Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

James K. Bartleman

  • Person

The Honourable James K. Bartleman was born in Orillia, Ontario in 1939. From 1966 to 2002, he served as a diplomat in Canada’s foreign service and, from 2002 to 2007, as Ontario’s 27th Lieutenant Governor. Mr. Bartleman is a member of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation and was Ontario’s first Aboriginal vice regal representative, devoting much of his time to promoting literacy among Indigenous children and combating the stigma associated with mental illness. He is an author, having written five books of non-fiction, including two which won the Joseph Brant award on multicultural history, and two novels with social justice themes relating to the condition of Indigenous people. Titles include Out of Muskoka (2002); On six continents: a life in Canada’s foreign service, 1966-2002 (2004); Rollercoaster: my hectic years as Jean Chretien’s diplomatic advisor, 1994-1998 (2005); As long as the rivers flow (2011); and The redemption of Oscar Wolf (2013). Citing his connection to the Peterborough area and his recognition of Trent University’s “outstanding native studies program,” Mr. Bartleman offered his papers to Trent University Archives in 2013. (Taken from correspondence received from The Honourable James K. Bartleman, 2013).

Paul James Delaney

  • Person

Paul James Delaney was born in 1944 and lived at Gore's Landing, Lakefield and Midland. He was a student at Trent University from 1964 to 1968 and is listed in the first student register. A member of Trent University’s first graduating class, Delaney became a teacher and went on to win numerous awards, including the Alumni Spirit of Trent Award, TVOntario Teacher of the Year, Pope’s Medal, YMCA Peace Medal, and the Governor General’s Award for Excellence in Teaching History. He was the first Director of Ste. Marie Among the Hurons and taught summer courses in India and Sierra Leone. “Uncle Paul”, as he became known to Trent University's international students, served as Alumnus-in-Residence at Trent, volunteered his time with the Trent International Program, and became a mentor to hundreds of Trent students. Delaney died in 2012. (Taken in part from a March 1, 2013 posting titled "Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Paul Delaney" located on the Trent University web site).

Ivan Bateman

  • Person

Ivan Bateman is a retired businessman and family historian.

Bateson family

  • Family

The Bateson family consisted of George who married Mary (?) and lived in Penetanguishene; Isaac Newton who married Margaret (?) and lived in Dowagiac, Michigan in the United States; Jane who married a Robert Russell (farmer) and lived in Scotland County, Missouri in the United States; Eliza who married James Morrison and lived in Lindsay, Ontario; Margaret who married James Marshall (Carriage-maker) and lived in the village of Cannington, Ontario; Letitia who married William Henry McCardle (labourer) and lived in Midland, Ontario; Mary Eleanor who married Thomas Richardson (blacksmith) and also lived in Midland, Ontario; and William who married Harriet (?) and lived in Bailieboro, Ontario. These nine people were children of Isaac (died January 22, 1880) and Ellen (died September 13, 1900) Bateson of Cavan Township. William Bateson died January 28, 1930. It is unknown who Thomas and John Bateson are except that they were executers of Isaac Bateson's Last Will and Testatment.

Baulch family

  • Family

The Baulch family were tailors who lived in Hampton, Ontario and Port Hope, Ontario. Members of the family include Joseph H. and his wife Laura, Henry N., R. Baulch, and Will Baulch, Rochester, New York.

C. Beale

  • Person

C. Beale was a retired military officer who settled in the Peterborough area at the end of the 1830s.

Joyce Beaton

  • Person

Joyce Beaton ([1932?]- ) was co-founder of Early Canadian Life, a Canadian heritage and history magazine, along with business partner, Janice Johnston. The magazine was published from 1976 to 1980 and Beaton was its editor. She also wrote for Milton, Ontario's weekly newspaper, Canadian Champion and freelanced for an arts and crafts publication. She has written articles for the Toronto Star and Hamilton Spectator and has published books, including When Lightning Strikes... The Life of Evelyn M. Kennedy 1890-1985. Beaton lives in Baysville, Ontario.

Beavermead Park

  • Corporate body

Beavermead Park is located on the east shore of Little Lake, Peterborough, Ontario, on land that was once owned by Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald.

Beaverton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Frank Beazer

  • Person

Frank C. Beazer was born in Chippenham, England. He left Chippenham in 1912 and worked in Ifracombe, Eastbourne, London and Bath in England. He was a ship's steward on two trips to East Africa before he became a missionary to the Church of England Camp Mission. The first place he went to as a missionary was the diocese of Caribou in British Columbia. He enlisted in Chapleau, Ontario, in the 227 B Company, on July 26, 1916 and travelled to France with the 54th Battalion where he became assistant to the regimental chaplain. In 1919 he attended Wycliffe College at the University of Toronto and received his ordination on St. Georges Day in 1922 in the Cathedral in Cochrane, Ontario. He resided at Kapuskasing for twelve years. In Kapuskasing he helped to build his church and house. He was also an assistant scoutmaster for the Boy Scouts of Canada in Kapuskasing. In 1927 he married Gertrude Hudson of Toronto. He was the pastor for Oxford Mills, Carrying Place and St. Paul's Anglican Church in Roslin, Ontario; Christ Anglican Church in Thomasburg, Ontario and St. Luke's Anglican Church in Peterborough, Ontario. In 1958 Reverend Beazer and his wife visited his two brothers in Chippenham, England. While they were there they were invited to have cocktails with the High Commissioner of Canada George Drew and his wife. Frank was a member of the Masonic Lodge.

Alvin Bee

  • Person

Alvin Bee was a farmer on Concession 1, Lots 26, 27, 28 in Hope Township, Douro County, in the early 1900s.

John Bee

  • Person

John Bee owned Lot 16, Concession 1 in Cavan Township in the 1850's. His family owned and operated a grist and saw mill on the Ganaraska River near Port Hope from the 1850's onwards. John was also a cobbler from 1847 onwards. Hiram Bee had a store and at some point the Bees married into the Austin family.

John E. Belcher

  • Person

John E. Belcher was an architect, civil engineer, and a surveyor who lived in the Peterborough region at the turn of the century. He was involved in the construction of the Chemong Floating Bridge, the Peterborough Public Library, the Bradburn Opera House, the Wallis memorial in St. John's Church, the Canadian General Electric Company and the Anglican Christ Church in Bobcaygeon, Ontario.

Robert Bell

  • Person

Robert Bell was a Provincial Land Surveyor working in Canada West during the late 1840's. He was responsible for the survey of Bell's Line, a road which was never constructed, which was to have run westward through the northern portions of Peterborough and Hastings Counties, from the Madawaska River to Bracebridge. The Peterson Road, which was surveyed and constructed a few years later, eight miles south of and parallel to the Bell's Line survey, was considered to be a more suitable route for east-west travel in the region. It is thought that Bell was born in Ireland in 1821 and that he later emigrated with his parents to New York. In 1843, Bell obtained land in Kemptville, Canada West, and worked in and around Bytown (Ottawa) for three years. In 1847, he was instructed to begin the Bell's Line survey. Upon the completion of the survey in September 1848, Bell retired from surveying; and the following year, he purchased an Ottawa newspaper which was to become the Ottawa Citizen. He died in 1873 at the age of 52.

Belleville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Sidney Bellingham

  • Person

Sydney Bellingham was born in 1808 in Castlebellingham Ireland and briefly lived in Douro Township, Upper Canada. In the summer of 1824, Bellingham arrived at the homestead of Thomas and Frances Stewart. Thomas was his uncle; the brother of Sydney's mother Elizabeth Jane (or Jane Elizabeth) Stewart Bellingham. Sydney remained in Douro as a farm hand until 1827. He then obtained employment in Montreal, moved there and spent the majority of his life there until 1878. He was a merchant and politician in Quebec. He died in 1900 back in Castlebellingham which he had inherited.

Belmont municipal telephone system

  • Corporate body

The Belmont Municipal Telephone System began operation in 1922 in Havelock, Belmont Township, Ontario. This new system preceeded the Bell Telephone Company and the Havelock-Cordova Telephone Company in Belmont Township. It served subscribers for 33 years. In 1953, the Bell Telephone Company entered into negotiations with the Belmont Municipal System to re-acquire the system.

Benson Mills

  • Corporate body

Benson Mills was a large grist mill which was owned and operated by John Robinson Benson, husband of Catherine Evans Lee. He purchased the mill from Adam Scott. J.R. Benson was one of ten children in a family that settled in Peterborough.

John Bertram & Sons

  • Corporate body

John Bertram & Sons was a business in Dundas, Ontario in the early Twentieth Century.

Better Bait Company

  • Corporate body

The Better Bait Company was situated at 631 Lundy's Lane in Peterborough, Ontario. The company claimed to be the manufacturers of quality fishing tackle. The owner and operator was Perce Dyer, a Peterborough resident in the 1940s.

Beta Sigma Phi (Peterborough, Ontario)

  • Corporate body

Founded in 1931, Beta Sigma Phi is an international women's organization that focuses on stimulating personal growth and development of its members through cultural and social programs and through service to others. Members volunteer for such activities as blood donor clinics, daffodil day, and meals on wheels. The organization supports various charities. Beta Sigma Phi was established in Peterborough in 1944.

Janet P. Bews

  • Person

Janet P. Bews (1938-2000) was a Professor in the Ancient History and Classics Department, Trent University, from 1966 to 1999. She received her BA from Queen's and her MA and Ph.D. from Royal Holloway College, London. Her scholarly interests included Tacitus and Vergil, Julian of Norwich, Hildegard of Bingen, Dante, C.S. Lewis, Gilgamesh, and Charles Williams. Bews was Senior Don (1966) and Senior Tutor (1982, 1986) at Traill College, and was Chair of the Classics Department (1974-1978). Bews retired from Trent University in 1999 and was awarded Professor Emeritus at that time. She died on August 27th, 2000.

Hazel Bird

  • Person

Hazel Bird (1920-2009) was a recognized naturalist known especially for her work in restoring the bluebird population of Northumberland County. Born in Northumberland County, Bird served in World War II where she met her husband, Tom Bird. The couple resided in Harwood, Ontario and had seven children; in the 1950s Tom Bird died due to a boating accident. In the 1960s, Hazel Bird initiated the Eastern Bluebird restoration project in Northumberland County and continued to coordinate and lead this project for almost 40 years; with the help of volunteers, “The Bluebird Lady,” as she was sometimes referred to, erected, monitored, and recorded information about the bird boxes until an accident in 2004 prevented her from doing so and resulted in the termination of the project. Bird was involved in many naturalist organizations in Ontario including the Ontario Outdoors Educator’s Council, The Willow Beach Field Naturalists and the Willow Beach Young Naturalists. She also taught classes, first as a volunteer, and then as a paid employee at the Laurie Lawson Outdoor Education Centre in Cobourg and was recognized for her work in 1996 receiving the Ontario Eastern Bluebird Society Conservation Award. In that same year it was announced by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife of Canada that the Eastern Bluebird, which had been designated as a “rare bird” since 1984, was no longer considered a species at risk. Bird died 1 February 2009. In 2012 the Nature Conservancy of Canada designated the Hazel Bird Nature Reserve in Ontario’s Rice Lake Plains in her honour.

Margaret Love Bird

  • Person

Margaret Love was born September 15, 1819 in Dublin, Ireland to Michael Love and Margaret McGowan. In 1819 the family left for Newfoundland where Margaret's father had been posted. In 1824 her father died and the family returned to Ireland. Her mother died in 1845. At this point Margaret's sister Ann, who was married and living in Canada, sent money to Margaret to emigrate to Canada. During her first year in Canada Margaret worked out in service to other families. On July 10, 1846 she married Robert Bird. Like other pioneers they did much of the work themselves. She died while she was in her nineties.

Birdsall Collection of Bookbinders' Finishing Tools / Emrys Evans & Rachel Grover

  • Corporate body

The Birdsall collection of bookbinders' finishing tools was acquired by the Rare Books Department at the University of Toronto in 1968. The Birdsall collection was started when William Birdsall purchased the bookbinding business of John Lacy and Son in Northampton, England, in 1792. The new establishment consisted of a bindery, a book store, a circulating library, a post office and insurance and banking were transacted on the side. William brought his sons, James and Robert, into the business in 1823 and by 1826 James was the sole owner since his brother and father had both died. In the 1840's Anthony, a great-nephew of the founder William, bought the business and his son Richard entered the business in 1857. Anthony died in 1893 and Richard continued the business under the name of Birdsall & Son. The firm became a private company after 1915 when the descendants of Anthony and Richard took over the firm. Each successive generation expanded on the collection of tools and styles of bookbinding with developing interests in preservation, restoration and the history of books and bookbinding. The University of Toronto acquired the collection when the last member of the Birdsall firm died leaving behind the firm's vast collection of bookbinding tools and paperwork. (Taken from: Evans, Emrys and Rachel Grover. Birdsall Collection of Bookbinders' Finishing Tools. Toronto: Department of Rare Books & Special Collections, 1972.)

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