Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

Thomas B. Collins

  • Person

Thomas B. Collins owned a general store in Millbrook, Ontario, in the late 1800's and early 1900's.

Thomas Alexander Stewart Hay family

  • Family

Thomas Alexander Stewart Hay was born in Peterborough on August 14, 1849, the son of Thomas Hay of Seggieden, Scotland, and Anna Maria Stewart. Anna Maria was the daughter of Thomas A. and Frances Stewart, pioneer settlers in Douro Township. Hay married Elise Roux, of Montreal, June 27, 1881. Hay was a civil engineer by profession. He learned a great deal from his uncle, George Stewart, who was also an engineer. Hay was a charter member of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers. He was a Mason and he accomplished much in his career, working for the Midland Railway, the Trent Canal (where he assisted in the design of the Peterborough lift lock) and the City of Peterborough, as a City Engineer. In this capacity, he designed the Smith Street (now Parkhill Road) bridge at Inverlea, and aided in parkland development in the city. Hay was the first President of the Peterborough Historical Society, the active curator of its museum, and the author of "A Short History of Peterborough," an appendix in E.S. Dunlop's edited version of Frances Stewarts' letter "Our Forest Home." Hay died on March 28, 1917, leaving his wife and two daughters Frances Isabel and Helen.

Thomas Alexander Stewart

  • Person

Thomas Alexander Stewart (1786-1847) was born in Ireland and worked for the firm of Robert Reid and Son, which manufactured linen, cotton and silk. When the company ran into financial trouble, and eventual bankruptcy, Thomas and his wife, Frances Browne Stewart (1794-1872), emigrated to Canada with their children and Thomas' brother-in-law and former business partner, Robert Reid and his family. The party of 27 set sail from Belfast Lough on June 1, 1822. Seven weeks were spent on the ship before reaching Quebec. From Quebec they travelled to Kingston, and then on to York, where Stewart and Reid were each granted 1200 acres, provided they settled in an unsurveyed township. Douro Township in Peterborough County was suggested as a promising region. On September 9, 1822, Stewart and Reid travelled to the area with surveyor Richard Birdsall, and each chose land on the Otonabee River. Thomas Stewart became a prominent and influential citizen in the area and died in 1847 from typhoid fever. Extensive biographical information on the Stewart family, plus friends, neighbours, and associates, may be found in accession [02-001]:https://www.trentu.ca/library/archives/02-001

Theodore Thorne Hamilton family

  • Family

The Theodore Thorne Hamilton family is associated with the earliest settlement of the Bobcaygeon area and later relocation to western Canada, where Theodore Thorne Hamilton was a telegraph operator with the Canadian National Railway. Hamilton was born 10 April 1890 in Bobcaygeon and died 3 August 1959. While in western Canada, he resided in Eudako, British Columbia.

The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada

  • Corporate body

The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada became a unit of the Active Militia of Canada by a General Order issued on April 26, 1860. They are allied with the Buffs, an East Kent Regiment in England. Active service for the Queen's Own Rifles commenced on Christmas Eve in 1864. Two companies were ordered to the Frontier (now the Canadian/United States border) in consequence of St. Alban's raid. In 1866 the Regiment received its baptism of fire at the Battle of Ridgeway. It also fought in the Red River Rebellion in 1870 and the Second Northwest Rebellion in 1885.On October 25, 1899 the Toronto quota of the first Canadian Contingent to the Boer War was despatched to the Front. In that group of men were a number of the Queen's Own Rifles. During World War I, 205 officers and 8 104 other ranks were sent from the Queen's Own Rifles before the enforcement of the Military Service Act. On February 3, 1923 the Queen's Own Association was established out of the Queen's Own Rifles Ex-Members Association which had been formed October 10, 1916 to assist, in the form of food and clothing, the men who were prisoners of war in Germany. It was also formed to consolidate and foster a strong sentiment of fraternity and good-will among the ex-members of the Regiment. At the 1923 meeting of the Association it was decided to allow members of the entire regiment to participate and not just ex-members. The objective of the new association was to bring together all men who had been, at one time or another, connected with the Regiment.

The Peterborough Ecology Strategy

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Ecology Strategy is a community-initiated project to identify and describe green space and natural areas in and around the City of Peterborough, Ontario, with the aim of developing strategies and policies for their protection (taken from the Report). The idea for doing an inventory of the City's green space was initiated by Professor John Marsh, Trent University. Over time the Peterborough Field Naturalists became involved, and later the Planning Division and the Parks and Forestry Division of the City of Peterborough. The draft interim report was submitted by project coordinator Jean Greig to the Ecology Strategy Steering Committee in 1991.

The Old Doctor / C.P. Traill. -- 1st ed. -- Edited by Jean Murray Cole. -- Peterborough : Hutchison House Museum

  • Corporate body

Catharine Parr Traill was born in Kent near London, England 9 January 1802 as Catharine Parr Strickland. She was the fifth child of Thomas and Elizabeth Strickland. She was sister to Eliza, Jane Margaret, Susanna (later Susanna Moodie), Samuel and Agnes. In 1832 she married Lt. Thomas Traill. She emigrated with her husband to Upper Canada when the opportunity provided itself and they settled near the Otonabee River near Peterborough, Upper Canada. Together they had nine children. Catharine wrote a number of works on pioneer life in Upper Canada such as The Backwoods of Canada (1834), Canadian Crusoes (1853), The Female Emigrants Guide (1854), Canadian Wild Flowers (1868) and Studies of Plant Life in Canada (1885). She also kept a journal and in it she wrote down ideas and sketches for future writings. "The Old Doctor" (1985) was probably written between 1835 and 1840 when John Hutchison, a native of Kirkcaldy, Scotland, was practising medicine in Peterborough, Upper Canada. Before emigrating Catharine had published a number of children's books and stories in England. Catharine Parr Traill died on August 29, 1899. (Taken from: Forest and Other Gleanings. Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1994.)

The Indian wild rice harvest at Rice Lake

  • Corporate body

Rice Lake was formed by glacial activity. For the most part hunting and fur trade were the principal trades in the area. It was not until the early 1800's that the Mississauga natives started to harvest wild rice on the lake. Wild rice (called men-o-min) was used as a trade material and grew so thick on the lake that the harvesters had to back their canoe's out by the same channel they had made in the rice when they entered the rice field. Many of the rice beds were drowned when the Trent Canal was built. A hurricane in 1928 also did considerable damage to the rice fields remaining. By the 1950's rice could only be located in a few creeks near the shore and since then carp have destroyed the roots. (Taken from: Martin, Norma, Donna S. McGillis and Catherine Milne. Gore's Landing and the Rice Lake Plains. Cobourg: Haynes Printing, 1986.)

The Cole Theatre

  • Family

Both Jean Murray Cole and Alfred O.C. Cole are, and were, avid researchers and historians. Jean Murray Cole was born in 1927. She and Alfred have shared the editorialship of a number of books including "The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough" which was published in 1975 and "Kawartha Heritage" in 1981. Jean Murray Cole was a former journalist and has published a number of historical texts concerning Peterborough and area such as "The Loon Calls: A History of the Township of Chandos". She has also published a book "Exile in Wilderness", a biography of the Hudson's Bay Company Chief Factor Archibald McDonald. Jean is an active member of the Friends of the Bata Library and Jean has been a long-standing member of the Peterborough Historical Society. (Taken from: "The Loon Calls" and) Alfred O. Cooper Cole was born in 1925 as the youngest son of Dr. C.E. Cooper Cole and Sarah Renwick Tuckett. He had 3 brothers and 1 sister. Alfred O.C. Cole has played a major role in the life and history of Trent University. He was the Registrar of the University from 1966 to 1987 and a member of the Department of History. He was an RCAF pilot during World War II, a political reporter for the Toronto "Daily Star" and "Globe and Mail" and he served as a executive assistant in the Ontario Ministry of Public Works at Queen's Park in Toronto. He also has written a number of articles and books such as "A Victorian Snapshot" in 1992 and "Trent The Making of a University, 1957-1987" also published in 1992. Alfred O.C. Cole died October 20, 1996. (Taken from: "The Peterborough Examiner." October 22, 1996. p. 2a) Together Jean and Alfred had six children of which one has followed into their literary footsteps.

The Canadian Canoe Museum

  • Corporate body

The Canadian Canoe Museum is a unique national heritage centre that explores the canoe’s enduring significance to the peoples of Canada, through an exceptional collection of canoes, kayaks and paddled watercraft. We’re an engaging, family-friendly museum with more than 100 canoes and kayaks on display. Visitors will enjoy interactive, hands-on galleries, a scavenger hunt, model canoe building and puppet theatre for children. Through inclusive, memorable and engaging exhibits and programs we share the art, culture, heritage and spirit of paddled watercraft with our communities.

Founded on a collection of the late Professor Kirk Wipper, and established in Peterborough, Ontario, in 1997, the museum’s holdings now number more than 600 canoes, kayaks and paddled watercraft. Together they span the country from coast to coast to coast and represent many of the major watercraft traditions of Canada.

The museum’s artifacts range from the great dugouts of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest to the singular bark canoes of the Beothuk of Newfoundland; from the skin-on-frame kayaks of northern peoples from Baffin Island in the east to the Mackenzie River Delta in the northwest to the all-wood and canvas-covered craft manufactured by companies with names like Herald, Peterborough, Chestnut, Lakefield and Canadian. Over the years paddled watercraft from as far away as Paraguay and the Amazon have helped the Museum expand its reach and scope to include International examples.

Temagami (Ontario)

  • Corporate body

The Community of Temagami (formerly Timagami) in the geographic township of Strathy is located at the tip of the Northeast Arm of Lake Temagami about 60 miles north of North Bay. Prior to the arrival of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway (now Ontario Northland) the area was primarily an Indian settlement. Its inhabitants were trading at one of the Hudson's Bay Company's outposts, first situated on the south shore of Temagami Island, and moved in the 1870s to Bear Island. By the mid 1900s Temagami had become the centre of a popular tourist region with daily boat and seaplane service in the summer months to remote resorts on the lake. About that time copper was discovered on some of the lake's islands and by the late 1960s a large iron mining complex was taking shape a few miles to the north of Temagami. Today, Temagami is best known as a site of protest against the forestry industry. (Taken partially from: Mika, Nick and Helma. Places in Ontario. Belleville: Mika Publishing Company,1983.)

Ted Brock

  • Person

Ted Brock was Chair of the Camp Tonakela Association.

Susanna Moodie

  • Person

Susanna Moodie (nee Strickland), born December 6, 1803 at Bungay, England, was the youngest daughter of Thomas Strickland and Elizabeth Homer. The Strickland's were a literary family of whom Catharine Parr Traill and Samuel Strickland are best known in Canada, as well as their sister Susanna Moodie. Susanna began to seriously pursue her literary career in 1818, after the death of her father. In 1831, Susanna moved to London, England were she became associated with the Anti-Slavery Society. For the society she wrote two antislavery tracts, "The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave" (1831) and "Negro Slavery Described by a Negro" (1831). While working in London, she met her future husband John Wedderburn Dunbar Moodie. They were wed April 4, 1831. In July 1832, Susanna, John, and their eldest child emigrated to the Cobourg region of Upper Canada. After two unsuccessful attempts at farming in this area, the Moodie family moved to Belleville in 1840. In Belleville, Susanna wrote and published a number of works, primarily romantic fiction. From 1847 to 1848, both Susanna and her husband edited and wrote for Victoria Magazine. In 1852, she published Roughing it in the Bush which is her best known literary work. The books to follow included Life in the Clearings, published in 1853, and Flora Lyndsay, published in 1854. Susanna Moodie lived in Belleville until the death of her husband in 1869. She then moved to the Toronto area where she continued to live until her death, April 8, 1885.

Susan Neale

  • Person

Susan Jane Neale is the daughter of Colin Neale and Patricia Anne Turvey. She has two siblings, Andrew and Christina, and lives in Peterborough, Ontario with her husband Paul Joseph Hulsmans. Between 1982 and 1994, Neale worked as an archaeologist in England, Ontario, and Nunavut and from 1995 to 2001 at Fleming College as a member of faculty. Since the year 2000, she has served as Museum Director at Peterborough Museum and Archives and from 2001 to the present, also as Research Associate in Trent University’s Anthropology Graduate Program. Neale earned a Master’s degree in the Department of Anthropology at Trent University in 1985. She has served on several committees and boards at local and provincial levels and has published and presented a number of papers pertaining to archaeology, to museum management and renewal, and to emergency preparedness and recovery from a museum perspective.

Susan Burnham Greeley

  • Person

Susan Burnham Greeley (1806-1904) was the daughter of Aaron Greeley, a surveyor and cousin of Zacheous Burnham, and Margaret Rogers. She was born in Haldimand Township, about two miles from Grafton, Ontario. Greeley was a school teacher, and operated a Sunday School from her home for over eighty years. She was a member of the Colborne Presbyterian church. Greeley died in 1904 and is buried at Grafton Presbyterian cemetery.

Strickland family

  • Family

The Strickland family originated in England at Light Hall, Colton-in-Furness as yeoman farmers and their ancestry can be traced back to the fourteenth century. They were tenants of the Abbey of Furness until the dissolution of the monasteries during the lifetime of Henry VIII. At this time they became landowners and later started to move out of the area to London and other environs. Samuel Strickland (1804-1867) was the first of the Stricklands to come to Canada in 1825. He first spent time in Newcastle District and then later cleared some property for a farm in Otonabee Township. He later sold his farm and purchased land in Douro and there he began clearing land at the present site of Lakefield. His sisters, Catharine Parr (Traill) and Susanna (Moodie) eventually followed him to Canada and settled near him.

Stratford Festival

  • Corporate body

The Stratford Festival is an internationally-acclaimed drama festival. It opened in July 1953 in a tent theatre beside the Avon River in Stratford, Ontario. Currently the Festival has three stages, and over 100 actors in its acting corps. Stratford Festival has gained a reputation as the leading classical theatre in North America.

Stoney Lake: American Canoe Association

  • Corporate body

The American Canoe Association was founded in 1880 in the United States and spread rapidly throughout North America. During the third year of its organization the American Canoe Club held its annual meeting and regatta at Juniper Point on Stoney Lake north of Peterborough.

Stirling, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Stinson family

  • Family

Thomas H. Stinson was born February 26, 1883, at Minden, Ontario, the son of T. Stinson and Victoria Henderson. He was educated at Minden Public School, Lindsay Collegiate, University of Toronto, and Osgoode Hall. He married Ella E. Robson, daughter of Lindsay lawyer William Robson, on July 14, 1910. Stinson was a lawyer and conservative politician. He was the Crown Attorney for Victoria and Haliburton Counties from 1913 to 1921; the solicitor for the two counties, as well as the town of Lindsay; Governor of Ross Memorial Hospital, Lindsay, Ontario; Director (later President) of Victoria and Grey Trust Company; Director of Cole Manufacturing Company; and Director of Penny Bank of Ontario. In his political career, he was elected M.P. for Victoria riding in the general elections of 1925, 1926, and 1930. It is unknown as to when he passed away.

Stewart family

  • Family

Several generations of the Stewart family have lived in the Peterborough area. Thomas A. Stewart and his wife, Frances, were prominent and influential early citizens of Peterborough. Extensive biographical information on the Stewart family, plus friends, neighbours, and associates, may be found in 02-001.

Stevens, Henry Herbert

  • Person

Henry Herbert Stevens (Harry) was born December 8, 1878 in Bristol, England. In 1887 he and his father, two older brothers and a sister emigrated to Peterborough, Canada. In 1894 the family moved to Vancouver in British Columbia. A short time after this Harry met and married Gertrude Glover. Together they had 5 children: 2 boys; Francis and Douglas, and 3 girls; Majorie, Sylvia and Patricia. H.H. Stevens served with the American Army in the Boxer Rebellion. When he returned to Vancouver he went into the grocery, real estate and insurance businesses. He was elected, in 1911, to the House of Commons, for Vancouver, and remained there until 1930. He represented East Kooteney from 1930 to 1940. He held the positions of Minister of Trade (Meighan administration) in 1921 and Minister of Trade and Commerce (Bennet administration) from 1930 to 1934. He was Chairman of the Price-Spreads Commission in 1934. Due to a disagreement, with Cabinet about the findings of the commission, H.H. Stevens resigned his position and established the Reconstruction Party. In 1938 he joined the Conservative Party. H.H. Stevens was President of the Vancouver Board of Trade from 1952 to 1953. He died June 14, 1973 in Vancouver, British Columbia. (Taken from: The Macmillan Dictionary of Canadian Biography. 4th ed. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1978.)

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