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People, Organizations, and Families

John Pierce historical survey collection

  • Corporate body

John Gourley Pierce (1918-2003) was a Peterborough land surveyor and the son of John Wesley Pierce, also a land surveyor, and Mable Pierce. He graduated from Queen's University, served with the Royal Canadian Engineers in Italy and Europe during WWII where he won the Military Cross for Valour. On returning from the war, he joined his father's survey firm, which then became Pierce & Pierce Land Surveyors, in Peterborough, Ontario. In 1947 he completed the survey of the Ontario-Manitoba boundary started by his father in the 1920's. He was President of the Ontario Land Surveyors Association. He was also active in the community and earned numerous awards, among them a citation for outstanding contribution by the Ontario Land Surveyors Association, a City of Peterborough Award of Merit, Rotary's Paul Harris Fellowship, a Sir Sandford Fleming College Fellowship in Applied Education, and the Governor General's Caring Canadian Award.

John Wesley Pierce (1886-1949), father of John Gourley Pierce, was born in 1886 in Eaton, Quebec, the son of Reverend Barry Pierce and Catherine Farnswoth. He attended University of Toronto and was a member of both the Dominion and Ontario Land Surveyors Associations. He was responsible for the definition of the Ontario-Manitoba boundary, begun in 1921 and finally completed by his son in 1947. Until 1932, he worked for the Topographical Survey Branch of the Dominion Department of the Interior and traveled from New Brunswick to the North-West Territories. In 1932 he settled in Peterborough, Ontario and started the survey firm which would become Pierce & Pierce Land Surveyors. (Biographical account supplied by Catherine Cramer).

William Piercy

  • Person

William Piercy was a member of the Royal Air Force during World War II.

Policy Advisory Committee to Robert Lorne Stanfield

  • Corporate body

T.H.B. Symons was chairman of the Policy Advisory Committee to Robert L. Stanfield from 1968-1975. This Committee was established by Robert L. Stanfield in order to "revamp the [Progressive] Conservative Party in the wake of the Diefenbaker debacle, partly by attracting bright, new M.P.s, partly by trying to convince Quebecers that the Conservatives were more than just a party of les anglais" (Taken from: Tailor, Charles. "Radical Tories." p. 194).

R. Waller

  • Person

R. Waller was either a carpenter or wagon maker who lived and worked in Campbellford, Ontario, at the turn of the twentieth century.

Pontypool, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Thomas W. Poole

  • Person

Thomas Wesley Poole (1831-1905), physician and journalist, was educated at Victoria University and received his M.D. in 1856. He practised medicine in Norwood, Canada West; but in 1864 he moved to Peterborough, and became the editor of the Peterborough "Weekly Review". Later he went back to the practice of medicine and practised in Lindsay, Ontario. He died in Lindsay on August 27, 1905. T.W. Poole was the author of "A sketch of the early settlement and subsequent progress of the town of Peterborough. 1867"

Cecil Gray Frost

  • Person

Cecil Grey Frost, younger brother of the Honourable Leslie M. Frost, was born in Orillia, Ontario, on August 27, 1897. His father, William Sword Frost, operated a jewellery and watchmaking business in Orillia, and as Mayor, introduced the concept of daylight saving time to the municipality. Cecil Grey Frost served overseas with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps during the First World War. When he returned to Canada, he attended Osgoode Hall Law School and graduated in 1921. He and his brother Leslie then opened a legal firm in Lindsay, Ontario, and both soon became active in local Conservative Politics. This led to Cecil's election in 1936 as Mayor of Lindsay, and in 1937 to the Presidency of the Ontario Conservative Association, As well, he organized and managed Earl Rowe's campaign in the provincial election of 1937. Thought of as a potential party leader himself, Cecil Grey Frost remained politically active until his sudden death on June 8, 1947.

Port Hope, Ontario

  • Corporate body

Port Hope, located in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, on the shore of Lake Ontario in Hope Township, was informally established in 1819. Previously Port Hope had been known by the name of Smith's Creek, and between 1815 and 1817, the town was also called Toronto. Due to the confusion caused by the use of both names, the name Port Hope, put forth by G.S. Bolton, was settled on in a public meeting in 1819. The name Port Hope was formally confirmed by the Legislature of Upper Canada on March 6, 1834. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Ltd., 1972.)

John Graves Simcoe

  • Person

John Graves Simcoe was the first Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada (now Ontario) from 1791 to 1796. He was born at Cotterstock, England on February 25, 1752. He was an army officer and he was in charge of the Queen's Rangers in the American Revolution. While he was Lieutenant-Governor he established York and a roads system. He urged the formation of British institutions such as a university with preparatory schools. He left Upper Canada in 1796 in ill health. He died at Exeter, England on October 26, 1752. (Taken from: "The Canadian Encyclopedia." Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

George Savigny

  • Person

George Savigny emigrated to Upper Canada from Scotland. He was a farmer and resided on Lot 15, Concession 17, Otonabee, Peterborough County, Upper Canada in the mid-1850's.

Port Hope, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Deryck M. Schreuder

  • Person

Deryck M. Schreuder, born in 1942, is a Professor of History who received his Ph.D. from Oxford University. He joined Trent University's History Department in 1970 as an associate professor and he became the Chairman of the Department in 1978. He retained this position until 1981, when he left Trent University. He is the author of several books including "Gladstone and Kruger: Liberal Government and Colonial `Home Rule' 1880-1885", 1969 and "The Scamble for Southern Africa, 1877-1895: The Politics of Partition Reappraised."

Posters of the Russian Revolution

  • Corporate body

The set of posters of the Russian Revolution were photographed at the Lenin Library in Moscow in 1966 by Italian photographer Caio Garruba and reproduced by him for publication in the West. The originals were created between the years 1917 and 1929, beginning with the October Revolution and spanning a 12 year period of unrest, counterrevolution, famine, foreign military intervention, and economic turmoil. Many were designed by renowned Russian artists, such as Moor, Apsit, Lisitski, Ivanov, and Mayakovski (information taken from the booklet which accompanies the posters).

Betty Lynn Schwab

  • Person

Betty Lynn Viney (now Schwab), formerly of Kenora, Ontario, was a student at Trent University from 1965 to 1969. When Viney arrived at Trent’s Catharine Parr Traill College in 1965, the residence rooms were not yet ready; she lived with Professor Sandeman and his family until the rooms were completed. Viney is married to Robert Schwab and lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

Harold R. Scott

  • Person

Harold R. Scott was appointed Minister of Lands and Forests for Ontario on October 19, 1948. He was made a member of the Executive Council of the province of Ontario the following year.

Margaret Scott

  • Person

Margaret Jane Scott (Maggie) was born in 1881 at Fitzroy in Carleton County, Ontario. She and her twin sister Ida were born to Annie Knox and Archibald Scott. She and her sister were educated at the Lindsay Model School and the Toronto Normal School. Both girls were teachers and taught for a time between the Lindsay and Toronto schools. Before the family lived in Omemee, they had resided at Perth, near Ottawa, Ontario. Margaret died in 1905.

L.V. Shier

  • Person

L.V. Shier, son of Dr. Daniel Webster Shier and Helise Alberta Workman, was a lieutenant with the 20th Battalion Canadians, British Expeditionary Forces, during the World War I. . He was discharged from the army September 12, 1918 and later became a doctor. Shier married Blanche Relyea (d.1972).

Joseph Powadiuk

  • Person

Joseph Powadiuk was a writer and researcher for the federal government. He was interested in the history of Ontario and purchased disparate items from antique shops, auction houses and book stores.

Preceptor Psi Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi

  • Corporate body

Founded in 1931, Beta Sigma Phi is an international women's organization that focuses on stimulating personal growth and development of its members through cultural and social programs and through service to others. Members volunteer for such activities as blood donor clinics, daffodil day, and meals on wheels. The organization supports various charities. Beta Sigma Phi was established in Peterborough in 1944 and the Preceptor Psi chapter was established in 1969.

Shining Waters Presbyterial United Church Women

  • Corporate body

Shining Waters Presbyterial UCW (United Church Women) is a Peterborough, Ontario, organization. Prior to 2013, it was known as Peterborough UCW Presbyterial. Shining Waters Presbyterial UCW is part of a larger organization, United Church Women, formally established in 1962 through the amalgamation of two United Church women’s groups, the Woman’s Association and the Woman’s Missionary Society. As stated in Voices of United Church Women, 1962-2002, the UCW’s purpose is “to unite the women of the congregation for the total mission of the church and to provide a medium through which we may express our loyalty and devotion to Jesus Christ in Christian witness, study, fellowship and service.” (p.v)

Josiah J. Preston

  • Person

Josiah Johnston Preston was born June 7, 1855, as the third son, to James Preston, of American Scots descent and Jane Johnston, of Fermanagh, Ireland. James Preston built one of the first gristmills in Manvers. Josiah was born in the Township of Manvers, County of Durham, Canada West. He had five brothers. He was a grain merchant and in 1887 formed a partnership, called Touchburn & Preston, with Robert Touchburn. Eventually he formed a grain merchanting partnership with his brother Sidney, called Preston Bros. Josiah was deputy reeve and reeve of the Township of Manvers and County Councillor for Division No. 3 in Durham County for 10 years from 1888 to 1897. He was elected 8 times by acclamation. He was elected Warden of the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham by acclamation in 1897. He was appointed clerk of Township of Manvers in 1898 and was holding that office as of 1918. He first returned to the Legislature at the general election of 1902 and was sworn in March 10, 1903 as a member of Provincial Government for Durham East. He was re-elected at the general elections of 1905, 1908 and 1911. He was defeated in the general election of 1919 at age 64. Josiah never married. He belonged to the Anglican church in Bethany and he was an Orangeman and a Mason. He died July 10, 1937. A memorial window was dedicated to Josiah on the west side of St. Paul's Anglican Church in Bethany, Ontario. (Taken from: "The Canadian Parliamentary Guide, 1918." Ottawa: The Mortimer Company Limited, 1918) and (taken from: Carr, Violet M. "The Rolling Hills." Lindsay: The Manvers Township Council, 1967.)

Richard Prettie

  • Person

Richard Prettie owned property in Vernonville, Haldimand Township, Ontario, and may have been a farmer.

Dennis Patrick Sears

  • Person

Dennis Patrick Sears was born in Vancouver in 1925. As a young boy he moved to Saskatchewan near Moose Jaw, where he witnessed an event at the age of six which was to affect his entire life, that of the killing of the hired hand by his father. His father was never charged, and the family moved to central Ontario in Carden Township in 1933. Upon finding hundreds of books stored in his grandfather's house, Sears developed an early interest in reading. In 1943 he joined the navy, and after the World War II, became a policeman in Oshawa. He had already married and had three children, but left his family and job and moved to Calgary, where he continued a troubled life. He soon joined the army and was sent to Kingston to serve in the plainsclothes division of the Provost Corps. Years later he began operating a lift bridge in Kingston, where, in his spare time, he found a renewed interest in literary matters. Soon he was sending letters to the Kingston Whig-Standard, where a favorable response by the editors lead to a regular column, beginning in 1971. Some years later, several of his columns were combined in a book entitled "The Lark in the Clear Air". He has written other books since.(Taken from an article by Ron Base, entitled "Dennis Patrick Sears Grows Up", in Maclean's, June 1975).

Serpent Mounds Foundation

  • Corporate body

The Serpent Mounds Foundation of Peterborough was founded March 22, 1956, as a non-profit organization. The founding members of the foundation all had a common belief in the ethnological and archaeological importance of the Peterborough Serpent Mounds and wanted to create a group whose interests would lie in protecting the site. In the past, the Serpent Mounds had incurred irreparable damage by well and not so well intentioned persons digging for relics. The purpose of the foundation was: to promote the systematic and sustained archaeological investigation of the Rice Lake Serpent Mounds; to assist in the development of the site as an educational and tourist centre; to co-operate with the Royal Ontario Museum and the Parks Division of the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests in these endeavours; to be a local focus point to stimulate interest in the work and support for it; and to provide and administer funds which would enable a thorough archaeological "dig" and study to begin in the summer of 1956 and to continue for four years following 1956.

Peppermint and Abraxas Press

  • Corporate body

Peppermint and Abraxas Press are privately owned by Richard Miller and operated out of Toronto. Peppermint Press was established in 1973 as the printer's private publishing company (Taken from: Kotin, David B. "Reader, Lover of Books." Toronto: University of Toronto, 1981.) and Abraxas Press was established in 1978. Private printing presses in Canada are usually Canadian-owned, owner-managed and limited to an annual list of one to ten titles per year, receptive to new writers, rarely profit-making and often subsidized by government grants. These small private presses often make contributions to the advancement of new literary work and to Canadian cultural life. (Taken from: "Literary Presses in Canada, 1975-1985: A Checklist and Bibliography." Halifax: Dalhousie University, 1988.) Some publications printed by Peppermint include "Pocket Pool: Poems and Parables" by David Berry in 1975; "The Lavender Nightingale" by Catherine M. Buckaway in 1978 and "Stories of the Witch Queen" by Gena K. Gorrell in 1985. Abraxas Press has published a number of broadsides and helped to publish "The Lavender Nightingale".

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