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People, Organizations, and Families

Newcastle District Assessment Records

  • Corporate body

In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, in the District of Newcastle, were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada in 19 Counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.)

David Newhouse

  • Person

David Newhouse is Onondoga from the Six Nations of the Grand River community near Brantford, Ontario. He is Chair of Indigenous Studies at Trent University and Associate Professor, Indigenous Studies & Business Administration. Newhouse was founding editor of the CANDO Journal of Aboriginal Economic Development; past Chair and a current member of the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO) Standing Committee on Education; a member of the Policy Team on Economics for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples; a member of the Independent Panel on Access Criteria for the Atlantic Fisheries for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans; a member of the National Aboriginal Benchmarking Committee of the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board; and, the Science Officer for the Aboriginal Peoples Health research committee for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. (Information taken from Trent University Web site, 08 September 2011).

Gilbert L. Murdoch

  • Person

Gilbert L. Murdoch (1917- ) practised law for 25 years in Oshawa before being appointed as a Peterborough County Court Judge. He, and his wife Mary, moved to Peterborough from Oshawa after he was appointed late in January of 1976. While he was in Oshawa he was a former president of the Rotary Club, a city alderman and involved with the Royal Canadian Air Force Association's 420 wing. He was sworn into the Peterborough court 20 March 1976 at age 59. Judge Murdoch retired in 1995.

Gary Elwood Nichol

  • Person

Born in Combermere, Ontario, Gary Elwood Nichol was a documentary filmmaker. He lived several years in Toronto and Ottawa before settling in Vietnam where he gave up filmmaking and pursued painting. He was married to Tchu Chin and had three children. Nichol died in Saigon 25 March 2009.

New Democratic Party

  • Corporate body

Born out of the Canadian Commonwealth Federation (1932-1960) the New Democratic Party originated in 1961. It is a party which aims to represent the working class and unions of Canada in politics. It is a socialist party advocating the democratic left instead of right wing politics.

Nill family

  • Family

Daniel Nill was a farmer who at one time owned the property at 1202 Morton Line in Cavan, Ontario. The fonds consists of items which were found on the property in 2001; they relate to Nill and to members of the Mason family.

Lindsay, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Hugh David Lumsden

  • Person

Hugh David Lumsden was born at Belhevie Lodge, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, September 7, 1844, the son of Colonel Thomas Lumsden and Hay Burnett. Lumsden was educated at the Bellview Academy in Aberdeen, and at the Wimbledon School, Surrey, England. He came to Canada in 1861 and became a Provincial Land Surveyor in 1866. In 1870, Lumsden became a Civil Engineer and had a long and successful career in the location and construction of railways across Canada. He was involved with the Toronto and Nipissing Railway; the Credit Valley Railway; the Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railway; the Northern Railway; the Georgian Bay Branch of the C.P.R.; The Ontario and Quebec Railway; various eastern extensions of the C.P.R.; and the Crows Nest Pass Railway to name a few. From 1904 to 1909 Lumsden was the Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division of the Transcontinental Railway. He held the presidency of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers in 1907. Lumsden was also involved in activities outside engineering. In 1870 he was the Reeve of Eldon Township, and also president of the Eldon Agricultural Society. He was involved in the military, having joined the 34th Regiment as a Lieutenant in 1867. He married late in life, to Mary Frederica Whitney, daughter of J.W.G. Whitney, in 1885. Hugh David Lumsden died in 1928.

Lubicon Lake Cree Indian Band

  • Corporate body

Lubicon Lake Cree Indian Band resides near Lubicon Lake in Northern Alberta, away from the Athabasca and Peace River systems and populated posts. They lived quietly as a hunting and trapping society until the 1970's when the push for fossil fuels came into force in Alberta. A treaty, called Treaty 8, was sent out in 1899/1900 to adhere the natives in the entire area but it missed the Lubicon Lake Band because they were so isolated. The Band contends that they do not have to adhere to this Treaty since they had never done so before. They are fighting with the federal government for recognition and a separate treaty. Unfortunately the push for fossil fuels by the Alberta government and others has invaded the traditional hunting and trapping grounds of the Lubicon Lake Band and as a result they are struggling to retain their way of life. (Taken from: Myers, Kenneth Murray. "The Struggle for a Way of Life: The History of the the Lubicon Lake Cree Land Claim (1899-1989)." 1990) As of September 1996 the land claim dispute has not been settled.

Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation

  • Corporate body

The Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation (O.A.C.C.) was established in 1965. Ian Macdonald (chief economist of the Department of Economics and Development) was named chairman. The principal function of the Committee was to advise the Ontario government concerning its relationship with other provincial governments and the federal government in the area on constitutional requirements. A Globe and Mail article entitled "Confederation Committee Terms Set Out" stated that "The Premier [John Robarts] said future requirements for the province in connection with British North America must by studied. Certain goals and objections in the fields of biculturalism or multiculturalism and bilingualism must be attained."

Ontario County

  • Corporate body

Ontario County derived its name from Lake Ontario. It is bounded on the south by the Lake and has three harbours: Whitby, Oshawa and Frenchman's Bay. It received its municipal status January 1, 1854. Before then it was part of York County. In 1851, by proclamation, York, Ontario and Peel Counties were made the United Counties of York, Ontario and Peel. In 1852 Ontario broke away from the United Counties to form its own separate county. Peter Perry, an early settler and prominent citizen of Whitby, was instrumental in the separation. The county has two ridings: North and South Ontario. The townships within Ontario County's borders are: Whitby (and the town of Whitby), East Whitby, Pickering, Uxbridge (and the village of Uxbridge), Rama, Scugog, Thorah, Scott, Brock, Mara and Reach. There are also the villages of Port Perry, Cannington and Oshawa, which was the first village in the county. (Taken from: The Illustrated Historical Atlas of Ontario County, Ontario. Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Ltd., 1972.)

Ontario Temperance Federation

  • Corporate body

The Ontario Temperance Federation operated at 39 Davenport Road in Toronto during the 1950s. It produced pamphlets and advertising in the form of posters, films and lectures on the effects of alcohol on people. It reproduced newspapers, articles and letters in order to put across the message that alcohol was a disruptive influence in a person's life. The Federation targeted religious groups, schools and social groups. The Federation originated out of the early temperance societies of the 1800s and the prohibition groups of the 1920s. It produced "The Temperance Advocate," a newsletter aimed at educating the public on the effects of alcohol on a person's intellectual and motor skills.

Ontario Summer Games (1986)

  • Corporate body

The 1986 Ontario Summer Games were held in Peterborough, Ontario from July 17th to 20th. The Games are a provincial festival of sports specifically designed to promote the healthy development of amateur sports across Ontario. In the 1986 games, there were approximately 2000 participants involved in 19 different sporting events. The events ranged from baseball, basketball, softball, volleyball, cricket, track and field, lacrosse, field hockey and rugby to sailing, canoeing, waterskiing, cycling, rifle target shooting and lawn bowling. Most of the funding for the Games came from the provincial government, namely from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

Opera House (Peterborough, Ontario)

  • Corporate body

This Opera House was located on George Street in Peterborough, Ontario, on the site of the Odeon Theatre.

Orange Lodge. Royal Scarlet Chapter of West Peterborough, District No.1

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William J. Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Orange Lodge. Royal Scarlet Chapter of West Peterborough

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from The Sash Canada Wore by Cecil J. Houston and William J. Smyth. University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Orange Lodge. Col. Sanderson Loyal Orange Lodge No. 321

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, convivality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Orange Lodge. Edison Loyal Orange Lodge No. 321

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an Orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William J. Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Loyal Orange Lodge

  • Corporate body

In 1795, the Protestant Orange Order was formed at Loughgall, County Armagh, Ireland, to commemorate the victory of Wiiliam of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The immediate aim of the Orange Order was to protect the local Protestant community from Catholic aggression, but the organization quickly assumed the larger role of defending the Protestant Ascendency in the Government of Ireland. Within the next five years, Orange Lodges had sprung up across the Protestant sectors of Ireland and in the industrial centres of England. As well, the movement had spread across the Atlantic with the emigration of Irish settlers. The first Grand Lodge of British North America was founded in Brockville, Upper Canada, January 1, 1830, by Ogle R. Gowan. By 1835, there were 154 Orange Lodges in British North America. Orangeism had arrived in Upper Canada at the beginning of the 19th century, but the history of the Orange Order is unclear until 1830. For many pioneer men, the Orange Lodge was more of a social organization than a religious organization. It was not necessary, as it was in Ireland, for the lodge to act in a protective manner against the aggression of Catholics. The Orange Lodge provided its members with a sense of fraternity, loyalty, conviviality, identity, and continuity. This was important to the early pioneers who had settled in the region, as feelings of isolation and dislocation were common. Orangemen had pass words and secret signs of recognition for each other. Also, an orangeman could advance through several levels based on his stature and competence within the organization: the Orange, the Blue, the Royal Arch Purple, the Scarlet, and the Black Knight. Orange Lodges were quickly established in the Peterborough region between 1830 and 1833 due to the settlement of large numbers of Irish Protestant emigrants. Later, the British and Scottish settlers in the region would join the lodge. Orangeism remained strong in Ontario over the following 160 years, and in the City of Peterborough, an Orange Hall still exists. (Taken from: Houston, Cecil J. and William J. Smyth. The Sash Canada Wore. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1980.)

Oshawa, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Canadian Underwriters' Association

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection. Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

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