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People, Organizations, and Families

Peterborough Teachers' College

  • Corporate body

The first normal school for the training of elementary school teachers opened in Toronto in 1847. In 1850 a system of township model schools was established. They were specially designated elementary schools where teachers or potential teachers could observe existing practice under supervision. The successful candidates received Third Class Certificates valid for three years. In 1880 there were forty-seven model schools. Candidates were awarded First or Second Class Certificates after attendance at normal school. At times there were two year courses at normal schools. Model schools were abolished in 1924 and with them the Third Class Certificate. In 1936 the Second Class Certificate was discontinued except at the Ottawa Normal School. In 1874 the Ottawa Normal School was established and in 1900 the London Normal School. In 1908 normal schools were opened in Hamilton, Peterborough, and Stratford. Peterborough Normal School was officially opened on September 15, 1908 and operated until the late 1960's. Several hundred teachers were trained there over the years of operation. The first principal was Duncan Walker. In 1973 the Peterborough Teachers' College (formerly the Peterborough Normal School) closed its doors and the staff moved to the Faculty of Education, Queen's University.

Keith Walden

  • Person

Professor Keith Walden was born in Montreal, Quebec. From 1966 to 1970 he was an undergraduate student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. He also received his Master's degree (1971) and Doctorate degree (1981) from Queen's University. Professor Walden joined the History Department of Trent University in 1977. His major historical research interest has been in the area of popular culture, particularly myth and symbolism. Professor Walden served for several years, until August 1990, as an editor of the journal Ontario History, and has published several articles and books. His books include Isaac Brock, man and myth: a study of the militia myth of the War of 1812 in Upper Canada, 1812-1912, 1971; The symbol and myth of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in some British, American and English Canadian popular literature, 1873-1973, 1980; Visions of order, 1982; Becoming modern in Toronto: the Industrial Exhibition and the shaping of a late Victorian culture, 1997; and The papers of Harry Cassidy and Beatrice Pearce: the courtship years, 1917-1925, 2009.

Waddell family

  • Family

Robert Waddell and Hugh Waddell were brothers who were both businessmen in Durham County in the middle to late 1800's and the early 1900's. Robert Waddell resided in Balieboro and Hugh Waddell lived in Millbrook, Ontario.

Thomas W. Poole

  • Person

Thomas Wesley Poole (1831-1905), physician and journalist, was educated at Victoria University and received his M.D. in 1856. He practised medicine in Norwood, Canada West; but in 1864 he moved to Peterborough, and became the editor of the Peterborough "Weekly Review". Later he went back to the practice of medicine and practised in Lindsay, Ontario. He died in Lindsay on August 27, 1905. T.W. Poole was the author of "A sketch of the early settlement and subsequent progress of the town of Peterborough. 1867"

William Piercy

  • Person

William Piercy was a member of the Royal Air Force during World War II.

Shining Waters Presbyterial United Church Women

  • Corporate body

Shining Waters Presbyterial UCW (United Church Women) is a Peterborough, Ontario, organization. Prior to 2013, it was known as Peterborough UCW Presbyterial. Shining Waters Presbyterial UCW is part of a larger organization, United Church Women, formally established in 1962 through the amalgamation of two United Church women’s groups, the Woman’s Association and the Woman’s Missionary Society. As stated in Voices of United Church Women, 1962-2002, the UCW’s purpose is “to unite the women of the congregation for the total mission of the church and to provide a medium through which we may express our loyalty and devotion to Jesus Christ in Christian witness, study, fellowship and service.” (p.v)

Deryck M. Schreuder

  • Person

Deryck M. Schreuder, born in 1942, is a Professor of History who received his Ph.D. from Oxford University. He joined Trent University's History Department in 1970 as an associate professor and he became the Chairman of the Department in 1978. He retained this position until 1981, when he left Trent University. He is the author of several books including "Gladstone and Kruger: Liberal Government and Colonial `Home Rule' 1880-1885", 1969 and "The Scamble for Southern Africa, 1877-1895: The Politics of Partition Reappraised."

Margaret Scott

  • Person

Margaret Jane Scott (Maggie) was born in 1881 at Fitzroy in Carleton County, Ontario. She and her twin sister Ida were born to Annie Knox and Archibald Scott. She and her sister were educated at the Lindsay Model School and the Toronto Normal School. Both girls were teachers and taught for a time between the Lindsay and Toronto schools. Before the family lived in Omemee, they had resided at Perth, near Ottawa, Ontario. Margaret died in 1905.

Betty Lynn Schwab

  • Person

Betty Lynn Viney (now Schwab), formerly of Kenora, Ontario, was a student at Trent University from 1965 to 1969. When Viney arrived at Trent’s Catharine Parr Traill College in 1965, the residence rooms were not yet ready; she lived with Professor Sandeman and his family until the rooms were completed. Viney is married to Robert Schwab and lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

Harold R. Scott

  • Person

Harold R. Scott was appointed Minister of Lands and Forests for Ontario on October 19, 1948. He was made a member of the Executive Council of the province of Ontario the following year.

Peppermint and Abraxas Press

  • Corporate body

Peppermint and Abraxas Press are privately owned by Richard Miller and operated out of Toronto. Peppermint Press was established in 1973 as the printer's private publishing company (Taken from: Kotin, David B. "Reader, Lover of Books." Toronto: University of Toronto, 1981.) and Abraxas Press was established in 1978. Private printing presses in Canada are usually Canadian-owned, owner-managed and limited to an annual list of one to ten titles per year, receptive to new writers, rarely profit-making and often subsidized by government grants. These small private presses often make contributions to the advancement of new literary work and to Canadian cultural life. (Taken from: "Literary Presses in Canada, 1975-1985: A Checklist and Bibliography." Halifax: Dalhousie University, 1988.) Some publications printed by Peppermint include "Pocket Pool: Poems and Parables" by David Berry in 1975; "The Lavender Nightingale" by Catherine M. Buckaway in 1978 and "Stories of the Witch Queen" by Gena K. Gorrell in 1985. Abraxas Press has published a number of broadsides and helped to publish "The Lavender Nightingale".

Progressive Conservative Association of Ontario

  • Corporate body

The Progressive Conservative Association of Ontario was developed to provide a support network for Progressive Conservative MP's and candidates in Ontario ridings. Each riding has its own association to address concerns and draft policies that can be presented by MP's in the government.

John E. Proctor

  • Person

John Edward Proctor was a resident of Brighton, Ontario involved in the lumbering trade in 1869. He was responsible for building and equipping the large schooner "E.R.C. Proctor" and the "Minnie Proctor". J.E. also had a grain elevator and dock which were in use until 1895. He also operated sawmills. (Taken from: "Centennial of the Incorporation of the Village of Brighton, 1859-1959." Brighton: Centennial Book Committee, 1959.)

S.C. Shaw

  • Person

S.C. Shaw was an artist who painted in the Peterborough region in the early 1940's.

Wallis family

  • Family

(Biographical information copied from Trent University Archives newsletter "Archives News", Issue Number 48, January 2014: "The Wallis Family" by Janice Millard).

"The link between the two [Wallis family and Forbes family] is Louisa Forbes who became Mrs. James Wallis. Louisa was the mother of well-known Peterborough-born artist and sculptor Katherine Wallis and Louisa’s father was Capt. Robert Miller/Millar Forbes.

Capt. Robert Miller Forbes had a distinguished career in the British Navy. It was, however, marred by an incident in 1798. Robert caused his ship commander, Capt. Lord Henry Paulet, later Earl St. Vincent, to be court martialled. Paulet apparently struck the then Lieutenant Forbes while Forbes was on duty on their ship – the Thalia. Paulet lost the case - but soon after he was given clemency, re-instated, and in 1819 became a Vice-Admiral. Robert Miller did not fare as well. In a transcribed letter he says that “he became the object of the most cruel and vindictive persecution… that has proved a barrier to his professional progress thro’ the mis-representations of that distinguished officer.”

After the Napoleonic Wars Robert Forbes, along with a number of ex-British military personnel, took their families and settled in France. Robert’s first child, Louisa, was born in Avranches, France. There is a watercolour in our new donation of the Church where Louisa was christened. It is likely by Katherine Wallis. The Forbes family moved around in Europe and sons were born in St. Servan Sur Merin Brittany, France. Finally the family moved to Peterborough.

Robert Forbes had an even more well-known brother – Charles John Forbes. Charles was in both the British Navy and the British Army. While in the Navy, Charles was present at the Battle of the Nile (also called the Battle of Aboukir) where Nelson defeated the French Navy. Another person at Aboukir was Charles Rubidge. Perhaps Charles Forbes and Charles Rubidge reminisced together about old battles.

While in the British Army, Charles Forbes was present for the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Our donation contains a letter written 29 Jan. 1815 on board H.M.S. Alceste, off Cat Island (near New Orleans), and sent to James Cobb, Secretary, East India Company (a cousin). In the letter Charles says that the information given to the Admiral was “fallacious” and that unlike what they had been led to believe, no “settlers of Louisiana and the Floridas” flocked to join the British cause and hence they had insufficient troops for the encounter with the Americans. It’s interesting to note that even by the end of January, Charles did not know that a treaty to end the War had been signed.

Charles had two separate enlistment periods with the British Army. Like his brother, he retired when the Napoleonic Wars were over and lived in Europe, but a few years later he re-enlisted in the Army. In 1824 he worked for the Commissariat in Nova Scotia and in 1825 he went to Montreal and stayed for 8 years. He was then posted to Jamaica and, like many Europeans who lived in the tropics, became ill. He briefly to went to England and then finally retired at half pay back in Quebec.

While posted in Quebec he acted as Commissary General for the Army and ensured there were supplies for the engineers and workers who were building canals in the Montreal region. While he was there he purchased land in the village of Carillon, on the Ottawa River just south of Lachute, Quebec, in what is now the Argenteuil Region of Quebec.

There he built a wonderful house called “Bellevue”. In our newly acquired scrapbook of Louisa Forbes there is a sketch of that house. Charles was known far and wide for his hospitality and many important people would visit him – including the Governors General.

Another well-known owner of land in the area was Sidney Robert Bellingham - nephew of Thomas A. Stewart. Sidney was very interested in politics and played a role in the 1837 rebellion – as did the British veteran Charles John Forbes."

Warkworth Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Nancy Sherouse

  • Person

Nancy Sherouse (1929-1999) was the daughter of Harry and Vivien Ratcliffe of Toronto. Sherouse joined Trent University in 1969 as assistant to Traill College's first principal. Two years later, she became principal and held that position until 1982 when she became full time director of staff relations (later renamed human resources). After her retirement in 1992, Sherouse served as Chair on the Board of Governors at Five Counties Children's Centre in Peterborough. She received an eminent service award from Trent University in 1992.

Paul S.B. Wilson

  • Person

Paul S.B. Wilson was born in England in 1939. He held the position of Director of Athletics at Trent University from 1966 until his retirement in 2002, and served as Town Ward for the City of Peterborough from 1985 to 1997. He is a strong and vocal supporter of Trent and the City of Peterborough, and is an athlete and sports leader, widely known for his involvement in rugby and squash. Wilson served on the Board of Governors at Trent University and on several athletic associations at various levels throughout Canada, and is the recipient of Trent's Symons Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Board of Governors Eminent Service Award. He is also an inductee of the Peterborough Sports Hall of Fame.

Windy Pine Point

  • Corporate body

Windy Pine Point is a property located on Kushog Lake, near Minden, near Haliburton County, Ontario. The property was owned by Flora Morrison and Dr. Mary L. Northway from 1940 to 1982. As well as the main cottage, there were cabins which were available to friends and acquaintances. The owners planned and led girls' canoe trips from Windy Pine in the 1940's. It was deeded to Trent University.

Young's Point Cheese Factory Company

  • Corporate body

The Young's Point Cheese Factory was located in Young's Point, Smith Township, Ontario. It was established in the early 1900's and was owned and run by Andrew Wilson. The factory was a family enterprise which included Andrew's brother George, and Andrew's sons, Rex and Len.

Young Women's Christian Association

  • Corporate body

The Peterborough Young Women's Christian Association was founded 1891 when a young man, who greatly appreciated what the Y.M.C.A. had done for him, felt that a similar organization should be offered to women. With the support of Mr. Colville, secretary of the Y.M.C.A., a meeting was arranged at which sixteen ladies attended (two from each church). These ladies became the charter members of the Peterborough Young Women's Christian Association. The first meeting took place over Long's Confectionery Shop on George Street. Bible studies, educational classes and club group meetings were held there. In 1892 a house on the north side of Brock Street (near George Street) was furnished to serve as a Residence for young girls who had no homes in the town. Before long all the work of the Association was carried out at the Brock Street residence. The Peterborough Y.W.C.A. was actively involved in many of the conferences and new ideas that came into the Association. For instance it was one of the first associations to take up Industrial work and offer meetings, in 1909, for girls employed at the electrical works. In 1901 the Y.W.C.A. needed to move into larger quarters due to the expansion of its members. They were able to secure rooms, with the aid of Hon. Senator Cox, on the west side of George Street and stayed there for two years. In 1904 the Y.W.C.A. decided it needed a Y.W.C.A. building and purchased the lot on the corner of Simcoe and Aylmer Streets. The Hon. Senator Cox provided rooms in the Bank of Commerce Building and the rooms on George Street and the house on Brock Street were given up. Mrs. Cox laid the cornerstone September 7, 1904 and the new building was opened in 1905. In 1912 rooms at 133 Rubidge street were formally opened. In 1916 a swimming pool was built and by May 30, 1918 was able to be used. In 1919 the Y.W.C.A. rented a cottage on Stoney Lake as a summer camp. The aim of the Y.W.C.A. was to provide religious education as well as special clubs, classes and parties to encourage the development of the all-round girl who would be the woman of the future. The Y.W.C.A. was considered a fellowship. In 1929 the Y.W.C.A. purchased nine acres of land near the centre of Stoney Lake as a campground, called Camp Inglestane and charged $7.00 a week per girl. The camp was sold at the end of the 1940's. The Y.W.C.A. continued to act as an employment bureau and forming clubs in the industrial sector. In June, 1939 the Peterborough Y.W.C.A. became more newly equipped with a more modern gymnasium and a new pool was opened. A nursery school opened in 1960. The Y.W.C.A. continued to grow and develop with each new year and national and international changes. In 1967 the Y.W.C.A. purchased the Knights of Columbus building as a Centennial project. This building was adjacent to the original Y building and was called Stevenson Hall in memory of James E. Stevenson, the original owner of the property. (Taken from: "The Peterborough Y.W.C.A. 1891 to 1981." Box 3, folder 2, Trent University Archives.) In the original Y.W.C.A. building programs such as Crossroads, which was a program for battered women and a series of shelters, and "Y's Buys" were run. The original building which was on the corner of Simcoe and Aylmer, and had been sold a number of years ago, burnt down on February 15, 1996. (See "Arthur" Volume 30, Issue 19, February 27, 1996, p 8.)

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