Showing 904 results

People, Organizations, and Families

L.N. Easterly

  • Person

L.N. Easterly was a blacksmith who lived in Wooler, Ontario in the early 1900's.

William John Eccles

  • Person

William John Eccles was born in Yorkshire, England in 1917 and came to Canada in 1928. He served overseas in the RCAF during World War II before studying at McGill University and the Sorbonne. A well-known historian and former faculty member of the Universities of Manitoba and Alberta, he is presently with the History Department, University of Toronto. He has written several articles and books on Canadian history, with a emphasis on the social history of New France. "With the true historian's determination to test even the most widely accepted truths, with an instinct for ferreting out fresh evidence, with a bold lack of respect for time-tested "facts," he has successfully challenged established doctrine at a number of points in Canadian history." (Taken from Ray Allen Billington's foreword in "The Canadian Frontier 1534-1760", revised edition, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969).

Eugene Fredrick Eggleton

  • Person

Eugene Fredrick Eggleton was born April 13, 1889 in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York in the United States of America. He had a sister named Jane A. Eggleton . He lost a finger and three toes at the Waterbury Manufacturing Co. of Waterbury, Conneticut before he joined the military. He left the country on June 12, 1915 to participate in World War I. He was honorably discharged from the United States Army on November 26, 1918. He had received a Silver Bronze Victory button at his discharge. On June 14, 1922 he married Elisabeth Ann Kelly in Peterborough, Ontario. Leo Eggleton, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvannia, was a witness. Eugene and Ann moved to Pennsylvannia where they had a daughter Mary Patricia Eggleton on August 24, 1924.

Alex Edmison

  • Person

Alex Edmison was born in Cheltenham, Ontario in 1903. His ancestors were among the first settlers in Peterborough County. Edmison attended Queen's University and McGill Law School, graduating from the bar in Quebec in 1932. He was an alderman in Montreal and chief legal council for the Montreal Prisoner's Aid and Welfare Association until being commissioned with the Black Watch, Royal Highland Unit, in 1940. From 1946-1959, Edmison was a director of the John Howard Society, and from 1950-1959, Assistant to the Principal at Queen's University. Edmison served on the National Parole Board in Ottawa until his retirement in 1971. He was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1976 for his contributions in the field of criminology. Edmison was appointed to the first board of governors at Trent University in 1964 and remained an active, honorary member until his death in 1979.

Elizabethville School Accounts

  • Corporate body

Elizabethville is a small village in Hope Township, Ontario which is located between Garden Hill in Hope Township and Kendall in Clark Township.

Emily Township

  • Corporate body

Emily Township in Victoria County, previously Northumberland County in Newcastle District, was partially surveyed between October 18 and December 31, 1818 by Samuel Wilmot. The second part of the survey was completed by March 31, 1819. Emily Township is bounded by Verulam Township to the north, Ops and Manvers Townships to the east, Ennismore Township to the west, and Cavan Township to the south. It was described by Wilmot in a letter to the Suveyor General: "The quality of the land whereon there is maple, oak, elm and beech timber is exceedingly good, but the township is very much cut to pieces with swamps and a river that takes its rise in Manvers, presses diagonally through the township from the 2nd concession on that (west) boundary to the 12th concession on the east boundary, with immense marshes on each side." By the end of 1819, 44 settlers had been granted 100 acre half lots in the six concessions of Emily, between lots 8 and 23. By the end of 1820, the population had reached close to 100. The granting of lots tapered off between 1822 to 1824, and the first half of 1825. This occurred for two reasons: 1) the number of individuals coming to the district to seek land had decreased, and 2) the Land Board showed an interest in sending more newcomers into Smith, Otonabee, Ops and Mariposa Townships. Between 1822 and 1824 only 40 land grants were made in Emily. Even though migration into the township had decreased, the population continued grow. By 1825, the population had more than doubled to 216 inhabitants. From September to November of the same year, there was a large influx of Irish emigrants brought into Emily Township by Peter Robinson. In the following year, the population had increased to 837, three quarters of which were Robinson emigrants. The main source of livelihood for the settlers in Emily Township was agriculture. There were no mills in the Township until 1832, when William Cotnam built both grist and saw mills on his land beside the Pigeon River. Industry never really began and the township has remained mainly an agricultural area to the present day. (taken from Pammett, Howard. "Lilies and Shamrocks: A History of the Township of Emily in the County of Victoria". Lindsay: John Deyell Co., 1974.)

Anne Innis Dagg

  • Person

Professor Anne Innis Dagg has a Ph.D. in biology and teaches at the University of Waterloo. She is author of The Feminine Gaze and MisEducation: Women & Canadian Universities.

Greg Doran

  • Person

Greg Doran is a descendant of Irish settlers who emigrated to Peterborough with Peter Robinson in 1825. He was born near the end of the 1960s, the youngest of six children. Greg attended St. Alphonsus Elementary School from 1975-1983, the same school each of his siblings attended. When he graduated, he attended St. Peter’s High School from 1983-1988, when it was located on Reid Street. He graduated from his Ontario Academic Credit (OAC) year (formerly Grade 13), and moved on to Trent University. Between the years of 1988-1992, he completed a joint major, receiving his Honours Degree in Environmental & Resource Studies and Political Studies. It is notable that each of Greg’s siblings also attended Trent, and earned a degree there. Greg worked for the Township of Cavan and NHB Industries in Peterborough, before moving to eastern Canada where he began working as an Environment, Health and Safety Coordinator with an international pipe manufacturing company in 2003. This position provided him with the opportunity to become a certified Canadian Registered Safety Professional in 2007. Greg has continued working in this field with various companies on the eastern coast of Canada.

Doane Family

  • Family

The Doane family were a Quaker family who settled in York County, probably in East Gwillimbury Township, as early as 1815. According to the 1878 Atlas of York County, the family held land on concession 3, lot 15, in that township, more or less equidistant from Sharon and Queensville Post Offices. Other members of the family branched out to North King Township (third concession, near the Holland River), to Pickering Township, Toronto, the United States, and in one case, to the Baptist Mission at Cocanada, Madras, India.

Patrick Daniel

  • Person

Patrick Daniel was a teacher in Ottawa, Ontario until he retired in the 1980s. At the time of his retirement, Daniel purchased a farm that had been bought by his grandmother and uncle near Campbellford, Ontario in the 1920s, and operated it until 2002. In 1979-1980 and 1984 he was a NDP candidate for Victoria Haliburton.

Frederick Montague de la Fosse

  • Person

Frederick Montague de la Fosse was born in England in 1859. He emigrated to Canada when he was 18 years old and worked on a farm in the Muskoka's. He built a house before 1882 and started to clear the land on which he lived. He left in 1883 for the prairies where he joined a surveying team. The story of his adventures in the west are written in "The Western Reminiscences of F.M. de la Fosse". He married Mary Jane Graham Bell in 1885 and they had four children: Margerie, Francis, Bartholomew and Philippa. Between 1885 and 1896 they lived near Lake Rousseau in Stisted Township, since de la Fosse's house had burnt down the year he had returned and before he was able to move into it. He remarried, Amy Vernon Halliday, after his first wife died. Eventually the family moved to Toronto where de la Fosse became the recording secretary of Trinity College. He published many poems in "The Trinity Review" during this time. He moved to the Peterborough area and became the copy editor of "The Peterborough Examiner" from 1907 to 1910. On December 5, 1910 F.M. de la Fosse accepted the position of Peterborough's first public librarian. In 1946 he retired from the library. Under the pen name of Roger Varden, he published "English Bloods" in 1930 which was a story of his arrival in Canada and the subsequent years. He also privately published books of his poetry: "Verses Gay and Grave" in 1937 and "A Dream and an Allegory" in 1944. He also wrote on a wide range of topics including "Centenary History of St. John's Anglican Church, 1827-1927" which was published in 1927. In 1948 he sent a poem to Princess Elizabeth (Queen Elizabeth II) for which he received an acknowledgement from her. Frederick Monatague de la Fosse died at Peterborough on September 26, 1950. (Taken from: Rahmel, Fern. "A Literary Discovery: the 'western reminiscences' of F.M. de la Fosse, Peterborough's first librarian." Occasional paper. Peterborough Historical Society, 1994.)

Arthur B. Bailey

  • Person

Arthur B. Bailey was a sports enthusiast who lived in Mount Pleasant, Ontario at the turn of the century. He was also the catcher on the Mount Pleasant baseball team for the 1914 season.

Marlow Banks

  • Person

Marlow Banks was a resident of Peterborough, Ontario and the owner of the Banks Bicycle Store. He was a hockey fan, and more specifically, a fan of the Peterborough Petes hockey team. Mr. Banks used to sponsor the "Banks Bicycle Store Trophy" which was awarded annually to the Petes regular season scoring champion.

Cameron Family

  • Family

Charles Cameron was born July 29, 1830 at Lossiemouth, Scotland. In 1856 he emigrated to Canada West and opened a business in the town of Peterborough. Three years later, Sophia Barron, also of Lossiemouth, followed Charles Cameron to Canada West, and they were married at Kingston, February 22, 1859. Together they raised four children: Annie Walker, b. 1859; Alfred and Albert, twins, b. 1864, and Sophia, b. 1868. Two other children, Clara, b. 1861 and William, b. 1866, died in infancy. In 1860, Cameron formed a business partnership with Donald McKellar, and as the firm of McKellar and Cameron, they opened a general store at the corner of George and Hunter Streets, Peterborough. They sold groceries and hardware, and acted as commission merchants. On December 8, 1869, the store was destroyed by fire. In 1869, Sophia and the three youngest children went on a visit to Scotland. Charles and Annie later joined them for Christmas in the same year. In the new year Charles returned to Peterborough and became an insurance and steamboat ticket agent. He continued in this line of work until 1903. He died a year later on February 25, 1904. His wife Sophia never returned to Peterborough; she died in Elgin, Scotland, April 29, 1873. It is unknown as to when the children returned to Canada. Albert Cameron went into a curtain and draperies business called Rumsey and Cameron. His twin brother Alfred became a Provincial Land Surveyor. Alfred married Jennie Rose on November 2, 1895 and together they had 8 children. Their first born died at the age of two. Three of their daughters, Jessie, Margaret and Jean remained in Peterborough throughout their lives, and they are responsible for the donation of this fonds to the Trent University Archives. The Cameron home on Chemong Road was dedicated as a women's shelter in 1996.

Camp Illahee

  • Corporate body

Camp Illahee was established in 1946 in Cobourg, Ontario. It began as a children's camp run by the Toronto Y.M.C.A. for diabetic children and later began catering to children with other diseases including heart and kidney conditions, haemophilia, and controlled epilepsy. The camp was later taken over by the Family Service Association of Metropolitan Toronto, an agency of the United Way. The name of the camp was changed to Illahee Northwoods Camp and its location was moved from Cobourg to Drag Lake in Haliburton, Ontario.

Camp Inawendawin

  • Corporate body

Camp Inawendawin was established in 1933 as a girls camp. It became a member of the Ontario Camping Association in 1954 and was operated by Mrs. Helena Anderson. The camp closed in 1964.

Camp Kawabi

  • Corporate body

Camp Kawabi is located 209 km north of Toronto on Big Hawk Lake, which is 32 km north of Minden, Ontario. The camp was a residential boys' camp, operating in the summer, for children between the ages of seven and fifteen.

Camp Pine Crest

  • Corporate body

Camp Pine Crest is a children's camp run by the Toronto YMCA. It was first opened in 1910, and moved to its current location in 1911. The first camp director was E.D. Otter. The camp is comprised of 650 acres (originally only 300 acres) and it is situated on the shores of Clear Lake, Gull Lake and Echo Lake, near Torrence in the Muskokas. Originally, Camp Pine Crest was established as a boys only camp, but in 1980 it became a co-ed camp.

Camp Richiladaca

  • Corporate body

Camp Richildaca was founded by William J. Babcock and Al Bathurst as a day camp in Kettleby, Ontario, in 1957. It grew to accommodate resident campers and was an outdoor education facility for various school boards. It was also a teacher training centre for the University of Toronto Faculty of Education and offered a heated pool, canoeing instruction, archery, snow-shoeing and tobogganing, as well as instruction in wildlife study, ornithology, insect ecology, forest ecology, survival skills, etc. Camp Richildaca was operated by the Babcock family until they sold it in 1989. William J. Babcock was head of the Physical Education Department of Richmond Hill High School and Chairman of the Richmond Hill Ontario Teachers' Federation Outdoor Education Committee. He wrote many articles pertaining to outdoor education.

Camp Robin Hood

  • Corporate body

Camp Robin Hood was established in 1946 at Sherwood Park in north Toronto. In approximately 1964, it moved to Markham, Ontario where Robin Hood Sports Academy was developed. In later years Camp Robin Hood acquired Camp Walden and Madawaska Camps. In addition to offering camping experiences, Camp Robin Hood offers school programs and provides facilities for corporate and private events.

Camp Tamarack

  • Corporate body

Camp Tamarack was established in 1922 as a Jewish Boy Scout's camp. The camp was situated on 350 acres of land in the Muskoka Lake District near Bracebridge, Ontario. The camp aimed to provide a camp setting where each boy counted. The boys were divided into small groups with two staff members to five boys. This allowed the boys to have individual attention instead of being part of a mass group of people. This Jewish Boy Scout Camp was owned by the Tamarack (59th) Association which was a member of the Ontario Camping Association. The camp was first located in the Lake of Bays area. The first Director was Mr. Edgar Reason, also first Scoutmaster of the 59th Scout Troop. In 1957, Stanley G. Wild was appointed Director. Activities at the camp included swimming, canoeing, water skiing and horseback riding as well as numerous other special events like baseball games, fishing, campouts, gymnastics and handicrafts. The campers lived in cabins while they were in the camp. In 1972 the camp closed.

Camp Tanamakoon

  • Corporate body

Camp Tanamakoon was established by Mary G. Hamilton, principal of Margaret Eaton School in Toronto, in 1925 and is located on Tanamakoon Lake in Algonquin Park. A summer camp for girls, Camp Tanamakoon offers an environmental education; activities include tripping, mountain biking, swimming, kayaking, canoeing, wood crafting, and various other activities. Owners of the Camp since its inception include: founder Mary G. Hamilton, 1925-1953; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Raymer, 1953-1974; Hugh and Carolea Butters, 1974-1984; and Kim and Marilyn Smith, 1984 to the present.

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