benefaction to be known as the Northway Bequest in memory of her father, Garfield Northway. This bequest provided permanent support towards a number of areas: Trent University Archives, Bata Library and the Canadian Studies Department. (Information taken from a plaque commemorating the dedication of the Northway Reading Room which was written by the Trent University Archivist, Bernadine Dodge.)

Ontario Natives Development Fund Inc. (Windsor, Ontario)

  • Corporate body

The Ontario Natives Development Fund Inc. was organized in 1968 through the Indian-Eskimo Association of Canada to raise and distribute money to Native organizations which were encountering difficulty in obtaining government assistance, and to educate the Canadian public about the Native situation (taken from a ONDF press release, May 21, 1970). The Windsor Committee of the ONDF was established in 1969.

Orange Lodge. Orange Hall Board (Protestant Association Trustee Board)

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Orange Lodge. Loyal Orange Lodge Victoria, No. 180

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Orange Lodge. J.W. Bell Memorial Lodge No. 1175

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William J. Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Stephen A. Otto

  • Person

Stephen Anderson Otto was an advocate of heritage conservation in Ontario. His involvements in heritage conservation included initiating the Ontario Bicentennial celebrations, and directing the Ontario Heritage Foundation. He was also a member of the Toronto Historical Board, and head of the heritage-conservation programs run by the Ontario government (taken from Toronto: No Mean City, 3rd edition, by Eric Arthur, 1986). Otto died 22 April 2018 in Toronto, Ontario.

The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada

  • Corporate body

The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada became a unit of the Active Militia of Canada by a General Order issued on April 26, 1860. They are allied with the Buffs, an East Kent Regiment in England. Active service for the Queen's Own Rifles commenced on Christmas Eve in 1864. Two companies were ordered to the Frontier (now the Canadian/United States border) in consequence of St. Alban's raid. In 1866 the Regiment received its baptism of fire at the Battle of Ridgeway. It also fought in the Red River Rebellion in 1870 and the Second Northwest Rebellion in 1885.On October 25, 1899 the Toronto quota of the first Canadian Contingent to the Boer War was despatched to the Front. In that group of men were a number of the Queen's Own Rifles. During World War I, 205 officers and 8 104 other ranks were sent from the Queen's Own Rifles before the enforcement of the Military Service Act. On February 3, 1923 the Queen's Own Association was established out of the Queen's Own Rifles Ex-Members Association which had been formed October 10, 1916 to assist, in the form of food and clothing, the men who were prisoners of war in Germany. It was also formed to consolidate and foster a strong sentiment of fraternity and good-will among the ex-members of the Regiment. At the 1923 meeting of the Association it was decided to allow members of the entire regiment to participate and not just ex-members. The objective of the new association was to bring together all men who had been, at one time or another, connected with the Regiment.

Lyceum Club and Women's Art Association of Peterborough

  • Corporate body

In September 1887, an enthusiastic group of young women artists organized an art club on the plan of the Art Students League of New York. In a studio on Yonge Street Arcade they met to work together in painting, drawing, modeling and sketching from still life and living models. No instruction was given, the object being to provide an incentive and help towards self-development, to draw out (independent of the instructor) personal resources, which are necessary to individual effort. In 1890 the Club was incorporated into the "Women's Art Club" for the purpose of creating general interest in art and encouragement of women's work, through the exchange of ideas and cooperation among its members, as well as the holding of art exhibitions and lectures. The motto chosen was that of the old Plantin Printers of Antwerp "Labore et Constantia" by Labour and Constancy. While the motto is kept in evidence, few now remember that the colours of the Association are red and white and the emblem the wild rose. In April, 1930, the Association affiliated with the Lyceum Club of London, England, and is now known as the Lyceum Club and Women's Art Association of Canada. Members are assured of a welcome in any of the International Lyceum Clubs. In March, 1905, the Women's Art Association of Toronto held its first exhibition in Peterborough. This exhibition of paintings and handicrafts was arranged by members of the Toronto association resident in Peterborough, and was such a success that it was decided to form a branch association, and on March 28, 1905, the Peterborough Branch of the Women's Art Association was organized. In December 1998, the organization voted to cease its connection with the Lyceum Club and its name became the Women’s Art Association of Canada, Peterborough Branch.

William Lloyd (Moon) Wootton

  • Person

William Lloyd (Moon) Wootton (1927-1989) was a charter inductee in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in Westminster, B.C. and a member of the Peterborough & District Sports Hall of Fame and the Owen Sound Sports Hall of Fame. He became legendary in Peterborough in the 1940s and 1950s where he played goalie, breaking records and contributing to the winning of the prestigious Mann Cup for five consecutive years. Dozens of newspaper clippings published in Peterborough, Owen Sound and Westminster attest to the fame and popularity that Wootton achieved. The fonds reflects a grassroots Canadian story and is a significant historical record of mid-20th century lacrosse in Peterborough where the sport has gained widespread recognition that continues to the present day.

Professor Robert Paehlke

  • Person

Professor Robert C. Paehlke received his B.A. at Lehigh, his M.A. at the New School for Social Research and his Ph.D. at the University of British Columbia. In 1971 he joined the Trent University Political Studies teaching staff. Also in 1971 he became the founding editor of the "Alternatives" journal produced at Trent University and now produced at the University of Waterloo. He was the department head of the Environmental and Resource Studies program from 1975 to 1977 and department head of the Political Studies program from 1982 to 1985. He has published widely in the areas of environmentalism and administration and received Canada Council Doctoral Fellowships in 1968-69 and 1969-70.

Arthur G. Racey

  • Person

Born in 1870 in Quebec, A.G. Racey attended McGill University where he developed an interest in caricature. His cartoons were first published in the Montreal Witness, and later, in the Montreal Star where he worked as cartoonist from 1899 to 1941. Racey is also recognized for his oil and water colour paintings, many of which hang in private collections throughout Canada. Racey died in Montreal on December 21, 1941.

Howard T. Pammett

  • Person

Howard T. Pammett was born in 1909 at Young's Point, Smith Township, and he grew up in Ashburnham (Peterborough East). He was educated at the local schools, including the Peterborough Normal School. During the Depression (1930's) he spent his time teaching and taking university courses in English and History. He did his masters in History at Queen's University in 1934. His thesis topic was on the Peter Robinson emigration from Ireland to Upper Canada in 1825. In 1941 he joined the federal government service under the Department of Labour. He retired in 1970. Throughout his life, Howard Pammett has written numerous articles and books relating to the economic and social history of Peterborough and the surrounding Kawartha region. He is the co-author of "Through the Years in Douro 1822-1967" and the author of "Lilies and Shamrocks: a History of the Township of Emily in the County of Victoria."

Dennis Dickens Sweeting

  • Person

Dennis Dickens Sweeting (1915-2000) was born in Calgary, Alberta. He was the second child of John Findlay Sweeting and Jessie Craven Dickens. Sweeting was a professional actor from the age of 38 and was founding director of Kawartha Summer Theatre (1964). He was producer/artistic director of Canadian Players, and president of the Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists. He also organized the Actor's Equity Association of Canada and served as reeve of Lindsay and ward of Victoria County. Sweeting received his BA from Trent University in 1980, and was recipient of the Maggie Basset Award (1988), an honorary degree from Trent University (1990), and the Order of Canada (1994).

Realistic Travels

  • Corporate body

The Realistic Travels Company was a large stereographic publishing company based in London, England. It existed from approximately 1908 to 1916 and was run by H.D. Girdwood. Realistic Travels had branch offices in Toronto, New York, Bombay and Cape Town. (Taken from: Darrah, William C. The World of Stereographs. Gettysburg: W.C. Darrah Publisher, 1977.)

Gabriel Switzer

  • Person

Gabriel Switzer was a farmer in Emily Township during the middle to late 1800's.

Chief George Paudash

  • Person

Chief George Paudash (1889-1969) was chief of the Algonquin band of Mississaugas at the Hiawatha reserve located at Rice Lake, Ontario. He was a tinsmith and an outdoors guide and served in WWI. His wife's name was Margaret (1893-1966). Chief George Paudash's son, George, served in WWII and was married to Anne Rosemary Hacker.

Elias Rendell

  • Person

Elias Rendell, son of John Rendell and brother of John Rendell, was born in ca. 1797 and lived in Shaldon, County of Devon, England. Rendell was 15 years old at the time that the apprenticeship agreement was signed.

Harold Reid

  • Person

Harold Reid, the creator of this collection is the great-great-grandson of Robert Reid, pioneer settler in Peterborough, Ontario, grandson of Robert Henry Reid and son of Frederick Henry Adolphus Reid.

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