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People, Organizations, and Families

Canada. Census.

  • Corporate body

In 1792, the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham were officially created in a proclamation made by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe. The proclamation divided Upper Canada into 19 Counties for representation purposes. The United Counties are bounded by Lake Ontario in the south, Hasting County in the east, Ontario County in the west and Peterborough and Victoria Counties in the north. The town line between Hope and Hamilton Townships divide the two counties. Durham County consists of the Townships of Cartwright, Manvers, Cavan, Darlington, Clarke and Hope. Northumberland County consists of South Monaghan, Hamilton, Haldimand, Alnwick, Percy, Cramahe, Seymour, Brighton and Murray Townships. (Taken from: "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Limited, 1972.) The land which is now Peterborough County was originally part of Newcastle District before 1841, and the Colbourne District until 1850, the year when districts were replaced by counties in Upper Canada. At this time the United Counties of Peterborough and Victoria was created. In 1861, Victoria County was given independence from Peterborough. Peterbourgh County is made up of the following townships: Galway, Cavendish, Anstruther, Chandos, Harvey, Burleigh, Methuen, Ennismore, Smith, Douro, Dummer, Belmont, North Monaghan, Otonabee, and Asphodel. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Peterborough County 1825-1875." Peterborough: The Peterborough Historical Atlas Foundation Inc., 1975.) Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2,169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it was not until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.) Hastings County was proclaimed the 11th county of Upper Canada in 1792. The second largest county in Ontario, it includes nineteen municipal townships: Bangor, Wicklow and McClure, Carlow, Dungannon, Elzevir and Grimsthorpe, Faraday, Hershal, Hungerford, Huntingdon, Limerick, Madoc, Marmora and Lake, Mayo; Monteagle, Rawdon, Sidney, Thurlow, Tudor and Cashel, Tyendinaga, and Wollaston. Hastings was named after a military leader who had fought in the American Revolution, Francis Rawdon-Hastings (1754-1826). His family name was taken from the town of Hastings in Sussex, England. Until 1849 Hastings County was called the Victoria District. This was changed at that time by the Baldwin Act which replaced district councils with county councils. The first major industry in Hastings County was agriculture, and this was well-established by 1860, with Belleville having the largest saw mills west of Ottawa. Around this time, mining became an important attraction for new settlers, with the extraction of gold at Eldorado, Deloro, Gilmour, and Cordova. Once the Grand Trunk Railway began making stops in Belleville in 1856, the economy of the county improved immensely. Today tourism, lumbering and mining are the major industries of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places on Ontario, Part II." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1981.)

Belleville, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Underwriters' Survey Bureau

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Belmont municipal telephone system

  • Corporate body

The Belmont Municipal Telephone System began operation in 1922 in Havelock, Belmont Township, Ontario. This new system preceeded the Bell Telephone Company and the Havelock-Cordova Telephone Company in Belmont Township. It served subscribers for 33 years. In 1953, the Bell Telephone Company entered into negotiations with the Belmont Municipal System to re-acquire the system.

Benson Mills

  • Corporate body

Benson Mills was a large grist mill which was owned and operated by John Robinson Benson, husband of Catherine Evans Lee. He purchased the mill from Adam Scott. J.R. Benson was one of ten children in a family that settled in Peterborough.

Christ Church, Bobcaygeon, Ontario

  • Corporate body

In 1869, Reverend C.W. Patterson was appointed to Bobcaygeon, Ontario. Previous to 1869, a sum of money had been collected and deposited in the Peterborough branch of the Bank of Toronto as a building fund for the construction of an Anglican Church in Bobcaygeon. It was decided in the same year that enough money had been collected and that a new church and parsonage should be built. Architect John E. Belcher was contracted to design and build the church and parsonage in 1870. On January 5, 1871, Christ Church was formally opened by the Lord Bishop of Toronto.

Canada West. Victoria County Census.

  • Corporate body

Victoria County, formally established in 1860, is comprised of the Townships of Bexley, Carden, Dalton, Eldon, Emily, Fenelon, Laxton, Digby, Longford, Manvers, Mariposa, Ops, Somerville, and Verulam. The town of Lindsay in Ops Township is the county seat. The County is bordered in the north by the Muskoka District, in the east by Haliburton and Peterborough Counties, in the south by Lake Scugog and the Regional Municipality of Durham, and in the west by Durham and Simcoe Counties. It is 2 169 km square in area. The land in Victoria County was first opened for settlement in 1821 and the first settlers were mainly Irish, both Protestant and Catholic, and Scottish Presbyterians. By 1880, lumbering was firmly established as the main industry in the county. Quickly the region was stripped of its forests, and it wasn't until the 1920's that an interest in reforestation developed. Today, Victoria County is a prime grain producing region. As well, chemical industries and tourism make up the present day economic picture of the county. (Taken from: Mika, Nick and Helma. "Places in Ontario, Part III." Belleville: Mika Publishing Company, 1983.)

Annapolis Royal

  • Corporate body

Annapolis Royal (Port Royal) in Nova Scotia is the site of the first European settlement in Canada. It was settled three years before Quebec City in Quebec and two years before Virginia in the United States. A settlement was established in 1605 in the Annopolis Basin by the French. At first it consisted of a wooden palisade, a few small huts or homes and a church. A Governor's house was added to the fort and buildings for munitions and military personnel. Most of the settlers lived outside of the fort area. Eventually the fort was rebuilt of earth and then stone. By 1671 there were approximately 68 families living in Annapolis Royal and by 1686 the population had reached 231 civilians. By arms or treaty the settlement changed hands between the French and the English a total of seven times. In 1710 the English captured Annapolis Royal for the last time. The Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 had the French give her possessions of Acadia and Newfoundland to the Crown of Britain forever. In 1710 Annapolis Royal had been captured by General Nicholas who was later to become the Governor of all of Nova Scotia in 1714. Annapolis Royal was governed by Colonel Vetch of the 1710 war. In 1714 the Queen encouraged Governor Francis Nicholson to allow the French residents to retain their land and tenements or to sell their land. English settlement was encouraged. In 1719 Colonel Phillips replaced Governor Nicolson. By 1720 there were approximately 12 English families living in Annapolis Royal near the fort. (Taken from: MacVicar, W.M. "A Short History of Annapolis Royal, the Port Royal of the French..." Toronto: The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, 1897. microfiche CIHM 09502.)

Canada. Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Records: Black Series

  • Corporate body

Library and Archives Canada holds these records as R.G. 10 which is the Department of Indian Affairs from 1677-1978 and contains 1750.6 m of textual and graphic material. (See also General Guide Series 1983, Federal Archives Division in the Trent University Archives Reading Room.)

Canadian Camping Association : F.M. Van Wagner

  • Corporate body

The first meeting of the Canadian Camping Association was held on May 20, 1936 at the Central Y.M.C.A., Toronto. At this meeting the Association was formally created, a constitution was adopted, officers were named, and steps were taken to begin the nomination process for a board of directors. The first officers of the Association were Taylor Statten, president; Mary Edgar, vice-president; Dr. George S. Patterson, secretary; and Mary C. Donaldson, treasurer. At the time, the primary objective of the Canadian Camping Association was to "further the interests and welfare of children, youths and adults through camping as an educative, recreative, and character developing experience." Over the years this primary goal has remained the focus of the Association with the addition of several other goals. These are: "to present the image of organized camping on a national level; to administer national camping affairs and to act as a liason between provincial camping associations; to encourage the development of high standards in camping; and to develop and promote research, training programs and conferences on a national level". The Canadian Camping Association continues to promote camping in Canada.

Hart House Theatre

  • Corporate body

Hart House was opened in 1919 at the University of Toronto, Ontario. It was a gift to the University by the Massey Foundation. Built by two Canadian architects, Sproatt and Rolph, it had a dining-hall for undergraduates, a faculty club, club rooms for graduate members, a music room, a chapel, a library, a room for debates, a completely equipped little theatre, a sketch room and various offices plus a running track, rooms for boxing, fencing and wrestling, a swimming pool, a billiard room, photographic dark rooms, a rifle range, common-rooms and guest rooms. Hart House was essentially a club for men. (Taken from: Wallace, W. Stewart. "A History of the University of Toronto." Toronto: The University of Toronto Press, 1927.) The Theatre in Hart House was in the basement. Vincent Massey and his wife saw the area before a theatre was built and made the suggestion. The theatre was fully equipped with 500 seats, a green room, a dressing room and property and costume rooms. In 1919 the Theatre presented five plays, four matinees lyriques and a number of lectures on the productions of the Hart House Theatre and, in general, the art of the little theatre. At first the Theatre was operated outside of the University Community. Undergraduates were not in the productions unless they were extremely proficient in their skills. Instead the University relied on more experienced men and women. Students were able to buy tickets at special rates to see the productions. Not only were plays put on in the theatre but it was also used for special lectures, musicals by the music club and productions by other colleges. There were a number of different directors throughout the years who were sympathetic to the students and involved the undergraduates as much as possible in the mechanics of the productions. During the 1920's and 1930's the Hart House Theatre was the leader in Canadian little theatre. In 1930 Hart House Theatre was expanded. The ground beneath the second storey was excavated to provide room for a rehearsal hall, additional rooms and a storage room for the 3 000 costumes that belonged to the theatre. Starting in the 1930's and into the years of World War II the Theatre became used by students and their own productions than it had been previously. A number of well-known Canadian personalities, such as Johnny Wayne, Frank Shuster and Andrew Allan received their start at the Theatre. (Taken from: Montagnes, Ian. The Story of Hart House. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969.)

Canadian Federation University Women's Club of Peterborough

  • Corporate body

The University Women's Club of Peterborough adopted a new name on 26 February 1991 and became the Canadian Federation of University Women Peterborough Club. At that time they adopted a new constitution. The University Women's Club of Peterborough was founded in March 1937 as a member club of the Canadian Federation of University Women. The International Federation of University Women was founded in Europe in the Spring of 1919. On their return to Canada, delegates to that meeting from University Women's Clubs in Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Winnipeg and other Canadian cities met again in August 1919 to create the Canadian Federation of University Women, with Mrs. Margaret Stovel McWilliams of the Winnipeg Club as President. The Canadian organization's aims were to promote the highest standards of education at all levels, to encourage participation in public affairs in the political, economical and cultural fields, and to safeguard and improve the economic, legal and professional status of women in Canada and the World. The International Federation of University Women aims to promote understanding among women of different cultures. There are Member Federations of the IFUW throughout the world and member Clubs of CFUW in all parts of Canada.

Canadian Land and Emigration Company

  • Corporate body

In 1859, the Crown Lands Department in Canada advertised a block of land for sale in the District of Haliburton. The purpose for the sale of the land was to promote rapid settlement of the newly created townships in the District through private enterprise. The townships included in the sale were Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Gilford, Harburn, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre, Clyde, and Langford. In 1861, the land was purchased by a group of English gentlemen, headed by the Honourable Mr. Justice T.C. Haliburton, and the Canada Land and Emigration Company Limited was formed under the laws of Great Britain in 1862. The purpose of the Company was to sell land to settlers, and in return, the Company built roads, conducted surveys, and built saw and grist mills. From 1863 to 1870, a large number of emigrants came to settle in the region. In 1869, Messrs. Boyd, Smith & Company, lumbermen from Port Hope, obtained the timber rights on the Company's lands in the townships of Dudley, Gilford, and Havelock. The lumber business caused an economic boom in the region. By 1871, the Company had sold 16,650 acres to settlers and a number of town lots to various purchasers. In 1872, the Company built a road between the villages of Kenneway and Haliburton. Also, the Company contributed greatly to the cost of the connection of a telegraph line to Haliburton. In 1877, the Company contributed to the construction of the Victoria Railroad Company line from Kinmount to Haliburton with the hopes of increasing settlement in the Townships. This did not happen. By 1883, the Province of Ontario had begun to open up neighbouring townships with offers of free land grants. The Company was unable to cope with this competition. As a result, the Company decided to offer for sale its complete holdings and undertakings in Canada. The Company was purchased by W.H. Lockhart Gordon and James Irwin on April 11, 1883. It should be noted that Mr. Irwin had previously been involved in lumbering in the area, beginning in 1877, and had entered into partnership with Mr. Boyd, who was already involved in the timber industry at that time. On April 10, 1889, Letters of Patent were issued by the Province of Ontario incorporating the new Canadian Land and Immigration Company of Haliburton Limited. From 1890 to 1897 little activity took place. Sales of land and timber cutting right had practically ceased. In 1895, Mr. Irwin declared bankrupcty and the bank (most likely the Canadian Bank of Commerce) took possesion of his rights and interest in Haliburton, which included Irwin's shares in the new Company. During the 1920's the Company sold the entire township of Bruton to the Ontario Hydro-Electric Commission and proceeds from the sale allowed the Company to buy back from the bank the timber cutting rights previously licensed to Irwin. During the depression, lumbering activities ceased once again, but as more roads were constructed, the region began to develop as a tourist and vacation area, and land sales began to increase. At the outbreak of World War II, lumbering activities intensified, and carried on into the post-war years. By the end of 1946, all of the land originally purchased by the Company had been sold. The Canadian Land and Immigration wound up its affairs, surrendered its charter, and ceased to exist. (Taken from a history of the Canandian Land and Emigration Co. Limited located in 77-024/14/12, and Cummings, H.R. "Early Days in Haliburton." Ontario: Department of Lands and Forests, 1963.)

Cape Croker Indian Reserve

  • Corporate body

Cape Croker Indian Reserve is located near Georgian Bay on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. The town of Cape Croker is a native reserve and is home to the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation. The Chippewas of Nawash refer to themselves as Anishnabe. Artifactual evidence suggests that aboriginal people have used the area of Cape Croker for over 2000 years, and oral history records that the waters around Cape Croker were a healing and burial site for Ojibwa from a much larger area. The Chippewas surrendered most of their lands in the treaty of 1857 with the promise from the Canadian government that their sacred burial grounds would be protected. In 2000, the bands of Saugeen and Nawash signed a fishing agreement with the Ontario government which allowed them to fish commercially in the Cape Croker area.

Grafton Womans Missionary Society

  • Corporate body

The Grafton Woman's Missionary Society was a group established at the Methodist Church in Grafton. The Auxiliary members belonged to Grafton's Church of England in Brighton, Ontario, which is in the Bay of Quinte Conference.

Castleton, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Charles E. Goad.

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Cavan Township

  • Corporate body

Cavan Township is located in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham which were established in 1798 by a Proclamation given by John Graves Simcoe. It is bounded on the north by the Township of Emily in Victoria County, on the west by Manvers Township, on the south by Hope Township and on the east by South Monaghan and part of Peterborough Township. It is named after a county in Northern Ireland by early settlers to the area. John Deyell from County Monaghan, Ireland was one of the first settlers to Cavan Township in 1816.

Hudson's Bay Company

  • Corporate body

The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) was chartered May 2, 1670 in London, England by Medard Chouart des Groseilliers and Pierre Esprit Radisson. They had failed to acquire support in France for a trading company that would reach the interior in the New World via Hudson Bay. In 1665 they approached Prince Rupert who was cousin to King Charles II. A number of English merchants, noblemen and the King backed the venture financially. In 1668 the Eaglet and the Nonsuch sailed to the New World. The HBC was a joint-stock company which had a centralized bureaucracy. The shareholders elected a governor and committee to organize fur auctions, order trade goods, hire men and arrange for shipping. A governor was appointed to act on the shareholders behalf in the Bay area and each post was staffed by a chief factor (trader) and council of officers. The HBC competed with the French for control of the fur trade until 1763. The HBC erected forts on the mouths of major rivers flowing into Hudson's Bay. By 1774 the HBC expanded inland onto the prairies and over to the Pacific Ocean. Eventually the HBC was helping provision newcomers and settlers to the area by acting as a trading post. Now the HBC is a major business retailer with its head office in Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1978 it acquired the controlling interest in the Simpsons and Zellers retail chains. It is the oldest incorporated joint-stock merchandising company in the English-speaking world. (Taken from: The Canadian Encyclopedia. Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1985.)

Indian Crafts Foundation of Ontario

  • Corporate body

The Indian Crafts Foundation of Ontario came into being in early 1970 after more than a year of correspondence and planning. Its headquarters were in Toronto and included a staff of executive director and secretary plus a number of part-time craft teachers, buyers and others maintaining contact with native groups throughout the province. The aim of the Foundation was to encourage high-quality craft production by native peoples and to enable the marketing of those crafts. The Foundation experienced financial problems which led to its dissolution in 1973.

Jamaican Self-Help (Peterborough)

  • Corporate body

Jamaican Self-Help (Peterborough) was a registered charitable organization founded in Peterborough, Ontario in 1978 by teachers Rosemary and John Ganley. Registered in 1980, JSH (Peterborough) operated under the slogan "empowering people and building communityā€¯ and was part of a larger organization of Canadians "working in solidarity to foster the development of healthy Jamaican communities through partnership based on mutual respect, understanding and a shared vision of self-determination; and foster an understanding of global forces North and South and their interconnectedness." (taken from: https://www.canadahelps.org/en/charities/jamaican-self-help/). Over its 35-year history, JSH (Peterborough) was concerned with issues of racism, colonialism, etc. and addressed matters such as these through its educational activities; it had numerous ties to other local and international agencies and organizations and links to Trent University through faculty and students. JSH closed its Peterborough office in 2016.

Coboconk, Ontario: fire insurance plan / Chas. E. Goad Company.

  • Corporate body

The Charles E. Goad map making company was established in Montreal, Quebec, in 1875. In its business of creating fire insurance plans, the Charles E. Goad map making company was the most comprehensive company in its coverage of Canada. By 1885, the company was firmly established in Canada and by 1910, Goad and his surveyors had created fire insurance plans for more than 1300 Canadian communities. When Charles E. Goad died that same year, the company was taken over by his three sons, who continued to run the business under the name Chas. E. Goad Company. In 1911 an agreement was reached between the Chas. E. Goad Company and the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association, by which the Goad Company was to create and revise plans for the Association exclusively. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association was founded in 1883 for the purpose of standardizing fire insurance rules. This agreement ended in 1917, and in 1918, the Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association established its own plan making department. It was named the Underwriters' Survey Bureau Limited. At the same time, the Bureau acquired the exclusive rights from the Chas. E. Goad Company to revise and reprint the Goad plans. The Goad Company, which continued to exist until 1930, stopped producing fire insurance plans. In March 1931, the Underwriters' Survey Bureau purchased all of the assets of the Chas. E. Goad Company, including copyright. The Underwriters' Survey Bureau continued to produce fire insurance plans for the cities and towns in Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes. The Canadian Fire Underwriters' Association remained responsible for the production of plans in the western provinces and the B.C. Underwriters' Association was responsible for plans in British Columbia. In 1960, these regional operations were amalgamated with the production of plans under the centralized Plan Division of the Canadian Underwriters' Association. In 1975, the Association changed its name to the Insurer's Advisory Organization, and at the same time, decided to cease fire insurance plan production and sell all plan inventory. This was the end of 100 years of continuous fire insurance plan production in Canada. (Taken from: Hayward, Robert J. "Fire Insurance Plans in the National Map Collection." Ottawa: Public Archives of Canada, 1977.)

Cobourg Post Office

  • Corporate body

Cobourg is located in Hamilton Township, in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, on the north shore of Lake Ontario. The area was first settled in 1798 by Elias Nicholson who built his home within the limits of what was to become the town plot. Originally called Amherst, Cobourg has also been known by the names of Hamilton and Hardscrabble. In 1819, the developing town was given the name Cobourg. The post office was established by 1831 and the first postmaster was prominent businessman and merchant James G. Bethune. Cobourg was incorporated as a village in 1837 and incorporated as a town in 1850. (taken from "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Northumberland and Durham Counties, Ontario." Belleville: Mika Silk Screening Ltd., 1972.; and Guillet, E.C. "Cobourg 17798-1948." Oshawa: Goodfellow Printing Comapny Limited, 1948.)

Cooper & Beatty, Limited

  • Corporate body

Cooper & Beatty, Limited was founded in 1921 by E. Cooper, L. Beatty and J.L. Pepper using the name Trade Composition Company. When Pepper left in 1926 the company was renamed to Cooper & Beatty. Until the Second World War it was essentially a trade typesetting company. In 1950 W.E. "Jack" Trevett acquired the company. Trevett shifted the focus to graphic design, for which Cooper & Beatty became known as one of the leading companies in the field. In 1964 the Trent University crest, as well as Trent's stationary and publications, were designed by Cooper & Beatty's designer, A. Crawford. In 1986 the company was sold to Jannock Corporation and although greatly reduced in size today, continues to operate under the name of Cooper & Beatty Services Ltd.

Council of Ontario Universities

  • Corporate body

The Council of Ontario Universities was formed December 3, 1962 with the original name of the "Committee of Presidents of Provincially Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario". A formal constitution was first adopted December 9, 1966 under the name of "Committee of President of Universities of Ontario/Comite des Presidents d'Universite de l'Ontario". The constitution was amended on January 18, 1968; April 26, 1968; March 13, 1970 and April 16, 1971 at which point the name of the governing body was changed to the Council of Ontario Universities/Conseil des Universites de l'Ontario (effective May 1, 1971). The objectives of the Council are to promote cooperation among the provincially assisted universities of Ontario, and between them and the Government of the Province to work for the improvement of higher education for the people of Ontario. The people who are eligible to sit on the Council or belong to the membership are executive heads of provincially assisted universities in Ontario which grant university degrees (one colleague, elected to membership by the senior academic body of each institution). Other organizations and associations may be affliated with the council. The Council meets a minimum of twice a year and any committees formed through the Council meet when necessary. (Taken from: "Council of Ontario Universities Review 1975-76 to 1977-78 An Uncertain Future." Toronto.)

Cramahe Township

  • Corporate body

Cramahe Township, located in the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham, is bounded on the north by Percy Township, on the south by Lake Ontario, on the east by Brighton Township, and on the west by Halimand Township. Joseph Keeler was the first settler to the Cramahe Township region, coming from Rutland, Vermont, about 1789. In 1793, Keeler brought 40 settlers to the area and built a saw mill, a grist mill, a carding and woolen mill, an oil well and a distillery, all located near the mouth of Keeler's Creek, which was later to become Port Colborne. Joseph Keeler's son, Jospeh A. Keeler was the founder of the village of Colborne, which was later incorporated in 1859. Joseph A. was a merchant, postmaster and Justice of the Peace. Overall, like his father, Joseph A. was an extremely important member of the growing community. In 1815, the post office was established in Colborne. Lumber and grain were the chief exports of Cramahe Township. Two wharves, located at Port Colborne and Port Cramahe, provided links for the transportion of goods to the United States. By 1861, the population had grown to 3,041 made up largely of Native Peoples. The remainder of the population were settlers of English, Irish, Scottish, and American origin.

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